Difference between the Pope now and the Pope in Tudor England

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liaente
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Title please.
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Telamonian Ajax
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The Popes during the Tudor times are dead. The current one isn't

In all seriousness, I like the history of the Papacy, but I know not enough about it to answer your question.
I suppose you could simply say that the renaissance Popes had more authority, being a time where religiosity was taken very seriously.
The old Popes also had powers that could instate monarchs and excommunicate them (don't know if the current one still exercises excommunication) Take Alexander VI and his crowning of Charles VIII of France as King of Naples. Quite simply, the fact people were more religious then means that the pope was an incredibly powerful figure, arguably the most powerful in Europe. Of course, that authority began to wane throughout the reformation.
Last edited by Telamonian Ajax; 1 year ago
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AngryJellyfish
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The Tudor pope *probably* had two lungs.
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harrysbar
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It used to seem like a more appealing career choice
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Telamonian Ajax
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(Original post by AngryJellyfish)
The Tudor pope *probably* had two lungs.
Probably had two mistresses also.
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Telamonian Ajax
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Come to think of it, most 16th century popes came from noble families such as the Medici, nowadays, they have more modest backgrounds.
Most of them would have been Italian also, I believe pope John Paul II was the first non-Italian in hundreds of years.
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TudorhistoryGod
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The biggest difference is the power that the Pope had in the Tudor period (specifically pre-1533 Tudor England to now). The Pope has no power over England now, simply because we are not a recognized Catholic country, but rather we are Church of England, and this is where the Tudor period comes in. Look up the Act of Annates, Act in restraint of Appeals and Act of supremacy, all in 1533, and that will explain the lack of papal power in the 21st century.
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