MrMello
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so I want to get into an alright university for computer science, but will my A-levels be good enough for it? I'm currently applying for computer science, design technology, and geography. I couldn't take a level maths because I did foundation and the highest I got was a 5. However, I'm trying to see if I could do a nov resit and do a higher maths exam for maths i know it's pretty late but I'm trying my best to pursue my career.
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winterscoming
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Your A-Levels subjects are fine. There are plenty of good universities who accept students without A-Level Maths - have a look at this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5007920
(That thread also doesn't include mention of many 'newer' universities -- a complete list would be around 80-90 universities)

Also, don't worry too much about university rankings or perceived reputation. The university rankings are based on research and academic performance rather than graduates' success at finding employment in their chosen career. There are many newer mid and lower ranked universities which are successful in training students up with the technical skills required for IT careers (often involving 12-month industrial placements which are an excellent way to help your employment prospects). Those universities usually have vocational/non-academic degrees which are more like 3-year training courses for technical IT skills.

Most technical IT careers aren't based at all on academia or research, and a lot of IT professionals aren't really mathematicians or people with a particularly strong mathematical background. For example, there's generally little or no maths in most jobs related to Programming, Databases, Networking, System engineering, Hardware engineering, etc. But also, employers hiring someone to do those job are interested in a person's skills and abilities rather than whether they happened to go to a university with strong academic/research credentials. Employers don't get any tangible benefits from hiring someone with a particular degree nor educational background; The bottom line for any business is always about making money, offering good products/services to their customers, etc. Professional IT jobs exist because businesses rely heavily upon having skilled, capable technical experts and problem solvers working behind-the-scenes to build and operate their business computer systems, which ultimately help them make money.

Any employer hiring an IT professional will be interested in how well that person will be able to do the job (including their potential to learn new skills, their enthusiasm and motivation, their communication skills, their attitude, etc). If they meet somebody with excellent technical and problem-solving skills and all the other things, then that person is highly likely to get the job regardless of their GCSEs/A-Levels/University. The role that university plays in your career is mostly about how well you learn those skills while you're there. Even then, that success is mostly down each individual putting in enough effort, rather than university or lecturers.
Last edited by winterscoming; 3 months ago
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MrMello
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Your A-Levels subjects are fine. There are plenty of good universities who accept students without A-Level Maths - have a look at this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5007920
(That thread also doesn't include mention of many 'newer' universities -- a complete list would be around 80-90 universities)

Also, don't worry too much about university rankings or perceived reputation. The university rankings are based on research and academic performance rather than graduates' success at finding employment in their chosen career. There are many newer mid and lower ranked universities which are successful in training students up with the technical skills required for IT careers (often involving 12-month industrial placements which are an excellent way to help your employment prospects). Those universities usually have vocational/non-academic degrees which are more like 3-year training courses for technical IT skills.

Most technical IT careers aren't based at all on academia or research, and a lot of IT professionals aren't really mathematicians or people with a particularly strong mathematical background. For example, there's generally little or no maths in most jobs related to Programming, Databases, Networking, System engineering, Hardware engineering, etc. But also, employers hiring someone to do those job are interested in a person's skills and abilities rather than whether they happened to go to a university with strong academic/research credentials. Employers don't get any tangible benefits from hiring someone with a particular degree nor educational background; The bottom line for any business is always about making money, offering good products/services to their customers, etc. Professional IT jobs exist because businesses rely heavily upon having skilled, capable technical experts and problem solvers working behind-the-scenes to build and operate their business computer systems, which ultimately help them make money.

Any employer hiring an IT professional will be interested in how well that person will be able to do the job (including their potential to learn new skills, their enthusiasm and motivation, their communication skills, their attitude, etc). If they meet somebody with excellent technical and problem-solving skills and all the other things, then that person is highly likely to get the job regardless of their GCSEs/A-Levels/University. The role that university plays in your career is mostly about how well you learn those skills while you're there. Even then, that success is mostly down each individual putting in enough effort, rather than university or lecturers.
Wow, you've put in a lot of thought and time into this answer, thank you so much! I really appreciate your advice and thank you for that forum it really helped! I agree with you as well. I'll be saving your message for my inspiration haha thank you so much
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MrMello
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Your A-Levels subjects are fine. There are plenty of good universities who accept students without A-Level Maths - have a look at this thread: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5007920
(That thread also doesn't include mention of many 'newer' universities -- a complete list would be around 80-90 universities)

Also, don't worry too much about university rankings or perceived reputation. The university rankings are based on research and academic performance rather than graduates' success at finding employment in their chosen career. There are many newer mid and lower ranked universities which are successful in training students up with the technical skills required for IT careers (often involving 12-month industrial placements which are an excellent way to help your employment prospects). Those universities usually have vocational/non-academic degrees which are more like 3-year training courses for technical IT skills.

