Cakelover666
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should I do one?
I know I want to go into medicine and my school says I should but I am doing 4 a levels so would it be too much work load or manageable. if you did one how was it? did it add significantly to your workload or not?
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Sanaa01
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I did one and it was very interesting for me but at times it can be a lot of work especially when deadlines come and that’s usually when we had mocks for our other subjects. But I really liked it and was very pleased with my grade. It’s your choice tho. Do you think you can handle it?
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DGeorge13
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
should I do one?
I know I want to go into medicine and my school says I should but I am doing 4 a levels so would it be too much work load or manageable. if you did one how was it? did it add significantly to your workload or not?
I would say it is a lot of work and I have way too much but mine is quite extreme. Do it for the transferable skills it gives you that you could reflect upon at interview or personal statement not the abilities to get a lower offer at some unis. With three a levels I find it quite a stretch still so it’s kind of dependent on how you manage your time.
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by DGeorge13)
I would say it is a lot of work and I have way too much but mine is quite extreme. Do it for the transferable skills it gives you that you could reflect upon at interview or personal statement not the abilities to get a lower offer at some unis. With three a levels I find it quite a stretch still so it’s kind of dependent on how you manage your time.
what topic are you doing if I may ask. also are you doing it in 1 yr or 2 because my school offers it for both and I thought it would be good to have finished it in yr 12
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by Sanaa01)
I did one and it was very interesting for me but at times it can be a lot of work especially when deadlines come and that’s usually when we had mocks for our other subjects. But I really liked it and was very pleased with my grade. It’s your choice tho. Do you think you can handle it?
I am not sure if I can handle it I am doing maths further math bio and chem and thoses are pretty heavy a levels. and I dont want the epq to effect my grades in those. did you find a epq took time away from your alevel studies?
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bioelle
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I got an A* in my EPQ and as much as I enjoyed it, it was a LOT of work, including all the reading and then writing it up etc. I'd say you're doing enough and quite frankly unis would rather you had good grades in your A Levels than have an EPQ and average grades, especially as Medicine is so competitive.
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by bioelle)
I got an A* in my EPQ and as much as I enjoyed it, it was a LOT of work, including all the reading and then writing it up etc. I'd say you're doing enough and quite frankly unis would rather you had good grades in your A Levels than have an EPQ and average grades, especially as Medicine is so competitive.
your absolutely right, I rather focus on quality not quantity.
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
I am not sure if I can handle it I am doing maths further math bio and chem and thoses are pretty heavy a levels. and I dont want the epq to effect my grades in those. did you find a epq took time away from your alevel studies?
I got an A in EPQ after writing it over 3 all-nighters (total wordcount was around 5000 words) in 2013. I only spent two weeks planning its structure and content, while reading through all the journals and resources I needed to support my arguments about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. Although I really enjoyed it and it opened my eyes to how important academic research is, for medicine, the majority of medical schools do not take it into account when making an offer. Therefore, I would not recommend taking it unless you need it, or are really interested in a medical topic and want to expand your knowledge and understanding. One exception nowadays to this rule is Manchester, but that is only when they make a holistic assessment of your application; you have to meet specific criteria to be eligible for this.
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
I got an A in EPQ after writing it over 3 all-nighters (total wordcount was around 5000 words) in 2013. I only spent two weeks planning its structure and content, while reading through all the journals and resources I needed to support my arguments about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. Although I really enjoyed it and it opened my eyes to how important academic research is, for medicine, the majority of medical schools do not take it into account when making an offer. Therefore, I would not recommend taking it unless you need it, or are really interested in a medical topic and want to expand your knowledge and understanding. One exception nowadays to this rule is Manchester, but that is only when they make a holistic assessment of your application; you have to meet specific criteria to be eligible for this.
thanks you this was very useful. do you think it will give an edge to my university application if I apply to cambridge?
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
thanks you this was very useful. do you think it will give an edge to my university application if I apply to cambridge?
I think Cambridge normally prefer students to take biology, chemistry, and physics, with maths at AS or another subject, rather than maths and further maths; 90%< of students that get an offer took at least three sciences/ two sciences and a mathematics subject, which is fairly similar to Oxford as well. Your subject combination is suitable for a Cambridge application though, as long as you meet the minimum requirements (A*A*A).

I think taking an EPQ could help you stand out more, however, assuming you are planning to take all 4 A-Levels at A2. This would also stand you in good stead at Manchester, as they like students that take 4 A-levels and EPQ as well. But most likely, Cambridge would only make you an offer based on your main 3 A-Levels (whichever those might be).
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
I think Cambridge normally prefer students to take biology, chemistry, and physics, with maths at AS or another subject, rather than maths and further maths; 90%< of students that get an offer took at least three sciences/ two sciences and a mathematics subject, which is fairly similar to Oxford as well. Your subject combination is suitable for a Cambridge application though, as long as you meet the minimum requirements (A*A*A).

I think taking an EPQ could help you stand out more, however, assuming you are planning to take all 4 A-Levels at A2. This would also stand you in good stead at Manchester, as they like students that take 4 A-levels and EPQ as well. But most likely, Cambridge would only make you an offer based on your main 3 A-Levels (whichever those might be).
ok since I'm not thinking manchester I guess epq is not necessary. do you know about what imperial prefer?
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peeked
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
I think Cambridge normally prefer students to take biology, chemistry, and physics, with maths at AS or another subject, rather than maths and further maths; 90%< of students that get an offer took at least three sciences/ two sciences and a mathematics subject, which is fairly similar to Oxford as well. Your subject combination is suitable for a Cambridge application though, as long as you meet the minimum requirements (A*A*A).

