mxo.
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
So I achieved grade 9s in both English literature and English language at gcse, and I am torn between which to do at a level. I like English language, but people have told me A level literature is better. The college I am attending doesn’t offer combined English. Any help is appreciated
0
reply
Cakelover666
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 months ago
#2
if you do literature it involves language analysis. but with language its doesn't involve literature analysis. so with lit you get the best of both worlds
Last edited by Cakelover666; 7 months ago
0
reply
She-Ra
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 months ago
#3
(Original post by myraxo)
So I achieved grade 9s in both English literature and English language at gcse, and I am torn between which to do at a level. I like English language, but people have told me A level literature is better. The college I am attending doesn’t offer combined English. Any help is appreciated
barror1 please can you help?
0
reply
i1e2b3
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 months ago
#4
English lit is viewed more highly by top unis if that will be important to you
0
reply
barror1
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 months ago
#5
(Original post by myraxo)
So I achieved grade 9s in both English literature and English language at gcse, and I am torn between which to do at a level. I like English language, but people have told me A level literature is better. The college I am attending doesn’t offer combined English. Any help is appreciated
It honestly really depends if you want to study English at degree level!
I personally studied both Language and Literature A-levels separately and enjoyed both so much that I am doing a lit/linguistics combined degree
That being said, the vast majority of English degrees do have literature as their primary requirement rather than language.
You will also have some other things to consider:
-Language is much closer to being scientific than literature. You will be learning studies, analysing results etc.
-Literature is EXTREMELY subjective so if that is something you are worried about, it may be worth reconsidering.
- There is also significantly more reading to do around a literature A-level since you need to gain interpretations, whereas with language you can do wider reading, but it is more or less learning off of the spec.
Remember that you always have the option to take both at A-level, and they complement each other well .

Feel free to quote/DM me if you have any questions, and well done with your results! You should be so proud :hugs:
0
reply
EnglishStudent*
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 months ago
#6
(Original post by myraxo)
So I achieved grade 9s in both English literature and English language at gcse, and I am torn between which to do at a level. I like English language, but people have told me A level literature is better. The college I am attending doesn’t offer combined English. Any help is appreciated
I think English Language is quite different at A-Level compared to GCSE. There isn't as high an emphasis on creative writing, for example, which is something you might have enjoyed for your GCSE course. I think it leans towards linguistics more. English Literature A Level would allow you to explore the creative works of writers across time, and how they use language and imagination to perceive and unsettle the world around them. Personally, it would be my pick!

Don't worry about what people have told you. Yes, English Lit is more respected than language and is what you'd need to do English at many unis. However, that only matters if you want to apply to a course that wants more 'prestigious' subjects. Those are Maths, Biology, Chemistry, English Literature, History, Geography, Modern & Classical languages). And, even then, you might not need more than 1. So if you're doing History, English Language and Politics you could still get into competitive law schools, for instance. Having English lit in place won't make such a big difference. I'd advise you to choose the subject which will yield the highest grade.
Last edited by EnglishStudent*; 7 months ago
0
reply
mxo.
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#7
(Original post by barror1)
It honestly really depends if you want to study English at degree level!
I personally studied both Language and Literature A-levels separately and enjoyed both so much that I am doing a lit/linguistics combined degree
That being said, the vast majority of English degrees do have literature as their primary requirement rather than language.
You will also have some other things to consider:
-Language is much closer to being scientific than literature. You will be learning studies, analysing results etc.
-Literature is EXTREMELY subjective so if that is something you are worried about, it may be worth reconsidering.
- There is also significantly more reading to do around a literature A-level since you need to gain interpretations, whereas with language you can do wider reading, but it is more or less learning off of the spec.
Remember that you always have the option to take both at A-level, and they complement each other well .

Feel free to quote/DM me if you have any questions, and well done with your results! You should be so proud :hugs:
Thank you!!! I will take your advice on board!
1
reply
mxo.
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#8
(Original post by EnglishStudent*)
I think English Language is quite different at A-Level compared to GCSE. There isn't as high an emphasis on creative writing, for example, which is something you might have enjoyed for your GCSE course. I think it leans towards linguistics more. English Literature A Level would allow you to explore the creative works of writers across time, and how they use language and imagination to perceive and unsettle the world around them. Personally, it would be my pick!

Don't worry about what people have told you. Yes, English Lit is more respected than language and is what you'd need to do English at many unis. However, that only matters if you want to apply to a course that wants more 'prestigious' subjects. Those are Maths, Biology, Chemistry, English Literature, History, Geography, Modern & Classical languages). And, even then, you might not need more than 1. So if you're doing History, English Language and Politics you could still get into competitive law schools, for instance. Having English lit in place won't make such a big difference. I'd advise you to choose the subject which will yield the highest grade.
Thank you, I think I’m gonna go with language purely because I enjoy it more, and I believe that our of the two I could get the highest grade with that.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

With HE fairs postponed, would a virtual HE fair be useful?

Yes (103)
61.31%
No (65)
38.69%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed