I just know i wont look at my uni notes Watch

Anonymous #1
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I will be just wasting time creating them but how else can I be productive?.
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Hazzabear
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Past papers and quizzes/tests possibly?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Hazzabear)
Past papers and quizzes/tests possibly?
but were going to be tested from the lectures we are given.
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Hazzabear
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(Original post by Anonymous)
but were going to be tested from the lectures we are given.
Why not just look at your uni notes then?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Hazzabear)
Why not just look at your uni notes then?
I can't just look at something - that's not productive is it.
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plainjayne1
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I can only remember things if I write them down. Just creating notes means I have revised. Sometimes if they don't sink in I just write them out over and over until they're burnt on my brain. It's never failed me yet.
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Hazzabear
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I can't just look at something - that's not productive is it.
Recite your notes?

It’s productive if you’re learning things
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Angury
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I can't just look at something - that's not productive is it.
I made flashcards with an app on my phone. I'd test myself during spare moments of my day such as commuting, waiting for lectures etc. Doesn't feel as tedious as reading through a long pile of lecture notes although it's only really useful for rote-learning (rather than understanding a concept).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Angury)
I made flashcards with an app on my phone. I'd test myself during spare moments of my day such as commuting, waiting for lectures etc. Doesn't feel as tedious as reading through a long pile of lecture notes although it's only really useful for rote-learning (rather than understanding a concept).
do you do a science course or an arts course?
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Angury
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(Original post by Anonymous)
do you do a science course or an arts course?
Science.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Angury)
Science.
but how do you manage a 50 off powerpoint lecture? How do you write your qs
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Angury
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(Original post by Anonymous)
but how do you manage a 50 off powerpoint lecture? How do you write your qs
Most of the powerpoint slides are made up of facts that you need to know e.g. the definition of an action potential, the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter etc. You can rephrase these facts into questions: what is the definition of an action potential? What is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the body? etc. Here is an example of flashcards that someone has done for their lectures on Neurophysiology:

https://www.brainscape.com/subjects/neurophysiology
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Anonymous #1
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Thank you everybody
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YaliaV
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Most of the main points may be on the slides. You’ll find what works best for you.

Why did you go anon for this?
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Mr Wednesday
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I can't just look at something - that's not productive is it.
1) Read them through, make sure they are complete, numered in order etc, get copies of any missing bits. Do basic "secretarial stuff", get them filed neatly, and attached to hand outs, problem sheets etc all in one place.

2) Use them to help you understand set problems, essay assignments etc that go with the course. No course is "simply" the lectures, its the full package of lectures, notes, linked problems and you putting it all together mentally by using them. You only really get to understand the notes by using them for something challenging.

3) Based on (2) make condensed versions of your notes with all the key elements that _you_ personally find you need to remember to do the problems. This will be different for every student, so dont expect the lecturer or a friend to do this for you.

4) Memorise (3). be able to write them out complete from memory, practice until you can do this perfectly.

5) Do past exam questions, refine (3) and (4) if it turns out you missed something on the 1st pass (you almost certainly will).
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