Clark20
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Need help understanding the question related to Lattice Enthalpy attached below. Thanks.Name:  Screenshot_20190823-105155__01.jpg
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CallMeJamesss
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I havent done this in a long while but hope I can help. Keep in mind that my advice might be wrong

Given the information you received all you need to do is constructed a basic hess cycle you should learn in AS. Lacttice enthalpy is not needed in this question at all!. I don't want to tell you exactly how to do it as it will not help you learn, buddy. Just look carefully at what is given . If you still can't do it, I'll help again.
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Clark20
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(Original post by CallMeJamesss)
I havent done this in a long while but hope I can help. Keep in mind that my advice might be wrong

Given the information you received all you need to do is constructed a basic hess cycle you should learn in AS. Lacttice enthalpy is not needed in this question at all!. I don't want to tell you exactly how to do it as it will not help you learn, buddy. Just look carefully at what is given . If you still can't do it, I'll help again.
Oh, why isnt Lattice Enthalpy required? Since in the book the hess cycle given for calculation of enthalpy change of solution involves enthalpy change of hydration and lattice enthalpy.

Can I have another hint?
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CallMeJamesss
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(Original post by Clark20)
Oh, why isnt Lattice Enthalpy required? Since in the book the hess cycle given for calculation of enthalpy change of solution involves enthalpy change of hydration and lattice enthalpy.

Can I have another hint?
My advice is based on my vague memory (take it with a grain of salt!)

To find the enthalpy change of solution using lattice enthalpy cycle, you need to know both enthalpy change of hydration (gas ion to aqueous ion) and lattice enthalpy (gas ion to solid ionic compound) which you don't! Hess law on the other hand only concerns with the idea that the total enthalpy change will be the same regardless of the intermediate path provided that the end result is the same.

In this scenario, the question clearly gave you a starting point (think carefully about the definition). all you need now is to construct the Hess cycle where one of the paths will give enthalpy change of solution (ionic compound to aqueous ions).
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gaia0619
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