Tkt12345
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Hi
I'm going into sixth form in Sept and want to become a primary school teacher or a special needs teacher. I know that most unis expect you to have a certain amount of hrs spent at a school.
However, as I will be at sixth form, when am I meant to have time to get primary teaching experience?? Because whenever I have holidays so do other schools...
I'm just abit confused by this and would appreciate if any one has any advice
Thank you
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tomlam
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I'd start with stuff like kids clubs, youth groups etc. Getting a job around kids is really beneficial too, swimming teacher for example, although any form of paid employment is infinitely beneficial.
During your timetabled week you'll likely have a few free periods so I'd advise you to ask your school leadership if it would be ok to take those free periods as placement at a primary school. For example, we had an enrichment block every Wednesday afternoon to do this.
Primary courses are way more competitive than secondary, where the standard experience is just 2 days. In primary it's still not long, but you should equip yourself with at least 2 weeks' worth of hours to give yourself a better edge.
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doodle_333
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I volunteered in a primary school one afternoon a week during a levels.
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Tkt12345
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(Original post by tomlam)
I'd start with stuff like kids clubs, youth groups etc. Getting a job around kids is really beneficial too, swimming teacher for example, although any form of paid employment is infinitely beneficial.
During your timetabled week you'll likely have a few free periods so I'd advise you to ask your school leadership if it would be ok to take those free periods as placement at a primary school. For example, we had an enrichment block every Wednesday afternoon to do this.
Primary courses are way more competitive than secondary, where the standard experience is just 2 days. In primary it's still not long, but you should equip yourself with at least 2 weeks' worth of hours to give yourself a better edge.
Thank you! I've spoke to my sixth form and they have a primary school attached to the school where they have said I could do buddying once a week. Once I get my timetable I will see if I have any frees where I could go to a primary school.
Also would you recommend volunteering at kids horse riding clubs? I don't know if this would be beneficial but am thinking of it
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Tkt12345
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(Original post by doodle_333)
I volunteered in a primary school one afternoon a week during a levels.
Yeah my sixth form have said once a week or once every 2 weeks I can to to their primary school which is across the road and do buddying
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tomlam
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(Original post by Tkt12345)
Also would you recommend volunteering at kids horse riding clubs? I don't know if this would be beneficial but am thinking of it
Yes, so so much. For an interviewer, they're not just interested in you on paper, but you as a person. To know that you've got loads of hobbies is huge, and to know that you are willing to share your knowledge and experience with kids is even better. Would make an excellent reference if you need those for the degree route (I know you do for the PGCE).
Btw before applying for my PGCE I did loads of high school outreach stuff for my university. A big part of this was chatting to teachers, admissions staff and PGCE course leaders. I'd wholeheartedly recommend doing more stuff like this, making the interviewer see you as a person is crucial, and more than that, allowing them to relate to you and see themselves in you.
Here is some advice though, you should look into the graduate route of teaching (ie: not straight primary ed, but instead PGCE) because although we'd like to think there will always be a calling for teachers, there may not be due to increased automation. Having qualifications in teaching may be redundant in 30 years time so it may be wise to go down a generic degree route (like a subject degree) then do PGCE primary. It's an extra year, but it may prove to be worth it in the future and because you're not locked into teaching, you can go anywhere.
If you're set on going primary degree though, it's worth picking up some experience from a secondary school, so that you can distinguish between them in an interview and say something about the kids moving up from year 6 to 7.
Last edited by tomlam; 3 weeks ago
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Tkt12345
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(Original post by tomlam)
Yes, so so much. For an interviewer, they're not just interested in you on paper, but you as a person. To know that you've got loads of hobbies is huge, and to know that you are willing to share your knowledge and experience with kids is even better. Would make an excellent reference if you need those for the degree route (I know you do for the PGCE).
Btw before applying for my PGCE I did loads of high school outreach stuff for my university. A big part of this was chatting to teachers, admissions staff and PGCE course leaders. I'd wholeheartedly recommend doing more stuff like this, making the interviewer see you as a person is crucial, and more than that, allowing them to relate to you and see themselves in you.
Here is some advice though, you should look into the graduate route of teaching (ie: not straight primary ed, but instead PGCE) because although we'd like to think there will always be a calling for teachers, there may not be due to increased automation. Having qualifications in teaching may be redundant in 30 years time so it may be wise to go down a generic degree route (like a subject degree) then do PGCE primary. It's an extra year, but it may prove to be worth it in the future and because you're not locked into teaching, you can go anywhere.
If you're set on going primary degree though, it's worth picking up some experience from a secondary school, so that you can distinguish between them in an interview and say something about the kids moving up from year 6 to 7.
Okay wow that sounds great! But I'm a bit confused on how a PGCE primary can be done in 1 year, but for a normal graduate degree it would take 3 yrs. But in this case, do you think it would be beneficial to do a graduation in SEN and then a PGCE in primary. Because if teaching fails I could become an occupational therapist etc. Also if you have any more advice regards to teaching and experience and what's it's like please let me know because this is extremely helpful. Thank you
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