I think taking an EPQ could help you stand out more, however, assuming you are planning to take all 4 A-Levels at A2. This would also stand you in good stead at Manchester, as they like students that take 4 A-levels and EPQ as well. But most likely, Cambridge would only make you an offer based on your main 3 A-Levels (whichever those might be).
Is it really advantageous to do 4 A levels to A2 for medicine? Because I do maths physics chemistry and biology and I've done an AS in physics (in which I got an A in) and now am considering dropping physics so i can concentrate on bio chem maths
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by peeked)
Is it really advantageous to do 4 A levels to A2 for medicine? Because I do maths physics chemistry and biology and I've done an AS in physics (in which I got an A in) and now am considering dropping physics so i can concentrate on bio chem maths
I get what you mean but I am not necessarily taking 4 a levels for the sake a advantage in medicine. I really love maths ( not as a career tho) and I have a natural flair for it. so taking furthermaths is for my own happiness not medicine university requirement or fitting a criteria. i also really like biology so i am taking that and I'm taking chemistry simply because i want to go into medicine. and I cant really drop any of bio or chem at AS as that's bad for application but I really love maths. and I passionately hate physics
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by peeked)
Is it really advantageous to do 4 A levels to A2 for medicine? Because I do maths physics chemistry and biology and I've done an AS in physics (in which I got an A in) and now am considering dropping physics so i can concentrate on bio chem maths
No, it's not really that advantageous in general, because most medical schools only look at the predictions for 3 A-Levels, plus your entrance exam (BMAT for Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, UCL etc; UCAT for the majority of other medical schools), GCSEs and any contextual/ widening participation criteria. The personal statement for most medical schools is not as important as it used to be. I would recommend dropping physics unless you have a passion for it and can do better in it than another subject, in which case you should drop something else.
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peeked
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
No, it's not really that advantageous in general, because most medical schools only look at the predictions for 3 A-Levels, plus your entrance exam (BMAT for Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, UCL etc; UCAT for the majority of other medical schools), GCSEs and any contextual/ widening participation criteria. The personal statement for most medical schools is not as important as it used to be. I would recommend dropping physics unless you have a passion for it and can do better in it than another subject, in which case you should drop something else.
Okay thank you, this was very helpful advice!
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replyplzbish
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
should I do one?
I know I want to go into medicine and my school says I should but I am doing 4 a levels so would it be too much work load or manageable. if you did one how was it? did it add significantly to your workload or not?
Don't think they'll care about EPQ. Why are you doing further maths if you know you want to do medicine? not much point
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Cakelover666
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(Original post by replyplzbish)
Don't think they'll care about EPQ. Why are you doing further maths if you know you want to do medicine? not much point
my school is telling me its beneficial to take an epq and unis like that. but most people I have talked to who have done an epq say different. I'm taking furthermaths because I really like maths and believe it or not it's kind of a break for me from bio and chem
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replyplzbish
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
my school is telling me its beneficial to take an epq and unis like that. but most people I have talked to who have done an epq say different. I'm taking furthermaths because I really like maths and believe it or not it's kind of a break for me from bio and chem
fair enough. I would say the EPQ is more important than a 4th A level if you want to do medicine. If you are 100% sure you want to medicine I would really say don't bother with FM as it's way more important you get AAA or above rather than spreading yourself too thin. Further maths is good though if you might go into something else like maths or economics.
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
my school is telling me its beneficial to take an epq and unis like that. but most people I have talked to who have done an epq say different. I'm taking furthermaths because I really like maths and believe it or not it's kind of a break for me from bio and chem
Never just listen to what your school says; do your own research. There are so many students whose prospects of entering a medical degree were ruined from the getgo because of teachers talking about admissions criteria they, in reality, know very little about. You 100% do not need to take EPQ to study medicine; it will be very unlikely (less than 5% chance) that it will influence any offers you would get from medical schools. All medical schools have set criteria to fulfill: for example, UCAT-heavy universities set cut-offs (e.g usually only top 30% get an interview at KCL and Manchester), GCSE-heavy universities require several A*/ 8s and 9s (this applies to KCL, as well as Cardiff), and most universities require a mixture of different emphasies which you need to find out about, and then tailor your application to, once you know.

The vast majority of medical schools nowadays want students to have good GCSE passes in a range of subjects, high A-Level predictions in 3 subjects; two science and one other subject (at least AAA or A*AA) and a good entrance score examination, alongside a decent personal statement. EPQ is just an addition to that, which can be evidence of your academic ability since it is a stand-alone qualification. As long as you can meet the minimum entry requirements, that is all that matters. For elite universities like Oxbridge, 4 A-Levels can make you stand out because it is not uncommon for students to take 4 A-levels for that reason. But is it not necessary; A*A*A* is better than A*ABB and the former would meet the minimum requirements of all medical schools in the U.K., whereas the latter does not, since many medical schools do not equate A*AB with AAA.
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DGeorge13
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(Original post by Cakelover666)
what topic are you doing if I may ask. also are you doing it in 1 yr or 2 because my school offers it for both and I thought it would be good to have finished it in yr 12
I’m doing to what extent increased obesity prevention campaigns have resulted in higher levels of anorexia. I would do it in year 12 if given the option as I wasn’t and that’s what I would have done
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