febreze
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi! So I'm about to be in year 10 and I want to start and plan some of my revision. I am aiming for 8's 9's (my targets). Honestly any help on how to revise for specific subjects would be really appreciated as I am drawing a blank on how to approach it.
I am taking 12 GCSES
AQA English Language and Literature
AQA Religious Studies: Christianity and Islam, Themes
AQA Maths
AQA Biology, Chemistry and Physics
Edexcel History: Crime and Punishment, Whitechapel, Henry V111 etc.
Edexcel French
AQA Sociology
AQA Business Studies
i’m reposting this to see if anyone has any other ideas so i’m sorry if you’ve already seen it x
0
reply
123SophieW
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Here are some ways I revise:
Revition cards for key people, quotes etc I draw on them wight in different colours any way that makes them memorable to you;
I take really ruff notes in classes in a separate notebook and then at home when I can reread them and wright them up properly in my work book or on paper to put in that classes folder;
This is really time consuming but past papers are my life saves open online or print out then (you can get then so easy by typing into Google eg. maths past paper aqa and you should get them and then you can find the right paper) work through them at your own pace but time your self, say that papers s supposed to take an hour and it takes you an hour and 10 minutes then you know that you have to shave off the 10 minutes I do this by setting a timer 4 for one hour our 9 minutes
0
reply
123SophieW
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
Hi I'm going into year 10 as well this is just how I revise
. Revision cards, I draw all over them wight In different colours what ever works for you
. I take ruff notes in class in my notebook and then at home when I get a chance right them up neatly re-reading them and revising them, I ether wright it in my workbook or on paper and put it in to that subjects folder
. Past papers are a life saver for me, print them from online (for free 😄) and then do them at my own pace the first time, but I am timing myself so I can see how far off I am from the limit, then the next paper I do I set a timer to shave off a few minutes each time eg it takes me 1 hour 10 minutes to do a 1 hour paper the next time I do that type paper (eg paper I) I'll set a timer for 1 hour 7 minutes so on and so on you can just look up the subject past papers and the exam board to get them get the mark scheme as well as then you can mark them and see we're you didn't get the marks to correct for next time
. Rag tests (look it up its really hard to explain)
I know this one's kind of odd but I have an envelope folder for each of my subjects, so any time I finish a project or book or something it go's into the subject folder. Then any exam I have for that I just pull out the folder and it has everything I need in it I have found this works soooooo well for me. Also if you have any A5 polly pockets A4 will be fine as well, separate all your revision cards into subject then topic etc and put each group of cards into the polly pockets sepratly so key quotes for re are in a separate one from key words. Then they go into the folder and for me at least its not so dunting to revise because its all organised.
. For RE I take this as well and I have found loads of resorses form AQA just search "AQA RE quotes for christonality" for example and there is stuff from them. I found some really good worksbooks for free online from the bible society and AQA heres the link to one of them https://educationresources.biblesoci...s-studies/aqa/
There go down and find the part saying aqa then on that page find the part that says download for free or if you did want to buy it you could buy a copy there as well.

Hope this helps, it's just what works for me. Good luck
0
reply
NinjaBurger1337
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I mean you're not gonna be doing much revision right now. I get where you're coming from because I went into A-Levels all motivated and wanted to put in 100% effort from day one but the reality it's a bit early for all that right now. You're not really going to be revising since you don't know anything yet but there's nothing bad in a few tips to give you a head start.

English lit: Get the texts you're going to be cover and read them. Don't be too analytical about it, just read the "accessible" texts first to get your head around the story, main themes and all the main aspects. Whilst you read the texts go on sparknotes and if you don't understand the story itself that should make it clear and read a bit of the analysis to get an idea of what you're supposed to be looking for and you'll get a better understanding of the literary themes present. For Shakespeare take your time with it, spark notes will be really good for this because you'll have modern English translations. Don't rely on sparknotes or copy it, to do well in the exam you should develop a level of creativity which will let you improve analysis on the spot, but you're just starting out and reading the texts so it's good to get a grasp of everything so you have a stable foundation moving forward.

