samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I'm in year 11 and I'm struggling in science quite a lot.
I need chemistry and biology for my A-levels so I need a 7 because I want to be a neurologist.
I haven't done science in yr7/8/9/10
I did EAL(English support as I was new to this country)in year 7.
I did sports leadership in year 8 so I missed most of my science lessons.
In year 9, unfortunately, our teacher left school so we had supplies and learnt nothing and in year 10 our former teacher had to go and help the year 11s so we were stuck with supplies again.
Now in year 11, we have a good teacher but I don't know anything about science as I'm doing triple aswell.
I was wondering if anyone could help me.
I've got CPG books for all sciences but I have to teach myself everything, I go on free science lessons and other youtube videos but they don't seem to help me as much as I dont know how to organise my learning.
I don't know where to start from as there's a lot.
I don't know how to teach myself all of this information in such a small time.
Please if you've got any solutions, share them with me.
0
reply
bambi1425
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
you can potentially get a tutor? and ask your teacher about extra help. Ire you doing aqa?
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by bambi1425)
you can potentially get a tutor? and ask your teacher about extra help. Ire you doing aqa?
yes, I'm doing AQA.
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by samela786)
yes, I'm doing AQA.
I already wasted money on some books and revision guides, I have to do all this by myself.
No tutors.
I asked my teachers for help, but they say start revising now and you will be fine.
The thing is I need to teach it to myself not to revise it.
0
reply
bambi1425
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
have a look at GCSE pod. youve had bit of a sucky deal with teachers if you need help with any topics you can pm me, I did the new spec of aqa triple
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
I tried GCSE pod, the thing is I dont know how to start or where to start.
0
reply
bambi1425
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by samela786)
I tried GCSE pod, the thing is I dont know how to start or where to start.
start from the very beginning of the course, or from a topic that sounds interesting to you
0
reply
Astaera
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
hey, If you have the textbooks, you need to use them, as the CGP is just a summary and will not tell you everything.

1) Read a chapter (beginning is a good idea), make sure u understand it completely - not memorised yet. If you don't, use kerboodle, seneca and youtube.

2) Make ur notes and start learning bits and pieces. I don't think you'll have too much time for in depth notes, but try to make flashcards/key words/equations.

3) Memorise the chapter. The textbook has questions after a double spread, and a double spread of questions after a topic, do these and familiarise urself with the question types. Some questions will never be asked in a paper.

4) Past papers - they show you how a paper works. DO THEM ALL. Practice is key. Sure, if you can remember the equations, well done, but you need to be able to recall and use the right one.

*I'm happy to help you with any more qs if you have any, but i can't teach you. I can go through everything at the end and make sure you haven't missed anything if you want
1
reply
Handel1742
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
Ok so with the sciences the best thing to do is DO PRACTICE QUESTIONS. Your in a good position that there has been 2 years worth of papers (plus two specimens).

The next thing to understand for GCSE is that having a deep understanding isn't really important as long as you can apply the content of the specification in different examples. So print out the specification(s) and just start learning. If you go to this link https://www.nusa.org.uk/data/uploads...tion_URLs.docx you will find links to past paper questions for every part of the course. These are very good for testing basic knowledge, so if you know theres something your struggling to understand: ask your teacher, watch free science lessons video, go to your textbook - just make sure you understand it.

After you understand everything go to the AQA website and do all the past papers that are on there - focus especially on the June 2018 and if your teachers let you (ask them they might give you them) the June 2019 papers.

Please message me if you need any more help (I've got all of the past papers and Mark Schemes going back to 2014) and all the best !
1
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Astaera)
hey, If you have the textbooks, you need to use them, as the CGP is just a summary and will not tell you everything.

1) Read a chapter (beginning is a good idea), make sure u understand it completely - not memorised yet. If you don't, use kerboodle, seneca and youtube.

2) Make ur notes and start learning bits and pieces. I don't think you'll have too much time for in depth notes, but try to make flashcards/key words/equations.

3) Memorise the chapter. The textbook has questions after a double spread, and a double spread of questions after a topic, do these and familiarise urself with the question types. Some questions will never be asked in a paper.

4) Past papers - they show you how a paper works. DO THEM ALL. Practice is key. Sure, if you can remember the equations, well done, but you need to be able to recall and use the right one.

*I'm happy to help you with any more qs if you have any, but i can't teach you. I can go through everything at the end and make sure you haven't missed anything if you want
Thank you so much, I really appreciate this advice and I hope it will work out well for me.
So are you saying CPG books don't have all the information I need?
Also, Shall I start from the first chapter and work my way up?
If yes, do you think my first step should be reading the chapter, take notes, watch a video and then apply what I learnt through practise questions/past papers?
Thanks again!
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Handel1742)
Ok so with the sciences the best thing to do is DO PRACTICE QUESTIONS. Your in a good position that there has been 2 years worth of papers (plus two specimens).

