britishrice
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Hi!

I'm starting med school at Birmingham this year and I was just if anybody has a more detailed syllabus for the course? I've looked at the modules on their website but I was just wondering if anybody has access to the full list?

Thanks
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by britishrice)
Hi!

I'm starting med school at Birmingham this year and I was just if anybody has a more detailed syllabus for the course? I've looked at the modules on their website but I was just wondering if anybody has access to the full list?

Thanks
So for the first two years, you have four modules each semester covering basic physiology - three are biological sciences and one is medicine in society which covers sociology, psychology, etc. in medicine.
In semester one (foundations 1), the four modules are: molecules to man - which covers molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry; cell communication, endocrinology and pharmacology - self explanatory really; neurones and synapses - again self explanatory; and people, patients and populations - one of the medicine in society modules.
In semester two, the four modules are: muscles, joints and movement - covers muscles, blood supply, their innervation; intro to respiratory medicine - covers basic respiratory physiology; digestive system - basic physiology of the GI system; and another medicine in society module. You'll also have GP placements every fortnight and do basic life support, as well as various student selected components.
In second year you'll learn about infection, immunology, haematology, cardiovascular sciences, renal physiology, cancer, reproductive system and more advanced neuroscience and neuroanatomy.
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britishrice
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
So for the first two years, you have four modules each semester covering basic physiology - three are biological sciences and one is medicine in society which covers sociology, psychology, etc. in medicine.
In semester one (foundations 1), the four modules are: molecules to man - which covers molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry; cell communication, endocrinology and pharmacology - self explanatory really; neurones and synapses - again self explanatory; and people, patients and populations - one of the medicine in society modules.
In semester two, the four modules are: muscles, joints and movement - covers muscles, blood supply, their innervation; intro to respiratory medicine - covers basic respiratory physiology; digestive system - basic physiology of the GI system; and another medicine in society module. You'll also have GP placements every fortnight and do basic life support, as well as various student selected components.
In second year you'll learn about infection, immunology, haematology, cardiovascular sciences, renal physiology, cancer, reproductive system and more advanced neuroscience and neuroanatomy.
Thank you so much!

If you don't mind me asking, how detailed are genetics, biochem and cell communication? Are you expected to know a lot about these areas throughout the whole five years or just the essentials (and maybe just the basics?) Thanks again
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by britishrice)
Thank you so much!

If you don't mind me asking, how detailed are genetics, biochem and cell communication? Are you expected to know a lot about these areas throughout the whole five years or just the essentials (and maybe just the basics?) Thanks again
The lectures are often given in more detail than is absolute necessary, but the extra detail is for the more keen students. You don’t need to know too much, but you need a good understanding of the basics. The same applies for most areas of medicine - you learn a lot of physiology in the first few years, however, when it comes to the clinical years you only need to remember the details that are clinically relevant. An example might be when learning about all of the different transporters in the nephron, when it comes to clinical medicine, you only need to remember those transporters that are targeted by diuretics.
These fields can be absolute minefields, and a very detailed understanding is not required to be a doctor.
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britishrice
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This was incredibly helpful, thank you so much for the info! I really appreciate it ☺️
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