unichoices_help
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Hi,
I'm currently about to start my second year of a-levels and this year I am planning to apply to a university to study law.

I have seen on some other chats that student satisfaction is quite low for Exeter and was wondering if someone wouldn't mind giving me an opinion on the course, teaching style, etc.

I am also interested in studying at Bristol and so was wondering which is better recommended based on the teaching styles and student life in general.


Any helpful replies would be very useful to me,
Thanks.
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Interrobang
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(Original post by unichoices_help)
Hi,
I'm currently about to start my second year of a-levels and this year I am planning to apply to a university to study law.

I have seen on some other chats that student satisfaction is quite low for Exeter and was wondering if someone wouldn't mind giving me an opinion on the course, teaching style, etc.

I am also interested in studying at Bristol and so was wondering which is better recommended based on the teaching styles and student life in general.


Any helpful replies would be very useful to me,
Thanks.
Moved to the law forum
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Duane2501
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I live in Bristol but didn't study here. That being said the nightlife and shopping is great if that helps. Both unis are Russell Group so good choices for law (this is important for a legal career, as I'm sure you know based upon your choices).

I suspect you won't be disappointed with either
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Duane2501)
I live in Bristol but didn't study here. That being said the nightlife and shopping is great if that helps. Both unis are Russell Group so good choices for law (this is important for a legal career, as I'm sure you know based upon your choices).

I suspect you won't be disappointed with either
Russell Group status is irrelevant. If OP's unlucky enough to be applying to employers that really care about university brand, both are good.

This obsession with status really needs to end. It's bad enough when employers do it; we shouldn't be hyping it up on a student forum without reason.
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Duane2501
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Russell Group status is irrelevant. If OP's unlucky enough to be applying to employers that really care about university brand, both are good.

This obsession with status really needs to end. It's bad enough when employers do it; we shouldn't be hyping it up on a student forum without reason.
Good luck making every law firm and chambers change their view on Oxbridge and RG lol. You know as well as I do that the big firms take this into account.
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Duane2501)
Good luck making every law firm and chambers change their view on Oxbridge and RG lol. You know as well as I do that the big firms take this into account.
Erm, no, I don't. And (to repeat my point), the minority of chambers and firms that do practice this snobbery draw the line at Oxbridge - or, in some cases, 'Oxbridge plus' a few others. No one who looks for a 'leading university' will know the full composition of the RG, nor will they know whether some of the weaker institutions are in it (is QUB an RG? Birmingham? Leicester? SOAS? City? QMUL? etc.)

I got my TCs, I don't particularly care about where the line is drawn.
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Duane2501
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Agree to disagree then, but its a fact some Unis are targeted more than others by recruiters which is telling. Even if you think its wrong, why not give yourself every possible chance by going to higher ranking/RG Uni if there's even a chance the firm you apply to cares about that sort of thing?
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Duane2501)
Agree to disagree then, but its a fact some Unis are targeted more than others by recruiters which is telling. Even if you think its wrong, why not give yourself every possible chance by going to higher ranking/RG Uni if there's even a chance the firm you apply to cares about that sort of thing?
I agree with the second part - higher ranking unis do provide some benefits, even if they are not directly 'prestige'-related. The targeting, in itself, can also be helpful, particularly if it comes in the form of dinners or presentations

Some universities are targeted more than others because they have a history of producing good graduates who are successful in what they do. But the fact that the university happens to produce good grads doesn't mean that every single grad from that university will be given some sort of preference! For example, the fact that Oxford has a track record of producing great graduates doesn't mean that a mediocre Oxford graduate will be given any 'leg up' because they went to Oxford. The law firm won't be looking to hire someone like him because, even though it was statistically more likely that he would be a good candidate who would pass all the assessments etc., he ended up underperforming.

People who waffle on about prestige also don't realise that it will only really help you at the first stage of the exercise (passing the sifting). After that, it's down to whether you can pass the various assessments they throw at you.
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Rod2309
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Go to Exeter.

Bristol does a lot of high-stakes 3 hour examinations. Think carefully about whether this is an assessment method you will thrive with.

It is a not a method of assessment that played to my strengths or did much for my mental health. Got my 2.1 but at the expense of making the kind of memories that will allow other graduates to look back upon university fondly.

If you go to Bristol you are getting into over £9k debt pa to be permitted entry to sit, for instance, a 3-hour EU law examination. You will pay £40 for the relevant textbook and spend days locked in your bedroom trying to memorize the contents relating to indirect effect and subsidiarity. The textbook 'EU Law' by Paul Craig and Gráinne de Búrca is over 1,000 pages long. Concepts like 'prestige' and 'league tables' will mean little at this point.

Contrast with Exeter where tort is assessed by a coursework and this presumably rewards people who plod along and do the relevant readings https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/...9/0/assessment
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Rod2309)
Go to Exeter.

