aqsahussain12
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What is Spanish like for alevel? As I know it is very different to GCSE Spanish but how is it different ?
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Dunya
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It doesn't matter if you got an A* for any subject during GCSEs, A-Levels is a ruthless creature that will teach you differently.

Firstly you'll study 2 pieces of Spanish literature, either a play, book, or film. You will have 2 essay questions to answer about the texts.
A 20-minute speaking exam based on a Spanish related topic of your own choice. 1 unseen card will be included as well.
A reading and listening paper, probably the most difficult out of the 3.

Feel free to ask any questions. I can answer specifically for AQA.
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aqsahussain12
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(Original post by Dunya)
It doesn't matter if you got an A* for any subject during GCSEs, A-Levels is a ruthless creature that will teach you differently.

Firstly you'll study 2 pieces of Spanish literature, either a play, book, or film. You will have 2 essay questions to answer about the texts.
A 20-minute speaking exam based on a Spanish related topic of your own choice. 1 unseen card will be included as well.
A reading and listening paper, probably the most difficult out of the 3.

Feel free to ask any questions. I can answer specifically for AQA.
I found out I am doing my exams with AQA and I am studying a book and a film called volver (I’m not too sure about the book) and I was just wondering whether you have any advice on how to stay on top of it to get the best grades I can get.
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username4310824
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(Original post by aqsahussain12)
What is Spanish like for alevel? As I know it is very different to GCSE Spanish but how is it different ?
A-level languages are tough but definitely doable as long as you stay organised.

I always say that the most important thing to realise about A-level Spanish is that it isn't a subject where you can just cram everything a month or two before the exam. You really have to be consistent with your revision right from the beginning and make sure that you're staying on top of your vocab and grammar learning.

For learning vocab, I'd really recommend the sites Quizlet and Memrise. Both of these sites have a lot of pre-made A-level Spanish sets that you can use to revise or you can make your own. When I was doing A-level Spanish I used to read newspapers and articles online and highlight all the words I didn't know and put them in a Quizlet set to learn them and it was very helpful.

For the speaking exam, you'll be expected to do an ''Independent Research Project'' on a Spanish related topic you're interested in. You'll spend the first 5 minutes of the exam giving your presentation and then the next 10 minutes being asked questions about it by the examiner. You're not allowed to read your presentation off of a piece of paper or computer screen but you are allowed to bring in a few bullet points to help jog your memory whilst you're doing it. I'd advise you to start thinking about what you'd like to do your project on as early as possible so that you can get prepared. You can read more about it here.

After the presentation you'll then be given a card relating to a theme you've studied over the past two years. If you scroll down you can see examples of some here. One of the main things the examiners will be looking for here is your cultural knowledge therefore it is important that you stay up to date on current affairs in Spain or Latin America and that you know quite a bit about the cultures. For this, I'd recommend reading Spanish newspapers such as El País or El Mundo.

For the writing exam I'd highly recommend this revision guide. You'll be expected to analyse the film and book you study to a similar standard as a B/C grade GCSE English literature exam (but in Spanish). The way I revised for this was pretty much the same way I revised for GCSE English lit i.e making notes about the different characters and themes, picking out quotes that I could analyse and link back to certain characters/themes, doing practise essays, etc. Your quality of written Spanish is also very important here. It's essential that you have a good range of vocabulary and are able to use complex grammar structures if you want to reach the higher grades.

There are some great resources on Youtube for listening practice. Videos like these are particularly useful (they also have videos for beginners/advanced if you find that too difficult/easy). If you search you should be able to find similar things made for learners to practise listening. You also might find it useful to watch things like Spanish kids shows as they usually don't speak as quickly and the vocabulary won't be too complex.

Once you've settled into the course, make sure you're regularly practising with past papers too. Have a look through the mark schemes and examiner reports you know exactly what the examiners are looking for and what mistakes commonly made in previous years to avoid.

I hope this helps! It does sound like quite a lot to manage but honestly it isn't too bad. I remember when I first started A-level Spanish and I was told that I was going to have to write a full essay completely in Spanish by the end of it I was absolutely terrified and thought that there was no way that I would be able to do it, but I did! You improve so much and so quickly over the two years that you'll look back at your GCSE Spanish papers at the end of it and wonder what you found so difficult

If you have any questions please ask
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