A level politics question help plsssss!! Going to year 12 in sept!

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lauren_dxm
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#1
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#1
Okay I need help with these questions:
The ‘confidence and supply’ agreement with the DUP will only succeed if Conservative MPs support the party line. Why is it a virtual certainty that Conservative MPs will do so, even on Brexit, despite Brexiteers fearing that the country will not get the ‘hard’ Brexit which they claim is what “the people voted for” and pro-Europeans who fear the damage to the UK’s economy that they believe anything other than a ‘soft’ Brexit will do?

Collective ministerial responsibility is a convention (i.e. a principle of expected practice) that members of the cabinet must publicly support all governmental decisions made in cabinet, even if they do not privately agree with them. If they do not do so, it is expected that they either resign from the government or are sacked by the Prime Minister. Boris Johnson, the Foreign Secretary, is the most notable example of a cabinet member who is a repeat offender for breaking this convention. This has most frequently been on the issue of Brexit. a) What is revealed about the strength and authority of May that she has not sacked Johnson? b) What is the underlying reason for your answer to Question a)? c) What is revealed about the influence of Johnson within the cabinet when he criticises government policy on Brexit outside of cabinet meetings?

Thank you for any and all help!
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sophswfc
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I do AQA Gov and Politics and am going into year 13 in September, I hope you'll find the course interesting!
-In my opinion, the Tory MPs will almost certainly follow the party line as they need to provide a show of unity. If they all voted inconsistently and showed 'factions', it tells the opposition that the 'dominant' party is in disarray and falling apart. This would then encourage them to call a 'motion of no confidence' to the Commons where all the MPs vote on if they have confidence in the current government to deliver the mandate (whats set out in the party manifesto that the people have voted for). This would be disastrous for the Tories and most MPs would rather vote for something they don't necessarily believe in (ie a no deal Brexit if they were a staunch remainer) in order to show they're on the same page and that they have confidence in the government to deliver whatever kind of Brexit better than the opposition would.

-A) May has little authority and a small amount of MPs willing to back her in cabinet, so she must hold onto the ones she can. B) Boris is a senior member of the party with a wealth of experience. It pays to have him onside for May as he is somewhat respected. C) I would say it shows less about Johnson and more about cabinet as a whole. It shows that cabinet cannot be ruled by an individual and while ALL members are supposed to agree or get lost, it does show that majority rules. I'd argue that it could even show that Boris feels a bit of invincibility that he can criticise the government and break CMR and get away with it.

If all that is wrong I sincerely apologise, but that's definitely how I'd go about answering those questions
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lauren_dxm
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(Original post by sophswfc)
I do AQA Gov and Politics and am going into year 13 in September, I hope you'll find the course interesting!
-In my opinion, the Tory MPs will almost certainly follow the party line as they need to provide a show of unity. If they all voted inconsistently and showed 'factions', it tells the opposition that the 'dominant' party is in disarray and falling apart. This would then encourage them to call a 'motion of no confidence' to the Commons where all the MPs vote on if they have confidence in the current government to deliver the mandate (whats set out in the party manifesto that the people have voted for). This would be disastrous for the Tories and most MPs would rather vote for something they don't necessarily believe in (ie a no deal Brexit if they were a staunch remainer) in order to show they're on the same page and that they have confidence in the government to deliver whatever kind of Brexit better than the opposition would.

-A) May has little authority and a small amount of MPs willing to back her in cabinet, so she must hold onto the ones she can. B) Boris is a senior member of the party with a wealth of experience. It pays to have him onside for May as he is somewhat respected. C) I would say it shows less about Johnson and more about cabinet as a whole. It shows that cabinet cannot be ruled by an individual and while ALL members are supposed to agree or get lost, it does show that majority rules. I'd argue that it could even show that Boris feels a bit of invincibility that he can criticise the government and break CMR and get away with it.

If all that is wrong I sincerely apologise, but that's definitely how I'd go about answering those questions
Omg this course is so confusing but thank you for your detailed answer!
Can you please give me any and all revision advice for politics A level and what I should start doing from day 1 or even from now to secure the higher grades.
Also in your frees do you do homework or revision as I just want an idea of how to go about them myself.
Thanks again for your reply
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sophswfc
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(Original post by lauren_dxm)
Omg this course is so confusing but thank you for your detailed answer!
Can you please give me any and all revision advice for politics A level and what I should start doing from day 1 or even from now to secure the higher grades.
Also in your frees do you do homework or revision as I just want an idea of how to go about them myself.
Thanks again for your reply
No problem at all!!
The course is very knowledge based. Are you doing AQA?
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lauren_dxm
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(Original post by sophswfc)
No problem at all!!
The course is very knowledge based. Are you doing AQA?
Yes I am doing aqa
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sophswfc
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(Original post by lauren_dxm)
Yes I am doing aqa
Okay thats good my advice will match then.
As I said, the course is very knowledge based. A lot of your marks in the exams comes from 'AO1' marks, which are knowledge marks. This means you have to pad your answers with as much specific knowledge around that topic as you can. For example, if you were talking about the Lord Chancellor losing their input in the appointment of Supreme Court judges, you should definitely mention this was a reform that came as a result of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 (I know this all sounds alien atm but trust me, when you learn about it you'll think back to this and think 'ooohhh thats what she meant ' ahahah).

Revision advice:
-flashcards are insanely helpful for the knowledge parts of the course. Easy to use, good for lists eg. 'give 6 powers that the president has'.
-mind maps are good for debating/comparative topics-means you can branch out your ideas
-ESSAY PLANS-this is soooo crucial. To have score good marks (20+) on a 25 mark essay, a really good idea is to have planned as many essays as possible before hand. Then, if the question shows up in a mock/the real thing, your brain is already half prepared.

Revise as you go along. I didn't, and its the worst mistake I made. Politics is a jam packed course, you really need to keep on top of it.

Im sure you'll do fine!
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lauren_dxm
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#7
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(Original post by sophswfc)
Okay thats good my advice will match then.
As I said, the course is very knowledge based. A lot of your marks in the exams comes from 'AO1' marks, which are knowledge marks. This means you have to pad your answers with as much specific knowledge around that topic as you can. For example, if you were talking about the Lord Chancellor losing their input in the appointment of Supreme Court judges, you should definitely mention this was a reform that came as a result of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 (I know this all sounds alien atm but trust me, when you learn about it you'll think back to this and think 'ooohhh thats what she meant ' ahahah).

Revision advice:
-flashcards are insanely helpful for the knowledge parts of the course. Easy to use, good for lists eg. 'give 6 powers that the president has'.
-mind maps are good for debating/comparative topics-means you can branch out your ideas
-ESSAY PLANS-this is soooo crucial. To have score good marks (20+) on a 25 mark essay, a really good idea is to have planned as many essays as possible before hand. Then, if the question shows up in a mock/the real thing, your brain is already half prepared.

Revise as you go along. I didn't, and its the worst mistake I made. Politics is a jam packed course, you really need to keep on top of it.

Im sure you'll do fine!
Thank you so much for your help!!
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