Bristol does a lot of high-stakes 3 hour examinations. Think carefully about whether this is an assessment method you will thrive with.

It is a not a method of assessment that played to my strengths or did much for my mental health. Got my 2.1 but at the expense of making the kind of memories that will allow other graduates to look back upon university fondly.

If you go to Bristol you are getting into over £9k debt pa to be permitted entry to sit, for instance, a 3-hour EU law examination. You will pay £40 for the relevant textbook and spend days locked in your bedroom trying to memorize the contents relating to indirect effect and subsidiarity. The textbook 'EU Law' by Paul Craig and Gráinne de Búrca is over 1,000 pages long. Concepts like 'prestige' and 'league tables' will mean little at this point.

Contrast with Exeter where tort is assessed by a coursework and this presumably rewards people who plod along and do the relevant readings https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/...9/0/assessment
Exeter will also have certain written exams. They are impossible to avoid for someone doing a Law degree and both unis will have a combinations of some modules assessed by exams and some by coursework. Unless someone has done the LLB at both Bristol and Exeter, I don't see how they can really say that either one is easier.
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Rod2309)
Go to Exeter.

Bristol does a lot of high-stakes 3 hour examinations. Think carefully about whether this is an assessment method you will thrive with.

It is a not a method of assessment that played to my strengths or did much for my mental health. Got my 2.1 but at the expense of making the kind of memories that will allow other graduates to look back upon university fondly.

If you go to Bristol you are getting into over £9k debt pa to be permitted entry to sit, for instance, a 3-hour EU law examination. You will pay £40 for the relevant textbook and spend days locked in your bedroom trying to memorize the contents relating to indirect effect and subsidiarity. The textbook 'EU Law' by Paul Craig and Gráinne de Búrca is over 1,000 pages long. Concepts like 'prestige' and 'league tables' will mean little at this point.

Contrast with Exeter where tort is assessed by a coursework and this presumably rewards people who plod along and do the relevant readings https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/...9/0/assessment
Do you have a module-by-module breakdown and comparison between the two? This post reads like you're cherrypicking the modules you were especially unexceptional at.
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Rod2309
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Of course exams are an occupational hazard of a Law degree. My point was that a cursory glance at the Exeter Law website demonstrates there is slightly more opportunity to get 'marks in the bag'. Bristol is a very academic programme and my advice would be to go somewhere where it is a bit easier to get a 2.1. I got a 63%. I was a couple of percent away from a degree classification that could have done real damage to my career prospects - law or non-law.

I struggled with 3 hour exams. Almost as if my brain could only absorb enough to write for 2ish hours. The exams are shorter elsewhere e.g. Liverpool. I wish I had applied there! l

My view of my time at Bristol is slightly clouded by the fact that I realised I didn't want to go down the LPC / BPTC route.I work in a non-legal role but where legal skills are useful. I earn a respectable salary - 35k. My team members have various social science/humanities degrees - History, Politics, Classics. Really, I could have studied something that permitted me slightly more visits to Thekla and fewer hours reading about pure economic loss in tort law.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Rod2309)
Of course exams are an occupational hazard of a Law degree. My point was that a cursory glance at the Exeter Law website demonstrates there is slightly more opportunity to get 'marks in the bag'. Bristol is a very academic programme and my advice would be to go somewhere where it is a bit easier to get a 2.1. I got a 63%. I was a couple of percent away from a degree classification that could have done real damage to my career prospects - law or non-law.

I struggled with 3 hour exams. Almost as if my brain could only absorb enough to write for 2ish hours. The exams are shorter elsewhere e.g. Liverpool. I wish I had applied there! l

My view of my time at Bristol is slightly clouded by the fact that I realised I didn't want to go down the LPC / BPTC route.I work in a non-legal role but where legal skills are useful. I earn a respectable salary - 35k. My team members have various social science/humanities degrees - History, Politics, Classics. Really, I could have studied something that permitted me slightly more visits to Thekla and fewer hours reading about pure economic loss in tort law.
Yes it sounds like you didn't pick the best degree for you.

Law isn't for everyone, my daughter studied Psychology at uni and said that passing the GDL nearly killed her by comparison - not just that it was hard for her but also she found it so dull. Like you, she now earns a respectable salary doing something completely different and is happy to never have a read another Law book ever again!
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username4926014
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Surely the best answer for this is to go to whichever one you will do best at? Stating the obvious. They are very different so pick the one you're most likely to feel comfortable with. One is campus and the other city. Have you visited them? Surely one would have felt better than the other? Candidates need to go the places. Far too much is put on 'RG' type comments and reputation, but what's more important is going somewhere where you'll be happy.....and therefore perform better.
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