The next thing to understand for GCSE is that having a deep understanding isn't really important as long as you can apply the content of the specification in different examples. So print out the specification(s) and just start learning. If you go to this link https://www.nusa.org.uk/data/uploads...tion_URLs.docx you will find links to past paper questions for every part of the course. These are very good for testing basic knowledge, so if you know theres something your struggling to understand: ask your teacher, watch free science lessons video, go to your textbook - just make sure you understand it.

After you understand everything go to the AQA website and do all the past papers that are on there - focus especially on the June 2018 and if your teachers let you (ask them they might give you them) the June 2019 papers.

Please message me if you need any more help (I've got all of the past papers and Mark Schemes going back to 2014) and all the best !
Oh my god!
I just checked that link and it looks amazing, theres exam questions that will help me drastically.
Thank you so much you've been so helpful, I wasn't as confident when I did this thread because I thought people won't give me the advice I needed and the useful resources but really I've found a lot.
I don't know how to thank you.
I appreciate it.
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
If anyone has any online resources that would help me get to an A by the end of this year, I would really appreciate it.
I do GCSE AQA.
Thank you so much for your help!
0
reply
7kindsofbored
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
print out the specifications for your science subjects (you can find them on your exam boards website), they're a life saver honestly
0
reply
HGS345
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by samela786)
I'm in year 11 and I'm struggling in science quite a lot.
I need chemistry and biology for my A-levels so I need a 7 because I want to be a neurologist.
I haven't done science in yr7/8/9/10
I did EAL(English support as I was new to this country)in year 7.
I did sports leadership in year 8 so I missed most of my science lessons.
In year 9, unfortunately, our teacher left school so we had supplies and learnt nothing and in year 10 our former teacher had to go and help the year 11s so we were stuck with supplies again.
Now in year 11, we have a good teacher but I don't know anything about science as I'm doing triple aswell.
I was wondering if anyone could help me.
I've got CPG books for all sciences but I have to teach myself everything, I go on free science lessons and other youtube videos but they don't seem to help me as much as I dont know how to organise my learning.
I don't know where to start from as there's a lot.
I don't know how to teach myself all of this information in such a small time.
Please if you've got any solutions, share them with me.
Here is my study method that I used for A-Levels, works for GCSEs as well. Read through all of it, and it should help you organise your learning. Realistically, you could learn the triple sciences within 1 month. At GCSE it's very basic knowledge.

- Taught myself all the content as soon as I could. Started this approach in December, was done by 1st week of February.
- Type your notes up on Microsoft Word, ideally not a book as you'll want to edit it later (maybe use paper for Chemistry due to chemical equations, drawing out molecular structures etc.)

- Make sure your notes are simple, straight to the point, no BS, no extra detail, just make sure you understand the concept (I had about 20 pages of notes for each module, single sided paper). If your textbook has a crappy explanation, just watch a youtube video. Many 5 minute videos literally simplify 3-4 pages worth of information, sometimes even an entire topic

- Write your notes in your own words. If you can't write something up in your own words, you haven't understood it. Write it in a way that if a lay person were to read it, they would understand, that's how simplified it should be. This will help you whiz through your notes when revising. To put it into perspective, by the 3rd time round I went through A-Level Biology and Chemistry notes, I could go through half a years worth of notes in 3-4 hours. 1 month before my exam, I could get through all of A2 Chem/Bio in 2 hours
- Also, remember, a picture can explain a thousand words, so diagrams are very helpful

- After you've covered everything, go through the specification to see if you've missed anything out.

- Then start practice questions alongside revision. Ideally you want to go through your notes at least once a week from February till May/Exam time, that way you'll have gone over it enough times that, regardless of how bad you are at memorising, it will no doubt stick in your head.

- Self-mark papers (English, History etc. are quite difficult to self-mark, ideally get your teacher to do it. But Maths, Science, R.E. etc. are easy to self mark). Make sure you know exactly where you went wrong, and why you got it right (as you may have fluked the answer)
- Get comfortable answering practice questions on each topic before you attempt past papers

Let me know if you have any questions.
1
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by HGS345)
Here is my study method that I used for A-Levels, works for GCSEs as well. Read through all of it, and it should help you organise your learning. Realistically, you could learn the triple sciences within 1 month. At GCSE it's very basic knowledge.

- Taught myself all the content as soon as I could. Started this approach in December, was done by 1st week of February.
- Type your notes up on Microsoft Word, ideally not a book as you'll want to edit it later (maybe use paper for Chemistry due to chemical equations, drawing out molecular structures etc.)

