thisisatrek
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Hi,
I’ve posted about this before, but after results day and getting the grades for my medicine firm offer I’m still unsure if medicine is truly for me. Would you suggest I do a different undergrad degree and then pursue GEM if I feel sure of my decision in 3 years time. Or should I just go ahead in September and see if I like the course.
Both choices have financial implications so I’m really worried.
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EierVonSatan
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What is causing you to have doubts?
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FriedFish
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Medicine is a massive commitment because you will spend many many years studying for it! Maybe do some work experience and see what the job is like?
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thisisatrek
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
What is causing you to have doubts?
I’ve struggled with my mental health quite a bit in the last few years and it’s only ever aggravated due to stress. Knowing that medicine is such a stressful career I’m concerned I will end up depressed again. I like the science behind medicine but I’m not sure if I would even like the clinical side of things. During my work experience all the doctors seemed burnt out and stressed which was concerning.
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
I’ve struggled with my mental health quite a bit in the last few years and it’s only ever aggravated due to stress. Knowing that medicine is such a stressful career I’m concerned I will end up depressed again. I like the science behind medicine but I’m not sure if I would even like the clinical side of things. During my work experience all the doctors seemed burnt out and stressed which was concerning.
Most decently paid careers involve stress and burnout but it seems particuarly acute in medicine.

I wish more students aspiring to do medicine could see what it is like for people in their 20s and 30s in this field.

That said it is very rewarding and we do need great people to do this. I would say to go with your gut feeling, this is not the kind of thing where you will 'just give it a go' you should be sure.
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thisisatrek
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Most decently paid careers involve stress and burnout but it seems particuarly acute in medicine.

I wish more students aspiring to do medicine could see what it is like for people in their 20s and 30s in this field.

That said it is very rewarding and we do need great people to do this. I would say to go with your gut feeling, this is not the kind of thing where you will 'just give it a go' you should be sure.
Yh I was thinking about doing medicine and the thought just fills me with anxiety because I don’t know if I will be a good enough doctor. I think I might pursue biochemistry and see if my mental health improves enough to be able to cope with the pressures of being a doctor.
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FriedFish
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
Yh I was thinking about doing medicine and the thought just fills me with anxiety because I don’t know if I will be a good enough doctor. I think I might pursue biochemistry and see if my mental health improves enough to be able to cope with the pressures of being a doctor.
Instead of being a doctor, have you considered going into research? If you like the science behind it maybe you can check if that’s an option for you?
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thisisatrek
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(Original post by FriedFish)
Instead of being a doctor, have you considered going into research? If you like the science behind it maybe you can check if that’s an option for you?
Yh I was considering that route especially something like medical and pharmaceutical research. What courses could lead me into this?
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FriedFish
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
Yh I was considering that route especially something like medical and pharmaceutical research. What courses could lead me into this?
Biomedical sciences is pretty good! It goes right down that route of research
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ltsmith
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Would you suggest I do a different undergrad degree and then pursue GEM if I feel sure of my decision in 3 years time
If in 3 yrs time you still want to do medicine, you will have just made it twice as difficult to get started.
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R T
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Doing Medicine at Undergraduate is a good degree even if you don't want to become a doctor. The knowledge and skills you pick up are fantastic for anyone with ambitions of medical or biological research or Masters/PhD etc. I know a lot of medics who graduated, decided against being a doctor, went to the city and earned loads of money (medicine is a very well respected degree even in management, banking, law, etc.)

I would recommend doing medicine, keeping an open mind, and figuring out whether or not you want to be a doctor during the degree and placements themselves. If you 100% hate it, that's fine, it would be incredibly easy to switch from medicine to biology (or a similar degree) at your university. It would be easy in 1st year and in later years.
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username3460126
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Specialities such as pathology and radiology have little patient contact anyways since you mentioned you didn't like the clinical side. Also, research is also a good route to take if you don't want any contact with patients. all the best xxx
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Tabathaxx
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have you asked the university if there is a possible option of deferring your place and maybe spend the year in a related work area even if it's a care home or similar finding out if it's for you ? having said that don't automatically assume your mental health will get worse if you do go ahead .. my daughter is just going into year 3 of medicine and her mental health has actually improved . because she knew it had to! so for the first time she worked with her new GP , NHS and university counselor teams and worked as hard on her mental health as her course .. she is a different person now and whilst she still has her moments she is 100 % glad she made the move . please do what is right for you and if you decide to go ahead remember there is no shame in coming home again if or when you need to ... for a weekend for a temporary respite or for a deferred year or t change career totally !
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ecolier
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(Original post by FloralPrints)
Specialities such as pathology and radiology have little patient contact anyways since you mentioned you didn't like the clinical side. Also, research is also a good route to take if you don't want any contact with patients. all the best xxx
Just to let you (and OP) know, even though you may want to specialise in these you would not be able to avoid FY1 and FY2; for many specialties training as a core trainee or registrar means you'd have to have some patient contact or do on-calls.

By the time you're a consultant (that's early / mid / late 30s, depending on your path) you are likely to have changed as a person anyway!
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thisisatrek
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(Original post by ecolier)
Just to let you (and OP) know, even though you may want to specialise in these you would not be able to avoid FY1 and FY2; for many specialties training as a core trainee or registrar means you'd have to have some patient contact or do on-calls.

By the time you're a consultant (that's early / mid / late 30s, depending on your path) you are likely to have changed as a person anyway!
So what would you advise is the best thing to do?
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ecolier
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
So what would you advise is the best thing to do?
Only you can make the decision! You wouldn't be able to avoid taking responsibility and stress at work, whatever you decide to do (medicine or not medicine!)
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zeeshan333
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(Original post by R T)
Doing Medicine at Undergraduate is a good degree even if you don't want to become a doctor. The knowledge and skills you pick up are fantastic for anyone with ambitions of medical or biological research or Masters/PhD etc. I know a lot of medics who graduated, decided against being a doctor, went to the city and earned loads of money (medicine is a very well respected degree even in management, banking, law, etc.)

I would recommend doing medicine, keeping an open mind, and figuring out whether or not you want to be a doctor during the degree and placements themselves. If you 100% hate it, that's fine, it would be incredibly easy to switch from medicine to biology (or a similar degree) at your university. It would be easy in 1st year and in later years.
Strongly agree with this. A Medicine degree is very good to posses even if you don't end up being a doctor due to how powerful it is on your CV.
Last edited by zeeshan333; 1 month ago
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Ivan_Andru
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Maybe try biomedicine? You can still do graduate entry medicine after you finish your degree or 5 years (instead of 6) of undergrad. You’re pretty much guaranteed admission. It’s common.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Ivan_Andru)
Maybe try biomedicine? You can still do graduate entry medicine after you finish your degree or 5 years (instead of 6) of undergrad. You’re pretty much guaranteed admission. It’s common.
Er...this is definitely not the case. Graduate entry medicine is far more competitive than standard entry medicine and doing a biomed degree does not guarantee admission.

(Original post by FloralPrints)
Specialities such as pathology and radiology have little patient contact anyways since you mentioned you didn't like the clinical side. Also, research is also a good route to take if you don't want any contact with patients. all the best xxx
Radiology has frequent patient contact Anyway as ecolier stated, you still need to do many years of work on the wards before you can switch to a histopathology or public health or the like.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Democracy)
Er...this is definitely not the case. Graduate entry medicine is far more competitive than standard entry medicine and doing a biomed degree does not guarantee admission. ....
Maybe they are talking guaranteed admission to a biomedicine degree

(I applied to UCL for that and was given an offer without an interview or anything)
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