Trainee Clinical Physiologist (Neurophysiology)

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JosieDC
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I am coming to the end of my masters (in Neuroscience) at the University of Edinburgh. I also did my undergraduate degree in Neuroscience, and I have been doing a bit of job hunting. Earlier in the year I decided I was quite interested in becoming a "Trainee Clinical Physiologist - Clinical Neurophysiology", and I have just seen a post come up in Glasgow. However they are advertising more for school leavers and the course sounds like a 4 year part time BSc with lots of clinical work too. Does anyone know if they might consider me but adjust the course timeline seeing as I already have 4 years of Neuro education?
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mackers_ire
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I was a former trainee respiratory physiologist fkrv2 years, and got mates working in Cardiac and Neuro physiology.

4 year route is standard now (due to poor uptake of 3 year full-time route, they've switched back to the older part-time study route). Part of the length is due to the need to get enough clinical exposure and get your professional association exams done (if neuros still do them, I'm somewhat out of date! lol). There MAY be a possibility of reducing your training timeline, but not by much e.g. a friend of my with a biology-based master's git the course merely reduced to 3 instead of 4 years.

The other option is the Trainee Clinical Scientist route where you can also specialise in neuro physiology.

PROS:
-3 years of training;
-Master's level qualification;
-better training and qualification salary (generally 1 band higher than the undergraduate route).

CONS:
-more competitive;
-central application process once per year so if you're rejected that's it for the year, whereas the undergrad route you make as many applications to different employers ad you want.

Hopefully someone familiar with the NHS STP programme (the postgraduate route) will be along to give you better info. In the meantime I'd recommend reading this:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/car...ning-programme

I hope it helps
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