Jjjer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
I’m a bit confused how these work?
I’m going to do a business management degree but why do some good unis like Leeds which is 6th for business have a low grad salary of 23k whereas like Birmingham which is 32nd for business have grad salary of nearly 27k?
Is this important?
Is there still a lot of potiental to get a high paying job even at leeds?

Thanks
0
reply
algoko
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by Jjjer)
I’m a bit confused how these work?
I’m going to do a business management degree but why do some good unis like Leeds which is 6th for business have a low grad salary of 23k whereas like Birmingham which is 32nd for business have grad salary of nearly 27k?
Is this important?
Is there still a lot of potiental to get a high paying job even at leeds?

Thanks
You need to make sure you are taking starting salaries as well as league tables with a pinch of salt! I would say Leeds and Birmingham are pretty much on the same level (maybe Leeds is slightly higher in prestige) as they are both Russell Group, despite the fact they are so far apart on the league tables. I would take the league table as a very, VERY vague indication for the amount of investment a uni is putting into itself, but it isn't very good at measuring the prestige or reputation of a uni, which is often far more important. For example, Kings College London is far below Lancaster on the Complete University Guide, despite the fact that if two applicants from these unis are competing for a job at a top employer, the KCL one is more likely to get it just on the fact that the employer is more likely to know KCL (obviously this is dependent on the situation).
But besides this, starting salaries can often be inaccurate too. They get starting salaries from calling up previous students and asking them, so as you can imagine, quite a lot of them just don't answer. So the small pool of replies can mean year on year the results can be skewed one way or the other. You can either look at previous years of salaries or just make sure you take into consideration that all of them are a 'give or take 5k' kind of situation.
Also remember to consider that starting salaries depend a lot on you too, so you are never limited by the starting salary you see online. If you are the kind of person that has work experience, is networking, is planning to for spring weeks / summer internships, looking at grad jobs etc, you will inevitably do better starting salary wise than your peers. So, yes, there is loads of potential for you to get a high paying job even at Leeds. Also as a heads up, I'm not sure about your situation, but if you are looking at Business Management just for high starting salaries, you also can take lots of other degrees and see very similar if not higher salaries, like Econ, Maths, Engineering, Sciences, anything really. I only say this because I have a friend who for ages planned on taking a Business degree just to get money, until she realised 2 weeks before the UCAS deadline that she really wanted to take Geography instead! She's now at a top uni with a grad job already and really happy!
0
reply
kkboyk
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by Jjjer)
I’m a bit confused how these work?
I’m going to do a business management degree but why do some good unis like Leeds which is 6th for business have a low grad salary of 23k whereas like Birmingham which is 32nd for business have grad salary of nearly 27k?
Is this important?
Is there still a lot of potiental to get a high paying job even at leeds?

Thanks
I wouldn't use graduate salaries to decide which uni to go to, as its very misleading. An institution that scores very high on league tables like Cambridge, LSE etc may see very high graduate earnings simply because it takes high ability students – who would have high earnings regardless – and the result may have nothing to do with the actual impact of the education provided. Some unis who take lower calibre students will have a high graduate earning for a different reason: the uni may simply offer a more practical course and have links with local employers (e.g. Nottingham Trent business graduates average salary of £28,300 six months after graduation).

Also you won't get hired because of your degree and uni name alone You'll be hired based on a combination of soft skills and experience you've developed through uni (well tbh, those going to top unis will be sought after because they're highly likely to have the experience and skills needed for the job).
Last edited by kkboyk; 3 weeks ago
0
reply
Jjjer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by kkboyk)
I wouldn't use graduate salaries to decide which uni to go to, as its very misleading. An institution that scores very high on league tables like Cambridge, LSE etc may see very high graduate earnings simply because it takes high ability students – who would have high earnings regardless – and the result may have nothing to do with the actual impact of the education provided. Some unis who take lower calibre students will have a high graduate earning for a different reason: the uni may simply offer a more practical course and have links with local employers (e.g. Nottingham Trent business graduates average salary of £28,300 six months after graduation).

Also you won't get hired because of your degree and uni name alone You'll be hired based on a combination of soft skills and experience you've developed through uni (well tbh, those going to top unis will be sought after because they're highly likely to have the experience and skills needed for the job).
Thanks so much
0
reply
Princepieman
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
Focus on starting salary for a specific job not a course.. course salary statistics combine (in one number!!!!) a hodge podge of a class of ten to several hundred people's different career interests, motivation for searching for jobs, success in interviewing, decisions to prolong employment etc..

The "top ranked" unis or whatever have higher salaries because they have a culture of graduates funnelling themselves into a narrow set of very high paying grad careers concentrated in London due in part to the excessive marketing they receive from employers who supply those career paths.

Regional unis with a more diverse population might not get the benefit of the doubt for this marketing nearly as much and many people decide to forego moving to a big city in favour of a quieter, less high paid, less expensive life elsewhere.

There is always the case that some people in those circumstances just aren't that great or have their minds set on a career as much as the ones at more "top" unis/programs (but that's a dangerous assumption given how much more lower middle/working class these places tend to be vs the more groomed for success middle middle classes, upper middle classes and elites at top unis).

Also league tables are meaningless, reputation doesn't get formed just by gaming a couple of numbers.
Last edited by Princepieman; 3 weeks ago
3
reply
Jjjer
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Princepieman)
Focus on starting salary for a specific job not a course.. course salary statistics combine (in one number!!!!) a hodge podge of a class of ten to several hundred people's different career interests, motivation for searching for jobs, success in interviewing, decisions to prolong employment etc..

The "top ranked" unis or whatever have higher salaries because they have a culture of graduates funnelling themselves into a narrow set of very high paying grad careers concentrated in London due in part to the excessive marketing they receive from employers who supply those career paths.

Regional unis with a more diverse population might not get the benefit of the doubt for this marketing nearly as much and many people decide to forego moving to a big city in favour of a quieter, less high paid, less expensive life elsewhere.

There is always the case that some people in those circumstances just aren't that great or have their minds set on a career as much as the ones at more "top" unis/programs (but that's a dangerous assumption given how much more lower middle/working class these places tend to be vs the more groomed for success middle middle classes, upper middle classes and elites at top unis).

Also league tables are meaningless, reputation doesn't get formed just by gaming a couple of numbers.
Thanks very much
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (173)
24.3%
Pop (176)
24.72%
Jazz (29)
4.07%
Classical (41)
5.76%
Hip-Hop (128)
17.98%
Electronic (46)
6.46%
Indie (119)
16.71%

Watched Threads

View All