Most technical IT careers aren't based at all on academia or research, and a lot of IT professionals aren't really mathematicians or people with a particularly strong mathematical background. For example, there's generally little or no maths in most jobs related to Programming, Databases, Networking, System engineering, Hardware engineering, etc. But also, employers hiring someone to do those job are interested in a person's skills and abilities rather than whether they happened to go to a university with strong academic/research credentials. Employers don't get any tangible benefits from hiring someone with a particular degree nor educational background; The bottom line for any business is always about making money, offering good products/services to their customers, etc. Professional IT jobs exist because businesses rely heavily upon having skilled, capable technical experts and problem solvers working behind-the-scenes to build and operate their business computer systems, which ultimately help them make money.

Any employer hiring an IT professional will be interested in how well that person will be able to do the job (including their potential to learn new skills, their enthusiasm and motivation, their communication skills, their attitude, etc). If they meet somebody with excellent technical and problem-solving skills and all the other things, then that person is highly likely to get the job regardless of their GCSEs/A-Levels/University. The role that university plays in your career is mostly about how well you learn those skills while you're there. Even then, that success is mostly down each individual putting in enough effort, rather than university or lecturers.
but anyways do you think it's an alright combination although how broad the subjects are? like the fact, I'm doing computer science, design technology, and geography? I've also thought about trying to do the November resit and try to do higher maths since I did foundation and got the highest you could get which was a 5.
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winterscoming
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(Original post by MrMello)
but anyways do you think it's an alright combination although how broad the subjects are? like the fact, I'm doing computer science, design technology, and geography? I've also thought about trying to do the November resit and try to do higher maths since I did foundation and got the highest you could get which was a 5.
You're fine with those subjects - Computer Science is the best choice for going on to study the subject at university without Maths since there are several universities mentioned in the thread I linked who will accept that instead of A-Level Maths (e.g. Leeds, UEA, Liverpool).

Otherwise, I'd recommend just choosing the other two subjects based on whatever you most enjoy and/or gives you the very best chances of scoring your highest grades (Presumably if you're going to study Computer Science, then that A-Level is already the one you'll enjoy most or are confident with). There are a lot of good universities whose entry requirements are solely about grades (As and Bs), with no preference to any other subjects.

If you can achieve a 6 or higher from retaking the higher GCSE maths paper, that would help with a few universities such as Leeds, QMUL, Reading and several others. It's not essential though. GCSE 5 is good enough for many other universities with perfectly good CompSci courses - e.g. Aston, Portsmouth, Huddersfield, Staffordshire, Bournemouth etc.

If it helps to reassure you, why not visit some universities' websites to see what their entry requirements are? You'll find in most cases they don't say anything about specific subjects (aside from Maths/CompSci), which means they don't care what you choose as your other subjects. Here's a couple from that list:

Cardiff: "ABB-BBB. You will not need to achieve these grades from any specific subjects." - https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/unde...er-science-bsc

Leeds: "AAA including Mathematics or Computing. Grade B (6) or above in GCSE Mathematics is required if no Mathematics A-level is taken." - https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/f919/com...g-bsc#section3

KCL: "AAA At least one of Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Computer Science or Computing. Plus GCSE Mathematics at grade 6/B (or equivalent)" - https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/undergra...er-science-bsc
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MrMello
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Wow thanks a lot for the advice again, I really appreciate it! You've defiantly have made me safer about my a levels and career thank you a lot! I really appreciate the examples of things you've sent.
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Staffordshire University
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(Original post by MrMello)
so I want to get into an alright university for computer science, but will my A-levels be good enough for it? I'm currently applying for computer science, design technology, and geography. I couldn't take a level maths because I did foundation and the highest I got was a 5. However, I'm trying to see if I could do a nov resit and do a higher maths exam for maths i know it's pretty late but I'm trying my best to pursue my career.
Hi mrmellow,
WinterIsComing is right, we do have a Computer Science course you can look into and find out about the entry requirements here: https://www.staffs.ac.uk/course/computer-science-bsc
Alternatively, if you'd like to find out any more information about the university/entry requirements/the course you can email [email protected] and they should be able to guide you

Hope this helps and just shout if you have any more questions!
Thanks,
HB
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