No one cares about the working class Watch

Waldorf67
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This is something I notice a lot.

A lot of left wing media outlets, give so much of a focus on support for LGBT rights, for ethnic minorities and cultural diversity, for women’s rights and men’s rights. And don’t get me wrong, that is so important.

However a lot of the time that support is geared to the middle class. You hear from well educated, asexual arts students, to strong and powerful feminists working in the stem sector.

However so very rarely do you hear support and recognition for people working their asses off to stay on the breadline. They don’t tick a box for anything special, they are just ordinary.

You just don’t hear it. Lower income is associated with an increased risk of a range of mental disorders, and life can be tough and stressful. But no one gives them dues.

I think that’s why a lot of the working class people feel disenchanted with Labour. It feels like it’s more for the champagne socialists than the working man.

And a lot just can’t relate to the left wing media any more.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this?
Last edited by Waldorf67; 5 months ago
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A giant chicken
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yeah i hate the working classes


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z-hog
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
This is something I notice a lot.
They're the 'chattering classes' and look down on anyone not reciting their cod-philosophy. They've very fond of their phoney education and find it their duty to enlighten the masses by divine appointment, the zeal is the same as that displayed by Christian missionaries in the past. The problem you allude to is a direct consequence of that, they are not in the business of journalism anymore and for that reason standards have been dragged down to the gutter by them. We are to be educated by them whether we like it or not, that is the way the BBC/Guardian regard everything outside their ivory towers. Personally, I find most of them parasitical windbags no good for anything.

It's a growing problem, the divide between the type and the people in the streets. Contempt for the whole lot has been growing steadily over the years and little things lik ethe romping to victory by the Brexit party and the election of populist movements in Europe are there to demonstrate it. Trump is a good example of how to kick them in the teeth too, leaving them in tear and outraged at the 'stupidity' of the people. Boris should just crash the bus, end of.
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noonelid
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Labour is a bit of a misnomer in the current times.
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looloo2134
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The Guardian always has posts about working class people and working class people come in all shapes and sizes they are LBQT male female etc. So when people talk about human rights that includes working class people.
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FailingmyGCSE
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Interesting discussion. One thing I have noticed is that when we do discuss the working class, we use euphemisms such as "disadvantaged". It seems that when talking about being working-class it's almost inherently bad and that social mobility is the solution to the plight of poverty. As a working-class person myself, it seems like the greatest achievement of a working-class person is to move up the social ladder into the middle or elite class (via education, university, landing a good job, etc).
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ByEeek
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You are right. Trouble is, how do you define the working classes? Once upon a time, if you worked in industry you were the working class. And this group were well supported by unions, labour groups and other politically focused organisations.

All of that has gone. The working classes as you say are under represented mainly because they have been dispersed into all aspects of the economy without any for of central representation.

The working classes are not supported because they don't represent themselves.
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username4914582
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More representation of working class people is incredibly important, as it is generally the poorest who suffer the most from major issues such as climate change, austerity, and decreasing social mobility, all of which are obviously key left-wing issues. However, members of the LGBTQ community - as with other social groups you mention - can also be working class, the two are not necessarily mutually exclusive. As I believe another response mentions, the poor lack a singular group or movement to represent them, and are a far more disparate demographic. This creates an issue, as the working class cannot speak with a singular voice. Perhaps the best way to increase representation is to reduce university fees, and offer more scholarships to working class people, so that there are more skilled university graduates of working class backgrounds in the news media. Over time, by increasing representation in this manner, more working class people can become editors or enter positions where they can determine the sort of content being produced.
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mnot
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
This is something I notice a lot.

A lot of left wing media outlets, give so much of a focus on support for LGBT rights, for ethnic minorities and cultural diversity, for women’s rights and men’s rights. And don’t get me wrong, that is so important.

However a lot of the time that support is geared to the middle class. You hear from well educated, asexual arts students, to strong and powerful feminists working in the stem sector.

However so very rarely do you hear support and recognition for people working their asses off to stay on the breadline. They don’t tick a box for anything special, they are just ordinary.

You just don’t hear it. Lower income is associated with an increased risk of a range of mental disorders, and life can be tough and stressful. But no one gives them dues.

I think that’s why a lot of the working class people feel disenchanted with Labour. It feels like it’s more for the champagne socialists than the working man.

And a lot just can’t relate to the left wing media any more.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this?
I find that most 'working class' people tend to now support the tories (at least where I live). They just want to live their life work hard, money for the house, van, and the pub etc. and the government to enable them to do this as seamlessly as possible.

I would say discussion about everyday brits tends to cover both working & middle class brits tho, and yes conversation around these groups is limited, and enabling them to help people with everyday life. I would say modern journalism is based in central London, totally unrepresentative of 'normal folk' hence its never covered by the bbc etc.
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angelike1
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its because we are responsible for the 40% income tax put on the middle class...
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