Aspiring barristers who are starting a non-law degree from 2019

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caroline441
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So the BSB announced that they are reforming the current BPTC and the SQE.

I'm planning on becoming a barrister but will be starting a non law degree (philosophy) 2019. Would the GDL still exist by the time I graduate, or will I have to take the new SQE then the Bar course. If so, how long would this take?!
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willtaylor06
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removed😂😂😂😂😂😂 Ÿ˜‚
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Notoriety
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(Original post by caroline441)
So the BSB announced that they are reforming the current BPTC and the SQE.

I'm planning on becoming a barrister but will be starting a non law degree (philosophy) 2019. Would the GDL still exist by the time I graduate, or will I have to take the new SQE then the Bar course. If so, how long would this take?!
The GDL will still exist. The SRA is changing the way solicitors are trained; it has no effect at all on the bar or the Bar Standards Board. You will be required to have a Qualifying Law Degree or the GDL to become a barrister; you will also need to complete a form of the BPTC and a pupillage.

EDIT: The BSB are actually overhauling the BPTC and replacing it with a centralised exam of sorts. Will look into this another time. EDIT EDIT: Basically, the BPTC with a centralised exam or two.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by willtaylor06)
This may help, from lawcareers.net:

Anyone who starts a law degree, GDL or LPC before the SQE is introduced in 2021 should not be affected unless they choose to be. There will be a long transition period of several years from 2021 in which candidates who are already on one of the former courses will be able to qualify as solicitors in the ‘old’ way.

However, although the SRA will continue to recognise the LPC until as late as 2032, candidates won’t necessarily have that long to qualify while avoiding the SQE. The training committee of the City of London Law Society, which represents City firms, has said that firms will not want to run two separate qualification systems alongside each other and are therefore likely to insist that all future hires take the SQE from 2022.

The message is, if you start a law degree in 2020 or 2021, you might well have to take the SQE, but anyone currently in the middle of a LLB, GDL or LPC in 2018 will not be affected.

What is required to become a solicitor under the SQE system?

There are four requirements to qualify as a solicitor once SQE comes into effect in 2021. You must:

have a university degree or equivalent in any subject (law or non-law);
pass the SRA’s character and suitability assessment (this is the same as the old system);
pass SQE stages one and two; and
have two years’ qualifying legal experience (QLE). You may also see this called “qualifying work experience” (QWE).
OP is asking about the bar. You're linking a summary of the changes which applies to solicitors. Hugely confusing to say the least.
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willtaylor06
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(Original post by Notoriety)
OP is asking about the bar. You're linking a summary of the changes which applies to solicitors. Hugely confusing to say the least.
Lol sorry I was just trying to help
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caroline441
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(Original post by Notoriety)
The GDL will still exist. The SRA is changing the way solicitors are trained; it has no effect at all on the bar or the Bar Standards Board. You will be required to have a Qualifying Law Degree or the GDL to become a barrister; you will also need to complete the BPTC and a pupillage.
My problem is that I'm starting a degree in Philosophy this September. Since this is a non law degree, I would have to do a conversion course of some sort or could I go straight to the Bar course which would be reformed by the time I graduate?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by willtaylor06)
.
This is for qualifying as a solicitor, not a barrister.

(Original post by caroline441)
So the BSB announced that they are reforming the current BPTC and the SQE.

I'm planning on becoming a barrister but will be starting a non law degree (philosophy) 2019. Would the GDL still exist by the time I graduate, or will I have to take the new SQE then the Bar course. If so, how long would this take?!
The changes the BSB have proposed so far are mainly with regard to how the BPTC and pupillage training works, although there is a vague reference to further information being published in due course with regard to the three stage qualification (which includes the academic stage). However the Bar still requires a qualifying law degree (although not in as many words now) functionally, so the GDL will still presumably exist for the sake of qualifying career changing would-be barristers. It just won't be necessary for would-be solicitors, as I understand.

https://www.barstandardsboard.org.uk...-requirements/

More detail:

https://www.barstandardsboard.org.uk...f_training.pdf

Specifically:

"The BSB's future training arrangements

8 For undergraduate law degree courses which start in or after 2019/20, current Joint Statement requirements will no longer apply.

9 Subject to approval, the BSB's only regulatory involvement in undergraduate law degrees or CPE courses (ie Graduate Diploma in Law) which will start in or after academic year 2019/20 will be the continuing requirements that law degrees are compliant with the QAA subject benchmark statement for law and that degree courses contain the seven "Foundations of Legal Knowledge" subjects as well as the skills associated with graduate legal work such as legal research.

