yeetmeister2
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Hi all,
Since I wanted to study economics during the middle of year 12 it was too late for me to do further maths. I am thinking of applying for economics at Oxford, LSE, UCL, Warwick and Queen Mary. Since i really want to apply to LSE (but i dont know if this will be a waste of an application) am I likely to get an offer if i have a strong personal statement and 3A* prediction grades ( or 2A* and A prediction grade with the A in physics). I do a level maths, physics and economics. is it worth me applying to study economics at lse without further maths but with these predicted grades and a good personal statement?
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ayyyy.x
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I would go for it. Universities look mostly at your personal statement, predicted grades and your teacher references.
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artful_lounger
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It's only one option, ultimately, but bear in mind the majority (something like 85%) of successful applicants to single honours economics at LSE have FM. So while you can apply, don't bank on it being successful.

I gather it is less important (and common) for those applying to the joint honours courses with economics (in non-mathematical subjects, i.e. PPE etc). Since you study the same amount of economics in any of the economics courses at Oxford (E&M, PPE, Economics & History - maximum 6 papers in economics, 1 in first year and up to 5 in finals; I think Economics & History actually have an extra economics paper in economic history on top of those 5 other potential economics papers), if you are presumably wanting to target Oxford primarily, perhaps you could look at PPE or E&H at Oxford, and relevant joint honours courses at LSE which you may be more likely to get into.
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yeetmeister2
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It's only one option, ultimately, but bear in mind the majority (something like 85%) of successful applicants to single honours economics at LSE have FM. So while you can apply, don't bank on it being successful.

I gather it is less important (and common) for those applying to the joint honours courses with economics (in non-mathematical subjects, i.e. PPE etc). Since you study the same amount of economics in any of the economics courses at Oxford (E&M, PPE, Economics & History - maximum 6 papers in economics, 1 in first year and up to 5 in finals; I think Economics & History actually have an extra economics paper in economic history on top of those 5 other potential economics papers), if you are presumably wanting to target Oxford primarily, perhaps you could look at PPE or E&H at Oxford, and relevant joint honours courses at LSE which you may be more likely to get into.
oh ok thanks for your reply. do you know if i am likely to get into the other universities i am applying to: Oxford, UCL, Warwick and Queen Mary. And also do you know anyone or has there been any cases that people have got into LSE economics without further maths?
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Zain4000
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Connor McCormack
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by yeetmeister2)
oh ok thanks for your reply. do you know if i am likely to get into the other universities i am applying to: Oxford, UCL, Warwick and Queen Mary. And also do you know anyone or has there been any cases that people have got into LSE economics without further maths?
Well, about 10-15% of A-level applicants get in without FM each year. I would suspect those are more likely to be applicants whose schools don't offer FM and they have no other way of taking it.

Warwick has quite a mathematical course so I imagine they favour FM, and I've heard it's quite common for those applying to UCL; those two along with Cambridge and LSE form the more mathematical/theoretical single honours economics courses I'm aware of.

Oxford I doubt it will make much difference if you're applying to PPE, perhaps for E&M (not because the content is necessarily different, but because it's such an enormously competitive course to start with). Economics & History at Oxford seems to take plenty without FM, as well as quite a few with; I imagine it's not a critical factor for that course either. As I said, bear in mind you take the same amount of economics in all the econ joint schools at Oxford; E&M is not a "single honours economics" course, contrary to popular belief.

QMUL I doubt will care at all.
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