shankar jan
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What does "dimer formation of the over-produced receptor" mean in the attachment? I am struggling to understand what a dimer is in the context of biology.
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by shankar jan)
What does "dimer formation of the over-produced receptor" mean in the attachment? I am struggling to understand what a dimer is in the context of biology.
Monomer = single unit
Dimer = 2 units joined together
Oligomer = several units joined together
Polymer = many units joined together

That’s how some receptors work, such as the HER2 receptor. When it’s ligand binds to the receptor, it joins up with another receptor (i.e. dimerises). It can join up with an identical receptor (homodimer) or a different receptor (heterodimer). Once it dimerises, it can then activate a signalling cascade leading to changes in the cell, usually because once the receptors dimerises they phosphorylate each other (autophosphorylation).
So when growth factors bind to HER2, it forms a dimer with another receptor, and that activates a downstream signalling pathway leading to proliferation of the cell.
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shankar jan
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Report Thread starter 2 years ago
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
Monomer = single unit
Dimer = 2 units joined together
Oligomer = several units joined together
Polymer = many units joined together

That’s how some receptors work, such as the HER2 receptor. When it’s ligand binds to the receptor, it joins up with another receptor (i.e. dimerises). It can join up with an identical receptor (homodimer) or a different receptor (heterodimer). Once it dimerises, it can then activate a signalling cascade leading to changes in the cell, usually because once the receptors dimerises they phosphorylate each other (autophosphorylation).
So when growth factors bind to HER2, it forms a dimer with another receptor, and that activates a downstream signalling pathway leading to proliferation of the cell.
Thanks so much!!!
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