Do we learn enough about the environment in schools?

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04MR17
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Now of course, Geography, along with Science include important topics about nature, the environment and our planet when taught in UK schools - both at Primary and secondary level. But is this enough?

Do you feel as though what you were taught at school has helped form your knowledge and opinions about issues like climate change, about how to engage with wildlife and about what we can each do to reduce our environmental impact?

Should schools try to address these issues more?
Or does the rapidly unfolding events of the world's climate and our expanding scientific knowledge mean that what we tell our children may become very quickly out of date?

What would be the best way to include these topics in subjects outside of the traditional sciences?

Post your thoughts below.


This thread is part of TSR Goes Green! A project all about nature and the environment. You can get involved in other threads about it by clicking here.
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yaja_jaswal
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Now of course, Geography, along with Science include important topics about nature, the environment and our planet when taught in UK schools - both at Primary and secondary level. But is this enough?

Do you feel as though what you were taught at school has helped form your knowledge and opinions about issues like climate change, about how to engage with wildlife and about what we can each do to reduce our environmental impact?

Should schools try to address these issues more?
Or does the rapidly unfolding events of the world's climate and our expanding scientific knowledge mean that what we tell our children may become very quickly out of date?

What would be the best way to include these topics in subjects outside of the traditional sciences?

Post your thoughts below.


[field defaultattr=]This thread is part of TSR Goes Green! A project all about nature and the environment. You can get involved in other threads about it by clicking here.[/field]
Simple answer: no.

Unless you're doing geography or something related you hardly learn about the environment at all. Not in PSHE (life learning if you don't have that where you're from), which realistically it should be. It is a huge topic which is very much relevant, but the people making lessons plans don't seem to think its an issue.

On the other hand, what you said about information becoming out of date is also an issue. I would say it is better for children to learn online where articles are published all the time. The key thing would be teaching children the basics and giving them reliable sources so they can see for themselves. If they try to look for themselves for the first time they may read misinformation.
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Tolgash
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It's mainly taught in chemistry, biology and geography (two of which will be studied up until the end of the fifth form and one that is quite popular amongst pupils). In the sixth form, those that study chemistry and biology will have some exposure, while those in geography will learn a lot about it (e.g. OCR's third paper has entire sections dedicated to climate change, although these are optional). We even have a course at A Level called 'environmental science', which just about explains itself really.

I think we do.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
It's mainly taught in chemistry, biology and geography (two of which will be studied up until the end of the fifth form and one that is quite popular amongst pupils). In the sixth form, those that study chemistry and biology will have some exposure, while those in geography will learn a lot about it (e.g. OCR's third paper has entire sections dedicated to climate change, although these are optional). We even have a course at A Level called 'environmental science', which just about explains itself really.

I think we do.
But is the scientific content of 2 science disciplines broad enough to cover all of the things involved with studying the environment? Including the politics around it and the social consequences of environmental change? I would argue these are not inherently scientific and therefore we need something else which could include them.
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Valeriex
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No. We are living in an emergency. Just because your passion isn't Geography or Science doesn't mean you shouldn't be taught. For example if you are into languages you should still know about the state of the planet. The news don't report it enough so it really is up to schools or for you to do your own research
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Tolgash
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(Original post by 04MR17)
But is the scientific content of 2 science disciplines broad enough to cover all of the things involved with studying the environment? Including the politics around it and the social consequences of environmental change? I would argue these are not inherently scientific and therefore we need something else which could include them.
Geography includes them. If students really care, they'll go out of their way to research more about the topic (this can partly be done by opting to study geography at KS4 and beyond, and/or environmental science at KS5 and beyond). I think that the students need to know the science behind different aspects of the environment so that they are not manipulated by propaganda or other forms of pseudoscience, but anything political can be left up to themselves. Based on the scientific knowledge they should have acquired, they can make a decision of what should be done next and look into how politics is treating environmental issues.
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Leviathan1611
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school is doing enough.
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Obolinda
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No.
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Labrador99
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Now of course, Geography, along with Science include important topics about nature, the environment and our planet when taught in UK schools - both at Primary and secondary level. But is this enough?

Do you feel as though what you were taught at school has helped form your knowledge and opinions about issues like climate change, about how to engage with wildlife and about what we can each do to reduce our environmental impact?

Should schools try to address these issues more?
Or does the rapidly unfolding events of the world's climate and our expanding scientific knowledge mean that what we tell our children may become very quickly out of date?

What would be the best way to include these topics in subjects outside of the traditional sciences?

Post your thoughts below.


This thread is part of TSR Goes Green! A project all about nature and the environment. You can get involved in other threads about it by clicking here.
No, you learn hardly any of it in school, except a little in geography/biology, but that was after picking subjects, so not everyone will have picked those...I think that part of the problem (as with a lot of things that have a scientific basis...and equally, same could be said about other subjects, like languages in primary school) is that non specialist teachers don't necessarily know much about it, so avoid it
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