10 Please be aware that the seven "foundations of legal knowledge" subjects are not always a compulsory element of pure law or mixed law degree programmes. However, the foundations of legal knowledge subjects remain compulsory for all students who wish to be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales. It will be the responsibility of Authorised Education and Training Organisations (AETOs) to ensure compliance with these arrangements."

emphasis mine
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Notoriety
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(Original post by caroline441)
My problem is that I'm starting a degree in Philosophy this September. Since this is a non law degree, I would have to do a conversion course of some sort or could I go straight to the Bar course which would be reformed by the time I graduate?
You'd need to do the GDL.
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caroline441
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
This is for qualifying as a solicitor, not a barrister.



The changes the BSB have proposed so far are mainly with regard to how the BPTC and pupillage training works, although there is a vague reference to further information being published in due course with regard to the three stage qualification (which includes the academic stage). However the Bar still requires a qualifying law degree (although not in as many words now) functionally, so the GDL will still presumably exist for the sake of qualifying career changing would-be barristers. It just won't be necessary for would-be solicitors, as I understand.

https://www.barstandardsboard.org.uk...-requirements/

More detail:

https://www.barstandardsboard.org.uk...f_training.pdf

Specifically:

"The BSB's future training arrangements

8 For undergraduate law degree courses which start in or after 2019/20, current Joint Statement requirements will no longer apply.

9 Subject to approval, the BSB's only regulatory involvement in undergraduate law degrees or CPE courses (ie Graduate Diploma in Law) which will start in or after academic year 2019/20 will be the continuing requirements that law degrees are compliant with the QAA subject benchmark statement for law and that degree courses contain the seven "Foundations of Legal Knowledge" subjects as well as the skills associated with graduate legal work such as legal research.

10 Please be aware that the seven "foundations of legal knowledge" subjects are not always a compulsory element of pure law or mixed law degree programmes. However, the foundations of legal knowledge subjects remain compulsory for all students who wish to be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales. It will be the responsibility of Authorised Education and Training Organisations (AETOs) to ensure compliance with these arrangements."

emphasis mine
Its just so confusing because the SRA and BSB are gradually releasing important information in order to qualify as a solicitor/ barrister. I read somewhere that the new SQE would replace the LPC and GDL - so presumably I would have to take this? Then follow with applying to the Bar course?

I think I would also be the first cohort to go through the new system as well since I won't be starting a law degree, as I got an offer to study philosophy from a good RG uni rather than an offer to study an LLB from a non RG which would make me less competitive. So I don't know to feel going though this route as I would be the first cohort trialled this system...
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caroline441
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(Original post by Notoriety)
You'd need to do the GDL.
I suppose there would be future undergraduates this September who are in the position. I read somewhere that the SQE would replace the GDL/LPC and would be ceased. Not sure about this and would have to look into this more. This was what made me confused as I thought the SQE would equate to a GDL - still unsure so please don't quote me on this.

I was offered a place for Philosophy from a good Russel Group uni and a Law degree from a non degree. Still unsure on which to take.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by caroline441)
I suppose there would be future undergraduates this September who are in the position. I read somewhere that the SQE would replace the GDL/LPC and would be ceased. Not sure about this and would have to look into this more. This was what made me confused as I thought the SQE would equate to a GDL - still unsure so please don't quote me on this.

I was offered a place for Philosophy from a good Russel Group uni and a Law degree from a non degree. Still unsure on which to take.
You need to do more research. The GDL/LPC route relates to solicitors; the SQE relates to solicitors. For the bar, nothing will change (effectively) and you will still need to do the GDL and a form of the BPTC. If you want to be a solicitor, then you will need to pass the SQE1 and SQE2 which are practically equivalent to the GDL and LPC -- except all grads, even law grads, will need to pass SQE1 (which is the equivalent of the GDL). Basically, do more research.

The rule changes for solicitors are meant to make training cheaper and more flexible. Therefore there is nothing really to worry about; the rule changes are good, except for all the confusion they caused.
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username4889668
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(Original post by caroline441)
I suppose there would be future undergraduates this September who are in the position. I read somewhere that the SQE would replace the GDL/LPC and would be ceased. Not sure about this and would have to look into this more. This was what made me confused as I thought the SQE would equate to a GDL - still unsure so please don't quote me on this.

I was offered a place for Philosophy from a good Russel Group uni and a Law degree from a non degree. Still unsure on which to take.
If you want to study philosophy do it. If you want to study law do it. Non-RG doesn’t mean it’s sh*t. Don’t let that dictate your decision.
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