Lostx
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Does anyone else suffer from disassociation? My psychiatrist says I have it but I don’t know much about it. Can you please help me to understand it better, and even better, if you have it yourself then please help.
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Obolinda
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I don't have an dissociative disorder but I've experienced dissociation before. I would be lying if I said I knew an awful lot about it but I can answer any specific questions to the best of my ability.😊

You may also benefit from taking to your psychiatrist directly
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marinade
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It's not a very rigidly defined term. Experiences vary massively from person to person and some will associate it with particular disorders e.g. schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia or PTSD.
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Lostx
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(Original post by Obolinda)
I don't have an dissociative disorder but I've experienced dissociation before. I would be lying if I said I knew an awful lot about it but I can answer any specific questions to the best of my ability.😊

You may also benefit from taking to your psychiatrist directly
Thanks for your help.

I am just curious as to how disassociation relates to schizophrenia?
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Lostx
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(Original post by marinade)
It's not a very rigidly defined term. Experiences vary massively from person to person and some will associate it with particular disorders e.g. schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia or PTSD.
Why does disassociation associate with schizophrenia?
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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I experience a lot of dissociation and I identify as multiple (crudely put, one would have called this "split personalities" in the past, but I prefer the term multiple. It's more accurate!). I don't have a formal diagnosis regarding dissociation yet because my former psychiatrist wasn't willing to label it and told me it's just the way I am :dontknow: I'm hoping to pursue it with my new psychiatrist though


My dissociation manifests in various different ways:

- Feeling like I'm "super-real" and that everything around me is 2D/not real, like it's a cardboard set of a soap opera or something

- Feeling like I'm not real but that all my surroundings and everyone around me is "super-real". Everything becomes super-3D, buildings look like they're leaning towards me and about to fall on top of me. Trees pop out as if they're about to grab me

- I do/say things that I have no memory or awareness of. For example, I was telling my male BFF a few years ago about an American diner-style restaurant chain that I knew he'd love and told him we must go there. He looked at me oddly and told me we'd been there a few years back :erm: I was like "we can't have, I'd remember that, you must be mistaken, blah blah" but he was able to tell me exactly where it was, what the interior looked like, and what we both ate. It was only when he mentioned having a Swiss blue cheeseburger (or something like that) that I had any vague memory/feeling of loose recognition.

I also move my lips when with people but no sound comes out and I don't feel my lips move and am not aware that they are :lolwut:


- Recognising places I've been to/lived in but them not feeling at all familiar. It feels like the time I visited the filming locations for The Sound of Music film: it was incredibly familiar but I'd never been there

- I know things that have happened to me, factually, but do not remember them (as in, I don't think or feel like they ever happened to me)

- I have a lot of memory gaps and blanks

- As mentioned, I identify as multiple. That basically means I have five TLGs housed in the one body and all competing for control. Sometimes I have control over who 'presents' but sometimes I don't


If you have any questions, let me know
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Obolinda
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(Original post by Lostx)
Thanks for your help.

I am just curious as to how disassociation relates to schizophrenia?
I'm not sure
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suitepee
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(Original post by Lostx)
Why does disassociation associate with schizophrenia?
Dissociation is more of a detachment from reality, whilst a psychosis (like seen in Schizophrenia) is a loss of reality. Dissociation can show itself in a lot of different ways - you can feel detached from your body, feel like you are in a dream, have amnesia, forget certain events from long ago, become confused about what time it is etc. Sometimes it is a separate disorder - a well known, but rare one is Dissociative Identity Disorder (more commonly known as multiple personality disorder), but it can also be experienced by anyone without that diagnosis, or any mental health diagnosis.

Everyone will have experienced some degree of dissociation at some point in their life - for example, when I drive to work, I am often really focused on what I will do once I get to work. However, when I get to work, I cannot recall any part of my journey - this is a mild form of dissociation. On the other end of the scale, my wife, who has a diagnosis of Complex PTSD sometimes experiences dissociation where she thinks that she is in the year 2012 (before she met me) and will not recognise me, our house, our pets or anything from our life now. She will think that she lives in Brighton and will try to go back to her uni accommodation. This is a more severe form of dissociation.

Sometimes dissociation can look like psychosis, and there can be a bit of a debate whether someones symptoms are psychotic in nature or rather a form of dissociation. For example, with Borderline Personality Disorder the general consensus amongst psychiatrists is that most people who experience voices or paranoia when very stressed is a form of dissociation, rather than psychosis. This is sometimes called "pseudo-psychosis". However, this is a bit of a controversial topic.

It may be worth discussing dissociation with your doctor to see why he feels you experience this. There are ways to cope with it - including distraction and grounding techniques. In the long run therapy can be helpful to either cope with the symptoms or to understand why you are experiencing dissociation - in a lot of cases, it can trace back to trauma, however, in other cases, it may be a way of coping with extreme stress.

Hope that helped - happy to answer any questions
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Anonymous #1
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feel like I have that rn and it’s hard feels like everything’s a blur and I can’t seem to find myself and just feeling of constantly feeling lost and questioning everything
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Jamestweb
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(Original post by Lostx)
Does anyone else suffer from disassociation? My psychiatrist says I have it but I don’t know much about it. Can you please help me to understand it better, and even better, if you have it yourself then please help.
I’ve never heard of it
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