Starting A Level Biology, Chemistry & Maths in September and need advice.

Watch this thread
Englandvines
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
In September I’m starting my a levels for Biology, Chemistry and Maths and Im very scared for the jump from GCSES. (Especially Maths)
I really want to get A’s/A*s but I’m scared I won’t be able to.
At gcse I got:
Chemistry - 9
Biology - 8
Maths - 8

Does anyone have any tips for each specific subjects and give their experience.
Also what should I start doing once I begin my a levels in September.
I’m sorry that this was very long, any replies will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
0
reply
S47W4N
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
At GCSE I had similar results and all I will say is get ahead while you can. Maths was my strongest subject at GCSE and it is now my weakest as I didn't think of it as strongly as I did with Biology and Chemistry (being as it was my strongest subject). One key advice I wish I was given this time last year for me was this: To do atleast an hour a day going over the topics you learnt as you can really get confused very quickly down the line
1
reply
CallMeJamesss
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I received an A* in Chem & Maths so I think I am slightly qualified to answer this.

Maths: For Pure best you can do is Practice, practice, practice...................practice. I know it is expected but yeah :P. Use one of those Solomon worksheets and textbook question go through them all. The more you practice the better you will become at solving problem. The earlier you start the better. For stats and mechanics, in order to confidently apply the ideas from this section, you need an in-depth understanding of what you are dealing with. Basically, you need to understand why the force diagram is constructed a certain way in a certain situation etc. I found reading through textbook multiple times, googling topics that I found confusing and abusing my teacher is very effective.

Chemistry: You do maths, so you should find the maths bits of chemistry very easy after a little practice. The bits you should look out for is the organics. There is no other way around in organic chemistry but pure memorisation, especially the multiple reaction pathways you need to remember. Luckily, there are not too of them to remember so what I did is get a blank piece of paper and construct a mindmap from memory and keep repeating until I remember all the reaction pathway. The cool kids called it ''active recall.'' There are also a looooooooooooot of definitions you need to remember in chemistry. A lot of people use flashcards to try to remember them. However, many people look over this but I think It is very important that you understand the definition rather than just memorize it. This is because by understanding the definition you can actually apply it to questions. When it comes to the theory, I think Chemistry is the simplest of the subjects you chose and you should fly through it. If you ever struggle, I found chemistry textbook by Rob Ritchie and Dave Gent and Chemguide to be very very useful.

Looking back at my A-level experience I think I didn't work hard enough at all and I believe that if you diligently work every day at home and in class, keep up to date with your work and constantly going back over older topics, making sure that you fully understand them before you move on. Then you should be fine. Make sure you have some free time so you don't get burned out. Good luck!
2
reply
Englandvines
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by S47W4N)
At GCSE I had similar results and all I will say is get ahead while you can. Maths was my strongest subject at GCSE and it is now my weakest as I didn't think of it as strongly as I did with Biology and Chemistry (being as it was my strongest subject). One key advice I wish I was given this time last year for me was this: To do atleast an hour a day going over the topics you learnt as you can really get confused very quickly down the line
Thanks for the quick reply!
0
reply
Englandvines
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by CallMeJamesss)
I received an A* in Chem & Maths so I think I am slightly qualified to answer this.

Maths: For Pure best you can do is Practice, practice, practice...................practice. I know it is expected but yeah :P. Use one of those Solomon worksheets and textbook question go through them all. The more you practice the better you will become at solving problem. The earlier you start the better. For stats and mechanics, in order to confidently apply the ideas from this section, you need an in-depth understanding of what you are dealing with. Basically, you need to understand why the force diagram is constructed a certain way in a certain situation etc. I found reading through textbook multiple times, googling topics that I found confusing and abusing my teacher is very effective.

Chemistry: You do maths, so you should find the maths bits of chemistry very easy after a little practice. The bits you should look out for is the organics. There is no other way around in organic chemistry but pure memorisation, especially the multiple reaction pathways you need to remember. Luckily, there are not too of them to remember so what I did is get a blank piece of paper and construct a mindmap from memory and keep repeating until I remember all the reaction pathway. The cool kids called it ''active recall.'' There are also a looooooooooooot of definitions you need to remember in chemistry. A lot of people use flashcards to try to remember them. However, many people look over this but I think It is very important that you understand the definition rather than just memorize it. This is because by understanding the definition you can actually apply it to questions. When it comes to the theory, I think Chemistry is the simplest of the subjects you chose and you should fly through it. If you ever struggle, I found chemistry textbook by Rob Ritchie and Dave Gent and Chemguide to be very very useful.

Looking back at my A-level experience I think I didn't work hard enough at all and I believe that if you diligently work every day at home and in class, keep up to date with your work and constantly going back over older topics, making sure that you fully understand them before you move on. Then you should be fine. Make sure you have some free time so you don't get burned out. Good luck!
Thanks so much for your reply. I’ll definitely take everything you said on board. I’m super grateful for the effort and time you put into replying thanks again
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

Were exams easier or harder than you expected?

Easier (40)
26.32%
As I expected (49)
32.24%
Harder (56)
36.84%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (7)
4.61%

Watched Threads

View All