Is anyone really opposed to a Northern Ireland-only backstop? Watch

Notoriety
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Le Male)
The UK supported the US in extrajudicial executions in Pakistan using unmanned predator drones on the grounds that it is justified because "terrorism hurr durr". The UK with Ireland bent over backwards to appease them, it's a disgrace how we persecute Brown terrorists but appease White ones.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afghan_peace_process
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Rakas21
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Napp)
In fairness who really cares what they think? Disgusting bunch of sponges.


not sure Britain has a choice. Either come up with a better idea (laughable considering the chimps we have in power) or go along BoJos road and dont get his much coveted US trade deal.
I mean those are the only options available to you lot.
The Congress issue is less important than you’d think. Any trade deal would not be in force before 2020, if not 2021. Delay it an extra year and the higher presidential turnout gives Trump a decent chance of retaking Congress should he retain power. If the Democrats return then it’s entirely possible we have a friendly president to us who will instruct his Congressmen.

Point being, it’s not that much of an issue.
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Napp
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Rakas21)
The Congress issue is less important than you’d think. Any trade deal would not be in force before 2020, if not 2021. Delay it an extra year and the higher presidential turnout gives Trump a decent chance of retaking Congress should he retain power. If the Democrats return then it’s entirely possible we have a friendly president to us who will instruct his Congressmen.

Point being, it’s not that much of an issue.
Really i'd say its rather salient.. Trump has absolutely no say on the matter and he is far from commanding a true whip, as it were. Never mind the fact there is still a not unsubstantial antipathy to Britain in US political circles, especially among those of Irish extraction.
I mean which ever way their elections go i would not dismiss this threat as idle by any stretch.

... of course this leaves aside the most pressing concern of why on earth would we want a trade deal with America when by all accounts it would be horrific for Britain and her remaining industries.
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Rakas21
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Napp)
Really i'd say its rather salient.. Trump has absolutely no say on the matter and he is far from commanding a true whip, as it were. Never mind the fact there is still a not unsubstantial antipathy to Britain in US political circles, especially among those of Irish extraction.
I mean which ever way their elections go i would not dismiss this threat as idle by any stretch.

... of course this leaves aside the most pressing concern of why on earth would we want a trade deal with America when by all accounts it would be horrific for Britain and her remaining industries.
The people that suggest it would be bad are the people that see trade as zero sum and think we must sign the deal or we must buy the chicken, I personally will still be headed to M&S to purchase my nice fruit and poultry with a big British flag on top. There are gains to made in agriculture and manufacturing from a deal but for the UK the big prize in any deal is services. The greater access we can get, the more beneficial for our economy.

Perhaps your correct but again, the US is already our second largest trading partner behind the Eurozone. At worst, Brexit delivers trade terms with the US no worse than now.
Last edited by Rakas21; 3 weeks ago
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Fullofsurprises
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Rakas21)
The people that suggest it would be bad are the people that see trade as zero sum and think we must sign the deal or we must buy the chicken, I personally will still be headed to M&S to purchase my nice fruit and poultry with a big British flag on top. There are gains to made in agriculture and manufacturing from a deal but for the UK the big prize in any deal is services. The greater access we can get, the more beneficial for our economy.

Perhaps your correct but again, the US is already our second largest trading partner behind the Eurozone. At worst, Brexit delivers trade terms with the US no worse than now.
A combative US trade negotiating team would surely insist that their poultry coming into the UK would be accompanied by a further relaxation of the rules for British badging of the shelf product, which are anyway already totally lax - there is absolutely no guarantee that when something says made in Britain, it actually is. It can be as little as just where it's finally packaged. Some stores like M&S have separate codes of ethics about this, but others don't, Tesco for example.

Various reps and senators in Congress have already said they will block any proposed US-Britain trade deal if the UK has gone against the Good Friday Agreement, of which they are the ultimate custodian.
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Rakas21
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
A combative US trade negotiating team would surely insist that their poultry coming into the UK would be accompanied by a further relaxation of the rules for British badging of the shelf product, which are anyway already totally lax - there is absolutely no guarantee that when something says made in Britain, it actually is. It can be as little as just where it's finally packaged. Some stores like M&S have separate codes of ethics about this, but others don't, Tesco for example.

Various reps and senators in Congress have already said they will block any proposed US-Britain trade deal if the UK has gone against the Good Friday Agreement, of which they are the ultimate custodian.
The senate is a misnomer, it will remain in Republican control no matter who wins. Yeah, Congress is what we were discussing though I point out again that not getting a deal delivers trade terms no worse than now. We are not starting from a trade base of zero with them.

Again I feel the need to point out that we need not sign the deal and firms need not stock the goods. For the record however I actually would be more bothered about relaxed labelling than actually stocking chlorinated food, that should be a condition of entering our market.
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