koopa_beach
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If you complete your PhD at a 'lower ranked' university and would like to start an academic career, does it cut the number of universities you could be employed at? So, if you get a PhD from a university ranked 55 in the league table you cut your chances of getting an academic job by about half?
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
If you complete your PhD at a 'lower ranked' university and would like to start an academic career, does it cut the number of universities you could be employed at? So, if you get a PhD from a university ranked 55 in the league table you cut your chances of getting an academic job by about half?
What matters is the strength of your Supervisor and your emerging publications etc. Lower ranked universities tend to have less well known Supervisors, but not always, there are many, many examples where a lower ranked Uni has a particular subject strength and it's just the place you'd want to go, think Agriculture at the RAC Cirencester, Food Technology at Reading, LIbrarianship at Aberystwyth etc.

You also have to start considering the teaching/research balance of your contract. Chances are at a lower ranked Uni, you'd have a higher teaching component than research, because they rely on churning students through for income rather than big research grants. That might actually suit you better anyway by that time.
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QHF
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
If you complete your PhD at a 'lower ranked' university and would like to start an academic career, does it cut the number of universities you could be employed at? So, if you get a PhD from a university ranked 55 in the league table you cut your chances of getting an academic job by about half?
I'll second tpd's comments: within your discipline, if you work with a supervisor who's widely respected, at a university with a known strength in your field, that can count for a lot even if the university as a whole is not at the top of league tables. If you're seeking a job in academia after a doctorate you'll need to be thinking about publications, teaching experience &c around the PhD whether or not you're at an elite institution.

For what it's worth—and don't let me put you off rolling the dice—I think anyone's chances of securing a permanent academic job are low enough that I'm not sure I'd be that worried about halving them (assuming that any particular single action would halve them, which I'm not sure it would).

Another thing to consider is the scale of the department and of its postgraduate community: some supervisors at some highly-ranked universities have a large slate of PhD students to supervise, and consequently can't (or won't) spend much time on each one. And in a big department with many postgraduates you can wind up lost in the crowd. This is not to say that all supervisors at less famous universities are great, and there are, of course, some practical advantages to working in a big, well-resourced institution with a name that opens doors, but some of these things definitely cut both ways.
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Salll93
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
If you complete your PhD at a 'lower ranked' university and would like to start an academic career, does it cut the number of universities you could be employed at? So, if you get a PhD from a university ranked 55 in the league table you cut your chances of getting an academic job by about half?
I was told by my masters supervisors to only do a PhD at a high ranked/russell group uni. This was because they have the departments, people, money, equipment, support, publication record to enable a research intensive experience. My masters uni (russell group) knew the researchers at the uni I applied for my PhD (another russell group). Active researchers, publishing papers and attending conferences. I did my undergraduate at a lower ranking university and people did not know the lecturers/researchers and the PhD students have a lot of teaching hours. Depends what you want out of your experience. If a PhD at a lower ranking uni was pointless, I'm sure they wouldn't offer them but i'm cautious they use them for cheap labour for teaching.
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koopa_beach
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Thanks for your honesty. I had some advice from people telling me 'it doesn't matter where you go for your PhD' and 'don't go to Oxbridge, they are the worst'. The people who say those kind of things usually have a chip on their shoulder and can't be trusted. I think 'brand names' do matter, even if people don't like it. I took the bad advice and am now completing a fully funded PhD at a university I that will not support me. I feel like I ruined my career.
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Salll93
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
Thanks for your honesty. I had some advice from people telling me 'it doesn't matter where you go for your PhD' and 'don't go to Oxbridge, they are the worst'. The people who say those kind of things usually have a chip on their shoulder and can't be trusted. I think 'brand names' do matter, even if people don't like it. I took the bad advice and am now completing a fully funded PhD at a university I that will not support me. I feel like I ruined my career.
I think that’s it, I think name and status do matter and unfortunately some people hate that. But it’s just how it is.

How do you feel that they can’t/won’t support you?

If it’s opportunities like conferences/presentations, be brave and ask. Seek these yourself.

I have heard of people who have changed university because the PhD wasn’t a great fit for them e.g location, supervisor

So don’t worry that you have ‘ruined’ your career. You will still be getting a PhD and if it really comes to it, you can always move.
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
Thanks for your honesty. I had some advice from people telling me 'it doesn't matter where you go for your PhD' and 'don't go to Oxbridge, they are the worst'. The people who say those kind of things usually have a chip on their shoulder and can't be trusted. I think 'brand names' do matter, even if people don't like it. I took the bad advice and am now completing a fully funded PhD at a university I that will not support me. I feel like I ruined my career.
Funding is a separate matter within prestige, doing an unfunded PhD also reduces the prestige of your degree.
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Scotney
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(Original post by koopa_beach)
Thanks for your honesty. I had some advice from people telling me 'it doesn't matter where you go for your PhD' and 'don't go to Oxbridge, they are the worst'. The people who say those kind of things usually have a chip on their shoulder and can't be trusted. I think 'brand names' do matter, even if people don't like it. I took the bad advice and am now completing a fully funded PhD at a university I that will not support me. I feel like I ruined my career.
Surely if it is funded it must be a dept of some repute.
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