Medical_101
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Hello, just wondering what you actually do during an intercalated Bcs. I know you "take a year out to study something in depth" but what does this actually mean practically?
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replyplzbish
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(Original post by Medical_101)
Hello, just wondering what you actually do during an intercalated Bcs. I know you "take a year out to study something in depth" but what does this actually mean practically?
it's a year in the middle of dentistry/ med/ vet degree where you can have a break to get a BSc in 1 year. So in medicine you study so many different topics. And if you especially love neuroscience, or medical education, or biochemistry etc. you could take a year to get a degree in one of these. Sometimes you are joining the 3rd year of a degree programme and other times it's a separate programme run just for intercalating students.
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Medical_101
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(Original post by replyplzbish)
it's a year in the middle of dentistry/ med/ vet degree where you can have a break to get a BSc in 1 year. So in medicine you study so many different topics. And if you especially love neuroscience, or medical education, or biochemistry etc. you could take a year to get a degree in one of these. Sometimes you are joining the 3rd year of a degree programme and other times it's a separate programme run just for intercalating students.
Ah yes thanks Im actually interested in one of the anatomy topics. But how do we study? Do we have lectures or just do our own research? Do they tell us what to do?
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replyplzbish
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(Original post by Medical_101)
Ah yes thanks Im actually interested in one of the anatomy topics. But how do we study? Do we have lectures or just do our own research? Do they tell us what to do?
I'm not 100% sure but pretty certain it is just the same as if you were doing a normal course. You have some lectures and some of your own research. If you do an MSci when you intercalate, perhaps it is a lot more independent.
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Medical_101
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(Original post by replyplzbish)
I'm not 100% sure but pretty certain it is just the same as if you were doing a normal course. You have some lectures and some of your own research. If you do an MSci when you intercalate, perhaps it is a lot more independent.
Thanks for that
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St George's University of London
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(Original post by Medical_101)
Hello, just wondering what you actually do during an intercalated Bcs. I know you "take a year out to study something in depth" but what does this actually mean practically?
Hi!

I'm a 4th year Medical Student at St. George's and I am currently intercalating in Neuroscience. I had similar questions when I was applying, so hopefully I can provide some guidance to clear things up!

So intercalating is basically taking a year out to focus on something a bit more specific and maybe even get involved with research. For Neuroscience we have lectures once or twice a week and also a dissertation to do (this is optional, you can either do a dissertation or another 15 credit module to compensate). The course is split into 3 modules which is lecture and in-course assessment based (basically like coursework!). I understand you are interested in Anatomy and one of my friends is intercalating in that. They usually have a day in the dissecting room, lectures and of course you have self directed learning time where you look into research articles to consolidate your understanding.

I think the main difference between an intercalation and Medicine is that you really go into the depths of that course, so for anatomy you would delve into the developmental aspect, clinical anatomy and there is also a module based on the Musculoskeletal/Orthopaedic system. You will be given teaching covering these things thoroughly as opposed to Medicine where maybe you wouldn't learn about it in as much detail. So basically it allows you to broaden your knowledge and maybe also make a decision about what field you want to specialise in after your foundation years as a Doctor.

The perks of doing an intercalation is that it adds points onto your FPAS application (when you are applying for your foundation years) and really builds up some key skills which are essential as a well rounded clinician i.e. keeping up to date with the ever changing field of Medicine!

I hope this helps, if you have any other questions please let me know!

Best Wishes,
Meenakshi
4th Year Medical Student
Official University Rep of St. George's University of London
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St George's University of London
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Just to add to what Meenakshi had to say, I'm also a St George's University of London medical student who intercalated in Global Health at St George's.

For us at St George's, you join the final year of the Biomedical Science degree for your intercalatd year. So you get awarded a whole degree, but only actually have to complete the final year of the degree! It's a brilliant opportunity.

For me, I chose to intercalate between years 3 and 4 of medical school.
I did 3 modules for my first semester (Monday am and pm, Tuesday am and pm and Friday pm) and 2 modules for my second semester (Monday and pm and Thursday am).

I chose to do extra modules (thus extra exams) instead of doing a dissertation.

I absolutely loved my modules, and the extra time that it gave me during the week also meant that I had more time to work on other aspects of myself. For example, I got a part-time job, I started running, I got more involved in societies and in research.

Hope that is useful! Let me know if I can answer any more questions.

Millie, 4th year medical student, official student rep of George's University of London
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