jackrey_nolds
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I’m just starting college and I came from a private school so that’s probably I’m so unaware of it. What are ucas points? How significant are they? Can I sign up for UCAS on my own? Should i?
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geniequeen48
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There's something called google darling.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by jackrey_nolds)
I’m just starting college and I came from a private school so that’s probably I’m so unaware of it. What are ucas points? How significant are they? Can I sign up for UCAS on my own? Should i?
Going to a private school has nothing to do with not knowing about UCAS. Most pre-16 education children won't have heard of it

UCAS Points are a way of translating your grades/qualifications into a single 'measurement'. The higher the grade, the more UCAS points it's worth. Think of it like currency. Some universities use UCAS points to determine minimum entry requirements, but only the 'lower' end universities do this, and the 'higher' end ones tend to use grade requirements.

You do signup to UCAS on your own - normally at the start of your last academic school year, i.e. start of Year 13. Your school will give you a buzzword to enter into UCAS, which links your application to your school, allowing the UCAS Advisor at your school to add your reference etc.
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Dunya
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You'll hope of a time you didn't have to know what it is.
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jackrey_nolds
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(Original post by Dunya)
You'll hope of a time you didn't have to know what it is.
Lmao
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jackrey_nolds
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Going to a private school has nothing to do with not knowing about UCAS. Most pre-16 education children won't have heard of it

UCAS Points are a way of translating your grades/qualifications into a single 'measurement'. The higher the grade, the more UCAS points it's worth. Think of it like currency. Some universities use UCAS points to determine minimum entry requirements, but only the 'lower' end universities do this, and the 'higher' end ones tend to use grade requirements.

You do signup to UCAS on your own - normally at the start of your last academic school year, i.e. start of Year 13. Your school will give you a buzzword to enter into UCAS, which links your application to your school, allowing the UCAS Advisor at your school to add your reference etc.
Thanks, so generally good unis won’t use this system?
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by jackrey_nolds)
Thanks, so generally good unis won’t use this system?
To apply to any* university in the country you use UCAS. Universities have entry requirements and they'll give their requirements as A-level grades (e.g. AAB) and/or in terms of UCAS points (e.g. 112 points) or other grades (such as IB).

*probably
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by jackrey_nolds)
Thanks, so generally good unis won’t use this system?
You asked about UCAS. All UK universities use UCAS to manage their admissions process. UCAS points are a small part of the UCAS system. Only perhaps half of universities use UCAS points publicly and they are the weaker half.
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PQ
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If your school offers BTECs or Cambridge Pre-U as A level alternatives then it’s worth understanding the tariff equivalent of A level grades for your target grades. That way you can quickly identify courses that are possible for your longlist before digging through websites/ringing up to find out the exact equivalencies used by each university.
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by jackrey_nolds)
I’m just starting college and I came from a private school so that’s probably I’m so unaware of it. What are ucas points? How significant are they? Can I sign up for UCAS on my own? Should i?
Ucas points are what you get when you do an exam or other level 3 course (A-levels or BTEC mostly) They are very significant they will for m a large part of your offer so you might get and offer saying 200 points for x or y course when you look at course pages at university's you' might want go to you'll see how many points they want from their applicants your predicted grades will goof them an idea if you meet those criteria The last question I don't quite understand it's not like you can do a group application and you most likely will be applying through your collage You can't do a form right now anyway. You should only do a form if you wan to go to university you'll learn a lot more about it next year.
It's the only way you can apply to uni in the UK.
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returnmigrant
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Do you not have a Careers Adviser at your private school/college?

I suggest you go to the UCAS website and do a great deal of reading.
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dua7860
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Going to a private school has nothing to do with not knowing about UCAS. Most pre-16 education children won't have heard of it

UCAS Points are a way of translating your grades/qualifications into a single 'measurement'. The higher the grade, the more UCAS points it's worth. Think of it like currency. Some universities use UCAS points to determine minimum entry requirements, but only the 'lower' end universities do this, and the 'higher' end ones tend to use grade requirements.

You do signup to UCAS on your own - normally at the start of your last academic school year, i.e. start of Year 13. Your school will give you a buzzword to enter into UCAS, which links your application to your school, allowing the UCAS Advisor at your school to add your reference etc.
You are able to sign up (make an account ) in the summer of y12 because I remember there was a deadline for this too. The rest of what you said is right.
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dua7860
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(Original post by PQ)
If your school offers BTECs or Cambridge Pre-U as A level alternatives then it’s worth understanding the tariff equivalent of A level grades for your target grades. That way you can quickly identify courses that are possible for your longlist before digging through websites/ringing up to find out the exact equivalencies used by each university.
most or if not all universities now accept Btec(including Oxbridge). This is since 2016 as they changed the course by adding exams .
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PQ
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(Original post by dua7860)
most or if not all universities now accept Btec(including Oxbridge). This is since 2016 as they changed the course by adding exams .
I know.

My post didn’t claim otherwise just suggested a way to come up with a longlist of universities using A level equivalent standard offers (which are easy to find) before digging through prospectuses for standard offers for other qualifications (which are often not easy to find).
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by jackrey_nolds)
Thanks, so generally good unis won’t use this system?
The term “good uni” is pretty broad It depends on the course for instance Solent uses the points system but when it comes to courses like water sports and the like they are the best in the country. Basically the only truly good uni is the one that feels right to you if you don’t feel comfortable in the place no matter how good the reputation you won’t last. Location is paramount when choosing a uni I know I speak from experience .
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