Vetrix42
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Afternoon,

I'm going into Year 12 and I was wondering how someone would approach studying Physics, Psychology, Sports Studies & Biology and revision methods.
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p_helena
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(Original post by Vetrix42)
Afternoon,

I'm going into Year 12 and I was wondering how someone would approach studying Physics, Psychology, Sports Studies & Biology and revision methods.
Doing 4 A-Levels is hard, so first things first, if it gets to week 5 and you feel like you're drowning, honestly drop one. No uni requires 4 A-levels and I've seen it time and time again where people go for quantity not quality (i.e. get lower grades on all 4 subjects when they would have done much better with 3).

That aside, basically make sure you go over your notes every day. Find a method of revision that works for you- I took notes in class and turned them into diagrams where possible. I also did loads of past paper questions as that helped me improve my exam technique.
I did A-Level Biology and there is a LOT of content that you have to cover- make sure that you do write ups for core practicals, it will save you a lot of stress!
Spend time with your mates but don't allow a 2 hour free period to turn into a 2 hour gossip/gaming sesh. Have 1/2 hour of friendly banter and spend the rest of the time working. You won't have much to do in the first couple of weeks- after this it will ramp up.
The best way to do well at A-Level is to avoid complacency but give yourself time to breathe.
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Farhana001
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(Original post by p_helena)
Doing 4 A-Levels is hard, so first things first, if it gets to week 5 and you feel like you're drowning, honestly drop one. No uni requires 4 A-levels and I've seen it time and time again where people go for quantity not quality (i.e. get lower grades on all 4 subjects when they would have done much better with 3).

That aside, basically make sure you go over your notes every day. Find a method of revision that works for you- I took notes in class and turned them into diagrams where possible. I also did loads of past paper questions as that helped me improve my exam technique.
I did A-Level Biology and there is a LOT of content that you have to cover- make sure that you do write ups for core practicals, it will save you a lot of stress!
Spend time with your mates but don't allow a 2 hour free period to turn into a 2 hour gossip/gaming sesh. Have 1/2 hour of friendly banter and spend the rest of the time working. You won't have much to do in the first couple of weeks- after this it will ramp up.
The best way to do well at A-Level is to avoid complacency but give yourself time to breathe.
Hi I’m going into year 13 and wondering if you had any tips for a level bio?
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p_helena
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(Original post by Farhana001)
Hi I’m going into year 13 and wondering if you had any tips for a level bio?
Oof this is gonna be a long one (sorry!)

So the thing with Biology (I did Edexcel, context-led course) is that there are one or two tricky parts which are technically confusing (e.g. action potentials in nerves, photosynthesis and respiration), but most of it is pretty logical. The thing that makes Biology so hard is the sheer volume of content. I had 8 topics plus 18 Core Practicals, and for each I required knowing the full method and write-up. On top of this, the exam questions are worded in a pretty nasty way- they will sometimes hide that they want a method for a core practical (e.g. a 9-mark question in my paper this year!)
The best way to succeed is to just keep doing little bits. Make sure you get Core Practicals written up as soon as you do them. This link has all the core practicals for Edexcel, so you can read up on them beforehand:
https://snabbiology.wordpress.com/tag/core-practicals/

Some of the fundamentals covered in year 12 are absolutely essential for year 13. Make sure you have protein synthesis nailed- if you don't, make some diagrams/notes and go over it until it makes sense. Check mark schemes for the sort of terminology that the exam board wants. For example, if you're answering a question on how the tertiary structure of a protein is formed, avoid general language like "intermolecular forces arise between R groups on the amino acids". Instead, say something along the lines of "hydrogen bonding between polar R groups forms the secondary structure" etc. Try and make sure that your long answers are in a logical order and are as concise as possible.

But most importantly, all the crazy amounts of info won't go in your brain if you panic. If you are stressed about anything, talk to your teachers as they may be able to help you. My Bio teacher was very strict which made me worry about deadlines when I had personal problems- I talked to her and she was a massive help.
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