English lan: I forgot this was a GCSE until like a week before the exam and I still got a 7 in it because I feel like most of the skills you need for this are developed by working on English Lit. I would suggest getting the revision guide for Lan and from what I remember you need to know how to write a set of formats like a letter or a story. Look at the guide and find out what you're supposed to do and then just practice. You can take what you write to your teachers and ask them to mark it and then just improve upon that.

French: I got a C in Spanish so my MFL advice will be short lol. This was mostly because of me not caring since I already had an A* in my own language so I wasn't incompetent, just lazy. Something small you can do in the background on a daily basis is vocab. A very rich range of vocab will be very beneficial to you especially if you do it daily for 2 years. Get some flashcards, there's probably some premade ones on quizlet or something out there. Have the English word on one side and the French word on the other and work at it. Make sure you work on translating from English to French and from French to English.

History: I'm did a different exam board to you and different time periods but I got an A* at GCSE and at A-Level so I'd say I have some useful history related advice. With history you want to go "below" the standard of your work and "above". What I mean by "below" is break down the content into something overly simple so take a single period, break it down into the key events, key dates and key people. What is mean by "above" is go outside the constraints of learning a GCSE. When I studied for my History and Politics A-Levels I looked at academic journals and books for uni students. Studying at a level above the standard which is required of you allows you to understand the topic at a higher level. Now the History GCSE doesn't require you to think much and most of it is really just remembering stuff and copying it onto the exam paper from what I remember but even if this is the case an advanced understanding of the topics allows you to more more complex connections which makes it easier to remember. I feel like textbooks present the information like a story but academic books present it as an analysis- reading the analysis just makes it stick more. Though take your time. When I went into my A-Levels I thought I was the king of the world and then I started reading the materials required for my French Revolution coursework and I questioned my ability to read properly. Now you might be smarter than me and academic books could be easy for you but take your time anyway, this is not supposed to be the core of your learning- just a supplement so it's not wroth getting confused over it.

I'll end the subject specific advice here since I either didn't do some of your subjects or I winged the others and I just don't remember any useful information for them. I literally just got an A in RE by memorising enough things in the lesson and repeating "love thy neighbour" 50 times. I got an A in science and for that I'd suggest doing the AQA workbook. My school gave it to us alongside the revision guides and it made a decent difference in my grades- forcing yourself to remember the information and present it as an answer really improves your ability to retain it. Maths... just practice tbh and take your time. Somewhat unrelated but related story: I was prepping for an Oxford entry exam and a decent part of it was maths, I was very intimidated by this so when I practised I just skipped the maths questions if I thought I didn't know them and I kept getting low scores because of this. As soon as I took my time and gave the questions a go even if I was absolutely confused by them my score shot up and when the actual exam came I got a score which landed me an interview so moral of the story: take your time with the difficult questions.

Now some memory specific advice. I researched memory techniques and put them into effect quite a lot over the course of my A-Levels so if they helped me they can help you. First of all *recognition* is not the same thing as *recall*. If you're making notes and you're making them by looking straight at your textbook you're not remembering anything. Making notes or highlighting have their place but they are possibly the most overused revision techniques ever. Making notes helps you condense the information at hand into a more comprehensive format and highlighting allows you to pick out the fundamental aspects of these notes. Lets say you need the information from one page of a textbook in your exam, unless you have perfect recall you won't remember the entire page. So you condense the page into half a page of writing. You then highlight 10 key aspects of this page and you then turn those aspects into flashcards.

The most important thing in memory is "active recall" which boils down to remembering something without seeing it. A very common and effective revision tool is writing down everything you remember about a topic without looking at any notes. So lets say you take one page of your physics revision guide, you make notes on it, you highlight some stuff, maybe you re-read a bit because you misunderstood. You then put away all that and you take a blank piece of paper and write down everything you remember. You then check what you got wrong, correct what you got wrong and try again until you reach a level which is acceptable to you. This is why exam practice is so useful, you are forced to recall all this information which strengthens your connections.

Spacing your active recognition is also important. Lets say you have a month before your exams and you're starting your revision and you already have your resources (flashcards, notes and textbooks) ready. You do the active recall exercises of one module on day one until you reach your acceptable standard, you then do it in 2 days, then 5, then 7 and then 2 weeks and then at the end of the month. Spacing out your active recall strengthens the connections in your long term memory.

I'd also suggest subscribing to some useful you tube channels. StudyTubers are really good imo, they're you tubers who vlog about studying and give advice. I personally watched Eve Bennett mostly because she's only one year ahead of me so she felt more relatable, She's not in her second year of uni so she probably wouldn't be too applicable to you but she has a lot of study vlogs for motivation and advice videos so would recommend her along with a lot of people in the community. Ali Abdaal was a medicine student at Cambridge and he has a lot of great study advice.

In terms of more life related advice: have a social life or some sort of opportunity to relax outside of working. You need something you can go to outside of school to keep up the mental health. Exercise and eat as cleanly as possible- though not to a point where is stresses you out, find a way to enjoy it. This is a very important part of studying- leading a healthy life style majorly contributes to having a clear mind and sufficient energy levels so you can study effectively. In the middle of year 13 I was suffering from tragically low energy levels to the point where I was doing no independent work when I was supposed to be doing 4 hours a day so it's important to take care of yourself.

You dedicate your life to something for two years so make sure you take your time and don't burn yourself out at any point. Set a speed you can maintain at the start. Good luck!
Last edited by NinjaBurger1337; 1 year ago
1
reply
febreze
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by NinjaBurger1337)
I mean you're not gonna be doing much revision right now. I get where you're coming from because I went into A-Levels all motivated and wanted to put in 100% effort from day one but the reality it's a bit early for all that right now. You're not really going to be revising since you don't know anything yet but there's nothing bad in a few tips to give you a head start.

English lit: Get the texts you're going to be cover and read them. Don't be too analytical about it, just read the "accessible" texts first to get your head around the story, main themes and all the main aspects. Whilst you read the texts go on sparknotes and if you don't understand the story itself that should make it clear and read a bit of the analysis to get an idea of what you're supposed to be looking for and you'll get a better understanding of the literary themes present. For Shakespeare take your time with it, spark notes will be really good for this because you'll have modern English translations. Don't rely on sparknotes or copy it, to do well in the exam you should develop a level of creativity which will let you improve analysis on the spot, but you're just starting out and reading the texts so it's good to get a grasp of everything so you have a stable foundation moving forward.

English lan: I forgot this was a GCSE until like a week before the exam and I still got a 7 in it because I feel like most of the skills you need for this are developed by working on English Lit. I would suggest getting the revision guide for Lan and from what I remember you need to know how to write a set of formats like a letter or a story. Look at the guide and find out what you're supposed to do and then just practice. You can take what you write to your teachers and ask them to mark it and then just improve upon that.

French: I got a C in Spanish so my MFL advice will be short lol. This was mostly because of me not caring since I already had an A* in my own language so I wasn't incompetent, just lazy. Something small you can do in the background on a daily basis is vocab. A very rich range of vocab will be very beneficial to you especially if you do it daily for 2 years. Get some flashcards, there's probably some premade ones on quizlet or something out there. Have the English word on one side and the French word on the other and work at it. Make sure you work on translating from English to French and from French to English.

History: I'm did a different exam board to you and different time periods but I got an A* at GCSE and at A-Level so I'd say I have some useful history related advice. With history you want to go "below" the standard of your work and "above". What I mean by "below" is break down the content into something overly simple so take a single period, break it down into the key events, key dates and key people. What is mean by "above" is go outside the constraints of learning a GCSE. When I studied for my History and Politics A-Levels I looked at academic journals and books for uni students. Studying at a level above the standard which is required of you allows you to understand the topic at a higher level. Now the History GCSE doesn't require you to think much and most of it is really just remembering stuff and copying it onto the exam paper from what I remember but even if this is the case an advanced understanding of the topics allows you to more more complex connections which makes it easier to remember. I feel like textbooks present the information like a story but academic books present it as an analysis- reading the analysis just makes it stick more. Though take your time. When I went into my A-Levels I thought I was the king of the world and then I started reading the materials required for my French Revolution coursework and I questioned my ability to read properly. Now you might be smarter than me and academic books could be easy for you but take your time anyway, this is not supposed to be the core of your learning- just a supplement so it's not wroth getting confused over it.

