Studying medicine then law conversion - can you get a top job?

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Rishi.R
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Hey everyone,

So I have heard that there is an oversaturation of law student meaning it is incredibly hard to even get a mid-range job because there are just SO MANY law graduates. Atm, I am still trying to decide between Law and Medicine as I have a passion for both those careers. However, I was wondering: If I studied medicine and then did a law conversion course, would I still be able to get a top job (e.g. Magic Circle, Silver Circle and other top firms) or would I be at a disadvantage. I guess what I am trying to ask here is that will I still stand the same chance as any other top law graduate provided I get the grades and good, relevant extra-curricular.

Thanks!
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
Hey everyone,

So I have heard that there is an oversaturation of law student meaning it is incredibly hard to even get a mid-range job because there are just SO MANY law graduates. Atm, I am still trying to decide between Law and Medicine as I have a passion for both those careers. However, I was wondering: If I studied medicine and then did a law conversion course, would I still be able to get a top job (e.g. Magic Circle, Silver Circle and other top firms) or would I be at a disadvantage. I guess what I am trying to ask here is that will I still stand the same chance as any other top law graduate provided I get the grades and good, relevant extra-curricular.

Thanks!
If those are your only career options, then you have not done enough research. Medicine is not just a course you study to make you more employable and allow you to transfer to another career; it is designed to be a vocation, much like law, and is intended to allow someone to enter for generally a lifetime within their respective field. To be frank, there are more career options than just law and medicine. If you cannot see yourself committing solidly to either one after obtaining relevant work experience in either (instead of just reading about them), you should expand your horizons and explore other career paths. Both careers take serious commitment and dedication in their own right, which I do not think you realise.
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Rishi.R
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
If those are your only career options, then you have not done enough research. Medicine is not just a course you study to make you more employable and allow you to transfer to another career; it is designed to be a vocation, much like law, and is intended to allow someone to enter for generally a lifetime within their respective field. To be frank, there are more career options than just law and medicine. If you cannot see yourself committing solidly to either one after obtaining relevant work experience in either (instead of just reading about them), you should expand your horizons and explore other career paths. Both careers take serious commitment and dedication in their own right, which I do not think you realise.
I am not using medicine as a safe option. I like both careers and would happily pursue both of them. I have done research into other career paths but none of them really appeal to me apart from these two, I couldn't really see myself doing anything else apart from Law and Medicine. I am just playing at the scenario that I might have a small possibility of regretting doing medicine over law as all. I am 100% aware of the serious commitment to BOTH of these subjects as my whole family are doctors and lawyers and I have plenty of insight into both careers and what it takes to do them.
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
I am not using medicine as a safe option. I like both careers and would happily pursue both of them. I have done research into other career paths but none of them really appeal to me apart from these two, I couldn't really see myself doing anything else apart from Law and Medicine. I am just playing at the scenario that I might have a small possibility of regretting doing medicine over law as all. I am 100% aware of the serious commitment to BOTH of these subjects as my whole family are doctors and lawyers and I have plenty of insight into both careers and what it takes to do them.
Fair enough, as long as you understand the gravity of work and dedication both careers would require, and that any expectation from your family to be a doctor or lawyer is not a good reason to become either of those things.

Out of that small chance, it is possible, because there are medical students that have pursued this route. It's hard to say whether or not you would be disadvantaged; you should at least be equal to the next candidate. However, there is not much information available about this career conversion. It is good you cannot see yourself doing anything else than those two careers if you have done enough research though, because you would likely enjoy them for that reason.
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Rishi.R
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(Original post by davidthomasjnr)
Fair enough, as long as you understand the gravity of work and dedication both careers would require, and that any expectation from your family to be a doctor or lawyer is not a good reason to become either of those things.

Out of that small chance, it is possible, because there are medical students that have pursued this route. It's hard to say whether or not you would be disadvantaged; you should at least be equal to the next candidate. However, there is not much information available about this career conversion. It is good you cannot see yourself doing anything else than those two careers if you have done enough research though, because you would likely enjoy them for that reason.
I can assure that this is not because of family expectations although I do see why you would think that XD. You're right when you say that there is not much information on this route to law as I've been trying to get some kind of an answer for a while now. What I found out was that lot's of people who did a conversion course previously did a degree in a language or some sort of humanities subject and have a good law job. However, I do not fancy doing some other degree for the sake of a conversion course.

Thanks for your help anyway, I appreciate it!
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thepaperhero
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The conversion course (GDL) is being replaced by the SQE, so you would have to do that instead. You would not be at a disadvantage, most firms recruit 50/50 or 60/40 split of law/non law students and a lot of firms want to recruit more STEM students. You will just need clear reasons for wanting to go into commercial law which can be backed up by relevant work experience.
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J Papi
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Stupid idea
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Rishi.R
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Stupid idea
Elaborate?
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Realisticism
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Law firms will probably wonder what the heck you're doing. Like one of the posters above said, medicine is a vocational degree. People don't study medicine just because they have nothing better to do with their time. If you apply to law firms with an MBBS (or the equivalent), the question that law firms will instinctively ask is: why are you now pursuing a career in law as opposed to a career in medicine? The practice of law is radically different from the practice of medicine. Unless you have an extremely persuasive reason for switching, your application is not going to make the cut.

I do wonder if, instead, where your 'passion' truly lies is in the perceived prestige of the two professions.
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Stefanidi
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
Elaborate?
Why would you do a 5 year course in medicine, which is the most vocational course offered at uni, to then become a lawyer?...
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username4889668
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I don’t think I’ve ever heard of someone doing this ngl

harrysbar?
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Rai258
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Just posting so I can be notified to view replies
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Stefanidi
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https://www.law.ac.uk/postgraduate/sqe/
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J Papi
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
Elaborate?
You're wasting 5 years of your life studying for a degree that's very, very different to anything related to law or the legal career...

...only to be on an equal footing to every other non-law graduate when you do eventually do the GDL or SQE.

You can do it, and it won't formally disadvantage you (other than suggesting that you're not too sure about going into a legal career?), but it's a waste of time.
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Rishi.R
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(Original post by Realisticism)
Law firms will probably wonder what the heck you're doing. Like one of the posters above said, medicine is a vocational degree. People don't study medicine just because they have nothing better to do with their time. If you apply to law firms with an MBBS (or the equivalent), the question that law firms will instinctively ask is: why are you now pursuing a career in law as opposed to a career in medicine? The practice of law is radically different from the practice of medicine. Unless you have an extremely persuasive reason for switching, your application is not going to make the cut.

I do wonder if, instead, where your 'passion' truly lies is in the perceived prestige of the two professions.
I would be lying if I said the prestige is nice but that is merely a coincidence, I genuinely do enjoy these professions after doing work experience in both. I just don't want any regrets at the end of the day hence why my question seems to only convey the pragmatic side of my thinking.
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Rishi.R
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(Original post by Stefanidi)
Why would you do a 5 year course in medicine, which is the most vocational course offered at uni, to then become a lawyer?...
I'm not doing it for the sake of being a lawyer. Just wondering if it's possible, that is all.
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mishieru07
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
I'm not doing it for the sake of being a lawyer. Just wondering if it's possible, that is all.
Theoretically it's possible. In fact, having a STEM degree would probably be helpful if you want to enter an area like intellectual property.

That said, I'm struggling to think of anyone who has made that switch. First, they are vastly different careers with different skill sets and interests. If I were a recruiter, I would question why you want to switch from medicine to law considering they are so different (business, banking or consultancy to law is arguably an easier sell because there's more overlap, especially if you want to do corporate or finance at a MC/SC/US firm).

Second, medical education and training takes a long time and is notoriously hard - I honestly wouldn't recommend choosing medicine unless you actually want it as a vocation. A medical degree takes 5 years, add 2 years of foundation training before you become a fully qualified doctor, and then another 3-5+ years to become a specialist. That's a colossal amount of time and effort, and if you decided to switch to law, you're looking at maybe ~1 year for SQE and 2 years work experience/ training before you qualify as a solicitor. And that's assuming you get an offer right out of the gate - it is not uncommon for applicants to gain experience as a paralegal first before applying, or to apply over a few cycles
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161BMW
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
I'm not doing it for the sake of being a lawyer. Just wondering if it's possible, that is all.
I think it is possible but you be one of the minority.

If you look at medicine graduates only a very small number graduate then do not enter medicine and go into investment banking, law or other professions. Yeah could be argued is a waste of 5 years esp when medicine is so competitive to get a place.

Then again there are lots of people who do degrees then do a job totally unrelated to their degree which begs the question surely it was a waste of time doing their degree. For example, history, art, physics to an extent as most go into finance etc.

Fwiw I know someone who went Imperial Medicine graduated did couple of years then left and became personal trainer as he hated medicine. His dad is a surgeon and the guy said only go into medicine if you really love it and the hours are long think he means hospital work. GP is maybe more cushy.
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161BMW
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(Original post by Rishi.R)
I would be lying if I said the prestige is nice but that is merely a coincidence, I genuinely do enjoy these professions after doing work experience in both. I just don't want any regrets at the end of the day hence why my question seems to only convey the pragmatic side of my thinking.
You could perhaps specialise in medical areas of law if such a thing exists just an idea.
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