- Make sure your notes are simple, straight to the point, no BS, no extra detail, just make sure you understand the concept (I had about 20 pages of notes for each module, single sided paper). If your textbook has a crappy explanation, just watch a youtube video. Many 5 minute videos literally simplify 3-4 pages worth of information, sometimes even an entire topic

- Write your notes in your own words. If you can't write something up in your own words, you haven't understood it. Write it in a way that if a lay person were to read it, they would understand, that's how simplified it should be. This will help you whiz through your notes when revising. To put it into perspective, by the 3rd time round I went through A-Level Biology and Chemistry notes, I could go through half a years worth of notes in 3-4 hours. 1 month before my exam, I could get through all of A2 Chem/Bio in 2 hours
- Also, remember, a picture can explain a thousand words, so diagrams are very helpful

- After you've covered everything, go through the specification to see if you've missed anything out.

- Then start practice questions alongside revision. Ideally you want to go through your notes at least once a week from February till May/Exam time, that way you'll have gone over it enough times that, regardless of how bad you are at memorising, it will no doubt stick in your head.

- Self-mark papers (English, History etc. are quite difficult to self-mark, ideally get your teacher to do it. But Maths, Science, R.E. etc. are easy to self mark). Make sure you know exactly where you went wrong, and why you got it right (as you may have fluked the answer)
- Get comfortable answering practice questions on each topic before you attempt past papers

Let me know if you have any questions.
You basically answered my questions.
Thank you so much!
Means a lot that there's still people here to help.
Thanks again!
If you got any useful resources online that could help me, it would be great.Doesn't matter if not.
Thanks again!
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by L I G H T)
print out the specifications for your science subjects (you can find them on your exam boards website), they're a life saver honestly
And how do I use them?
Do I just see what I've gone through and what I've missed or revise from it aswell?
0
reply
HGS345
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by samela786)
You basically answered my questions.
Thank you so much!
Means a lot that there's still people here to help.
Thanks again!
If you got any useful resources online that could help me, it would be great.Doesn't matter if not.
Thanks again!
I haven't got any resource in particular that may help you, but I would make notes on every topic using both the standard school textbook and the CGP book (each book explains certain topics better than the other), and anything I really didn't understand, I would use youtube. Especially videos where it's drawn out as I'm more of a visual learner.

For biology and chemistry, I would recommend AK lectures --> https://www.youtube.com/user/mathdude2012
I'm not sure if he does physics videos as the books were enough for me, but he does have a honours degree in Maths so I'm pretty sure he does. I know he's posted degree level Physics videos. This guy is a blessing for students. He explains things in very lay terms and draws out everything.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCj3...35g3peVWnVLoew --> This guy is very good for Chemistry, also uses actual models in his videos to get the message across
0
reply
samela786
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by HGS345)
I haven't got any resource in particular that may help you, but I would make notes on every topic using both the standard school textbook and the CGP book (each book explains certain topics better than the other), and anything I really didn't understand, I would use youtube. Especially videos where it's drawn out as I'm more of a visual learner.

For biology and chemistry, I would recommend AK lectures --> https://www.youtube.com/user/mathdude2012
I'm not sure if he does physics videos as the books were enough for me, but he does have a honours degree in Maths so I'm pretty sure he does. I know he's posted degree level Physics videos. This guy is a blessing for students. He explains things in very lay terms and draws out everything.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCj3...35g3peVWnVLoew --> This guy is very good for Chemistry, also uses actual models in his videos to get the message across
Thank you so much!
You've honestly helped me so much.
I am so thankful for everything, all this advice has been so useful and I will make sure I put it into work.
Thanks a lot!!
1
reply
7kindsofbored
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by samela786)
And how do I use them?
Do I just see what I've gone through and what I've missed or revise from it aswell?
the specifications link with the textbook and id you know everything on the specification you're good to go for the exam. I'd also recommend doing a ton of past papers and exam-style questions. Have a look through the mark scheme after and really familiarize yourself with key terms that'll get you the marks
0
reply
Aurorae
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
Let me tell you, I was in EXACTLY the same situations. I had substitutes until Year 11 and failed nearly every Science mock with the highest grade being a 5, but in the real thing I came out with 7-7 (Combined), I did it by watching videos by Science and Maths by Primrose Kitten and using Seneca Learning!! Make notes and review them before the exams. You’ve got LOADS of time, you’ll do great.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (3)
25%
I'm not sure (0)
0%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (4)
33.33%
I have already dropped out (0)
0%
I'm not a current university student (5)
41.67%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed