shankar jan
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Cancer cell that has more mutations/more differentiated is less malignant --> you get a less malignant tumour

So if you apparently get cancer as a child, then you have a very maligant tumour.

And if you get cancer as an adult, then much higher chance of getting rid of it.

More differentiation = less malignancy of tumour
Less differentiation=more malignant tumour

But that doesn't make sense because you develop cancer after a lot of mutations, not when you have just very few mutations.

Also, why is it that by finding out that someone has cancer at an earlier stage, you can get rid of the cancer? Shouldn't you let the cancer progress so that it becomes more differentiated and therefore less malignant.

Any help will be very very appreciated!!! :/
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shankar jan
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username4006618
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(Original post by shankar jan)
Cancer cell that has more mutations/more differentiated is less malignant --> you get a less malignant tumour

So if you apparently get cancer as a child, then you have a very maligant tumour.

And if you get cancer as an adult, then much higher chance of getting rid of it.

More differentiation = less malignancy of tumour
Less differentiation=more malignant tumour

But that doesn't make sense because you develop cancer after a lot of mutations, not when you have just very few mutations.

Also, why is it that by finding out that someone has cancer at an earlier stage, you can get rid of the cancer? Shouldn't you let the cancer progress so that it becomes more differentiated and therefore less malignant.

Any help will be very very appreciated!!! :/
Lol if you let the cancer progress it will spread to other organs and then you’re f*cked. At an early stage it hasn’t spread so a simple surgery can sometimes cure you.
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by shankar jan)
Cancer cell that has more mutations/more differentiated is less malignant --> you get a less malignant tumour

So if you apparently get cancer as a child, then you have a very maligant tumour.

And if you get cancer as an adult, then much higher chance of getting rid of it.

More differentiation = less malignancy of tumour
Less differentiation=more malignant tumour

But that doesn't make sense because you develop cancer after a lot of mutations, not when you have just very few mutations.

Also, why is it that by finding out that someone has cancer at an earlier stage, you can get rid of the cancer? Shouldn't you let the cancer progress so that it becomes more differentiated and therefore less malignant.

Any help will be very very appreciated!!! :/
No, your understanding here is wrong. More differentiated does not mean that it has more mutations - it refers to how closely the tumour/cancer cells resemble the tissue of origin. For example, a well-differentiated breast cancer will look similar to normal breast tissue under the microscope. A poorly differentiated breast cancer will look very different to normal breast tissue under the microscope. This is what a histopathologist is looking for when grading a tumour. The less differentiated a tumour cell, the poorer the prognosis. If anything, a tumour cell that is poorly differentiated has probably acquired more mutations than a well differentiated tumour.

Hopefully now it’s clear to see that tumours do not become ‘less malignant’ with time, if anything, they acquire more mutations, become less differentiated, and become even more malignant.
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shankar jan
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(Original post by anonymousamk)
Lol if you let the cancer progress it will spread to other organs and then you’re f*cked. At an early stage it hasn’t spread so a simple surgery can sometimes cure you.
Thanks so much
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shankar jan
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
No, your understanding here is wrong. More differentiated does not mean that it has more mutations - it refers to how closely the tumour/cancer cells resemble the tissue of origin. For example, a well-differentiated breast cancer will look similar to normal breast tissue under the microscope. A poorly differentiated breast cancer will look very different to normal breast tissue under the microscope. This is what a histopathologist is looking for when grading a tumour. The less differentiated a tumour cell, the poorer the prognosis. If anything, a tumour cell that is poorly differentiated has probably acquired more mutations than a well differentiated tumour.

Hopefully now it’s clear to see that tumours do not become ‘less malignant’ with time, if anything, they acquire more mutations, become less differentiated, and become even more malignant.
Ah yes! It is very clear now!! Thank you very much!!
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