ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
For a career with the sciences, I don't know which two to take and would quite like to do all three and maths, but can't at the IB. At the moment I've found more 'advantages' to the IB, such as apparently it keeps your options open and makes you stand out in uni applications and gives you a better chance to get in. Have you guys found this to be true, or is the IB not worth it for university benefits? Do you regret doing the IB and think I should do A levels?
0
reply
slin2018
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
**not an IB student but** I wouldn't say the IB necessarily makes it easier for you to get into uni. I do A Levels and out of my friends some do A Levels and others do IB, and a lot of us got into the same unis (some even for the same courses!). I think the main advantage is that it keeps your options open, a lot of my friends weren't sure if they wanted to study arts/social sciences/sciences/languages at uni so they did the IB. Also, CAS, TOK and the extended essay provide great opportunities to further develop your skills beyond just your subjects. I mainly chose to do A Levels as social sciences are my strongest area, and having to do a science with IB would have probably made my overall grades suffer.
1
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by slin2018)
**not an IB student but** I wouldn't say the IB necessarily makes it easier for you to get into uni. I do A Levels and out of my friends some do A Levels and others do IB, and a lot of us got into the same unis (some even for the same courses!). I think the main advantage is that it keeps your options open, a lot of my friends weren't sure if they wanted to study arts/social sciences/sciences/languages at uni so they did the IB. Also, CAS, TOK and the extended essay provide great opportunities to further develop your skills beyond just your subjects. I mainly chose to do A Levels as social sciences are my strongest area, and having to do a science with IB would have probably made my overall grades suffer.
Thanks! As for keeping my options open, I'm worried that I'll have to give up on one of the sciences and regret it later. Did your friends manage to use any of their standard levels to get into uni then? and which alevels did you take?
0
reply
slin2018
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by ayerf5)
Thanks! As for keeping my options open, I'm worried that I'll have to give up on one of the sciences and regret it later. Did your friends manage to use any of their standard levels to get into uni then? and which alevels did you take?
I think the only case is one of my friends who was able to meet an Economics course's entry requirements with a 7 in SL Maths, but other than that generally only your HL subjects are really looked at. If you know you really want to do sciences then I would honestly lean more towards A Levels since you could do the three plus Maths. I did Maths, Economics, History and an AS in Sociology.
0
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
ok thanks, I am really thinking about a levels now!
0
reply
Sportacus
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
I did the IB and oh man, run far far away from it lol. If you're sure about what you want to do at uni, the A-Levels are a much better option. I feel like the amount of effort you put into the IB doing things like CAS, the EE, and TOK can be transferred to the smaller number of subjects you do for the A Levels and it'll give you much better results.
0
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
wow that scares me 😂 I'm pretty sure I'm unlikely to want to do anything at uni that is English or humanity based, and after the first few days at an IB school I might try to move and do 3 sciences and maths at a level. do you think it's worth the hassle etc to move to another school to avoid the IB? 😂
0
reply
Sportacus
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
I mean, I would definitely give that advice to younger me if I could go back in time, but everyone has different working styles so you never know. Also, your HL IB subjects are usually worth college credits (as long as you get the fancy 6 or 7), which can be a big plus point if you're looking outside the UK for uni as well. If you do plan on doing the IB, I'd say make sure you know what you're doing. Maybe ask someone you know who's done the IB, or check out places like reddit where you can find a lot of IB students. I kind of stumbled through the IB like a drunk elephant trampling everywhere, but that may have not been the case if I'd asked more people about what I was getting myself into. Then again, my school was pretty **** at informing us about everything, so there's that. Either way, best of luck!
0
reply
angelinahx
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
I did one semester of the IB in my home country and then moved to the UK to do A-levels. I much preferred the IB, but that's just me.
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
For going into STEM subjects, I'd probably suggest A-levels just because you'll be more focused on the relevant subject matter immediately. If you know you want to go into e.g. physics, maths, biochemistry etc, I think focusing on developing the strongest background you can in three relevant STEM subjects (e.g. bio/chem/maths, phys/maths/FM, phys/chem/maths possibly with FM) would put you in a much stronger position once you actually start the degree course.

That said there are some exceptions; I think IB is good preparation for medicine, as you'll learn to manage a very heavy workload and also develop the ability to write essays along with your scientific subjects. Likewise for subjects combining aspects of the "arts" and the "sciences", such as human sciences, archaeology, or perhaps psychology, the broader range of transferable skills you develop outweighs the depth in one particular area you lose. I also found it useful going into engineering, as I had pretty good academic writing skills outside of just writing lab reports. That said I'd still probably recommend A-levels for engineering so you can take FM.

Note the above is all with respect to how you deal with the course once you're on it; as far as admissions goes, there is no preference between the two provided you get the appropriate grades.
0
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#11
(Original post by Sportacus)
I mean, I would definitely give that advice to younger me if I could go back in time, but everyone has different working styles so you never know. Also, your HL IB subjects are usually worth college credits (as long as you get the fancy 6 or 7), which can be a big plus point if you're looking outside the UK for uni as well. If you do plan on doing the IB, I'd say make sure you know what you're doing. Maybe ask someone you know who's done the IB, or check out places like reddit where you can find a lot of IB students. I kind of stumbled through the IB like a drunk elephant trampling everywhere, but that may have not been the case if I'd asked more people about what I was getting myself into. Then again, my school was pretty **** at informing us about everything, so there's that. Either way, best of luck!
Haha, yes I've asked a few people what it involves, and tbh I'm not sure if I want to do all the extra stuff when I could just do the A-levels I like! and thanks
0
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by angelinahx)
I did one semester of the IB in my home country and then moved to the UK to do A-levels. I much preferred the IB, but that's just me.
ah ok, why do you think you liked the IB more?
0
reply
ayerf5
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#13
(Original post by artful_lounger)
For going into STEM subjects, I'd probably suggest A-levels just because you'll be more focused on the relevant subject matter immediately. If you know you want to go into e.g. physics, maths, biochemistry etc, I think focusing on developing the strongest background you can in three relevant STEM subjects (e.g. bio/chem/maths, phys/maths/FM, phys/chem/maths possibly with FM) would put you in a much stronger position once you actually start the degree course.

That said there are some exceptions; I think IB is good preparation for medicine, as you'll learn to manage a very heavy workload and also develop the ability to write essays along with your scientific subjects. Likewise for subjects combining aspects of the "arts" and the "sciences", such as human sciences, archaeology, or perhaps psychology, the broader range of transferable skills you develop outweighs the depth in one particular area you lose. I also found it useful going into engineering, as I had pretty good academic writing skills outside of just writing lab reports. That said I'd still probably recommend A-levels for engineering so you can take FM.

Note the above is all with respect to how you deal with the course once you're on it; as far as admissions goes, there is no preference between the two provided you get the appropriate grades.
thank you, I am keen on stem subjects, although I think I'd do triple science and maths rather than further maths. But yeah, I can still see lots of advantages to the IB like the points that you said, a tricky decision!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top

University open days

  • Durham University
    Pre-Application Open Days Undergraduate
    Sat, 21 Sep '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 21 Sep '19
  • Loughborough University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 21 Sep '19

Are you attending a Global Climate Strike?

Yes, I'm striking (8)
6.4%
No, but I wanted to/I support the cause (70)
56%
No (47)
37.6%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise