x_adz17_x
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I just started year 12 and i'm doing the ib. I really want to get over 40 points so I'm trying to start revising now in september but i don't know how to revise for ib properly. Is there anyone who has any revision tips for me ?
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AurelijaB
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I did the IB a few years ago, so I'm praying the following is still relevant for you! The syllabus is really helpful to have for each of your subjects, as it lays out exactly what is expected of you. I used to make revision check-lists based on the information in them. I studied HL Chemistry and found YouTube videos extremely helpful - there are some teachers who make videos specifically for IB revision. Generally the textbooks are alright but they're not always tailored to the IB.
The main thing really is start early (which you're already doing), do little bits but often. Maybe detailed notes or flashcards for your subjects at the end of the week? Pace it, spread it out over the year to make life easier. With so many subjects (and the EE), you definitely want to get the revision material prep done before exam season hits.

Hope this helps!
Aurelija
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leadey
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I graduated from IB this year with 38 points and my biggest tip is if you are in a time crunch - don’t touch the textbooks!! Right now you have a lot of time and you could read them but I personally didn’t really open them except for economics and chemistry’s option. If you are doing biology, Bioninja is all you need even for HL. I got a 6 in HL and I felt adequate only with bioninja knowledge, for 7 you might need to read the textbooks. I also did HL chemistry and SL math (both 6) and the textbook for chemistry is fun to read but there is no way I was going to get through it and remember a single thing so I just did many past papers and I mean a lot of past papers (probably all until 2000). I didn’t find any useful resources so I just practiced, observed the most common questions (they reuse a huge percentage) and made sure to learn them perfectly to leave time for those that are new in the exam. Past papers are your best friend for math and chemistry. And make sure you know *every* advantage your calculator could give on paper 2, it is much harder than it initially seems but know your calculator very well.

If you need any subject specific tips or anything, let me know, I’ll gladly help
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x_adz17_x
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(Original post by AurelijaB)
I did the IB a few years ago, so I'm praying the following is still relevant for you! The syllabus is really helpful to have for each of your subjects, as it lays out exactly what is expected of you. I used to make revision check-lists based on the information in them. I studied HL Chemistry and found YouTube videos extremely helpful - there are some teachers who make videos specifically for IB revision. Generally the textbooks are alright but they're not always tailored to the IB.
The main thing really is start early (which you're already doing), do little bits but often. Maybe detailed notes or flashcards for your subjects at the end of the week? Pace it, spread it out over the year to make life easier. With so many subjects (and the EE), you definitely want to get the revision material prep done before exam season hits.

Hope this helps!
Aurelija
Thank you so much for the tips! I'm definitely making sure I start early so I don't have a huge amount of work to do later.
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x_adz17_x
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(Original post by leadey)
I graduated from IB this year with 38 points and my biggest tip is if you are in a time crunch - don’t touch the textbooks!! Right now you have a lot of time and you could read them but I personally didn’t really open them except for economics and chemistry’s option. If you are doing biology, Bioninja is all you need even for HL. I got a 6 in HL and I felt adequate only with bioninja knowledge, for 7 you might need to read the textbooks. I also did HL chemistry and SL math (both 6) and the textbook for chemistry is fun to read but there is no way I was going to get through it and remember a single thing so I just did many past papers and I mean a lot of past papers (probably all until 2000). I didn’t find any useful resources so I just practiced, observed the most common questions (they reuse a huge percentage) and made sure to learn them perfectly to leave time for those that are new in the exam. Past papers are your best friend for math and chemistry. And make sure you know *every* advantage your calculator could give on paper 2, it is much harder than it initially seems but know your calculator very well.

If you need any subject specific tips or anything, let me know, I’ll gladly help
Thanks so much for the tips. I'm going to wait until a little bit later in the year before I start practising with past papers but do you know where I can find past papers like is there a particular website for them?
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