I'll end the subject specific advice here since I either didn't do some of your subjects or I winged the others and I just don't remember any useful information for them. I literally just got an A in RE by memorising enough things in the lesson and repeating "love thy neighbour" 50 times. I got an A in science and for that I'd suggest doing the AQA workbook. My school gave it to us alongside the revision guides and it made a decent difference in my grades- forcing yourself to remember the information and present it as an answer really improves your ability to retain it. Maths... just practice tbh and take your time. Somewhat unrelated but related story: I was prepping for an Oxford entry exam and a decent part of it was maths, I was very intimidated by this so when I practised I just skipped the maths questions if I thought I didn't know them and I kept getting low scores because of this. As soon as I took my time and gave the questions a go even if I was absolutely confused by them my score shot up and when the actual exam came I got a score which landed me an interview so moral of the story: take your time with the difficult questions.

Now some memory specific advice. I researched memory techniques and put them into effect quite a lot over the course of my A-Levels so if they helped me they can help you. First of all *recognition* is not the same thing as *recall*. If you're making notes and you're making them by looking straight at your textbook you're not remembering anything. Making notes or highlighting have their place but they are possibly the most overused revision techniques ever. Making notes helps you condense the information at hand into a more comprehensive format and highlighting allows you to pick out the fundamental aspects of these notes. Lets say you need the information from one page of a textbook in your exam, unless you have perfect recall you won't remember the entire page. So you condense the page into half a page of writing. You then highlight 10 key aspects of this page and you then turn those aspects into flashcards.

The most important thing in memory is "active recall" which boils down to remembering something without seeing it. A very common and effective revision tool is writing down everything you remember about a topic without looking at any notes. So lets say you take one page of your physics revision guide, you make notes on it, you highlight some stuff, maybe you re-read a bit because you misunderstood. You then put away all that and you take a blank piece of paper and write down everything you remember. You then check what you got wrong, correct what you got wrong and try again until you reach a level which is acceptable to you. This is why exam practice is so useful, you are forced to recall all this information which strengthens your connections.

Spacing your active recognition is also important. Lets say you have a month before your exams and you're starting your revision and you already have your resources (flashcards, notes and textbooks) ready. You do the active recall exercises of one module on day one until you reach your acceptable standard, you then do it in 2 days, then 5, then 7 and then 2 weeks and then at the end of the month. Spacing out your active recall strengthens the connections in your long term memory.

I'd also suggest subscribing to some useful you tube channels. StudyTubers are really good imo, they're you tubers who vlog about studying and give advice. I personally watched Eve Bennett mostly because she's only one year ahead of me so she felt more relatable, She's not in her second year of uni so she probably wouldn't be too applicable to you but she has a lot of study vlogs for motivation and advice videos so would recommend her along with a lot of people in the community. Ali Abdaal was a medicine student at Cambridge and he has a lot of great study advice.

In terms of more life related advice: have a social life or some sort of opportunity to relax outside of working. You need something you can go to outside of school to keep up the mental health. Exercise and eat as cleanly as possible- though not to a point where is stresses you out, find a way to enjoy it. This is a very important part of studying- leading a healthy life style majorly contributes to having a clear mind and sufficient energy levels so you can study effectively. In the middle of year 13 I was suffering from tragically low energy levels to the point where I was doing no independent work when I was supposed to be doing 4 hours a day so it's important to take care of yourself.

You dedicate your life to something for two years so make sure you take your time and don't burn yourself out at any point. Set a speed you can maintain at the start. Good luck!
thank you, do you have anything for science related revision x
0
reply
NinjaBurger1337
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by febreze)
thank you, do you have anything for science related revision x
I got a B in Core and an A in additional and I didn't take any science A-Levels so I don't have any outstanding advice.

Active recall works well for Science as it does for everything else. I used the AQA revision guides, those were good for the notes and flashcards. I found the AQA workbooks very useful, you can answer the questions without looking at the information and then correct yourself for some active recall training. Exam papers are good but you shouldn't use them early on- probably towards the second half of year 11. Exam papers are used as the holy grail for science revision because they combine active recall and exam skills whilst training you for the real thing but you don't want to use them up early so you can have enough materials to run mock exams before your actual GCSEs to polish your skills and have some realistic experience of the exam so you won't be weighted down by stress.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (127)
41.78%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (34)
11.18%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (24)
7.89%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (67)
22.04%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (33)
10.86%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (19)
6.25%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise