hana hirau
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I'm considering applying for either straight psychology or psychology and language science. my first choice would probably be ucl, and I'm thinking of even applying for both degrees at ucl with psych as 1st and psych+language sciences as 2nd (since the grade requirements are lower for the latter). But this depends on what I'll actually prefer, which I don't know.

I've heard a lot about how much maths/statistics there is in a psychology degree, but I can't find much information regarding this for psychology and language sciences. Is there just as much maths/statistics for it? For the preferred A Level subjects they didn't mention maths whereas straight psych does, which makes me think there isn't as much.
To be honest I don't like maths at all (I got a 7 in gcse and swore I'll never do it again), but I really do like psychology and could probably survive the stats element... I would just prefer not to do a lot.

I do English lit, art, and psychology A level (and did Japanese this year), so not really much maths at all (most we've done in psych is like mean, median, mode). I just don't know... pure psych or psych and lang science??

and what is psychology/psych and lang sciences actually like... just need more info :^))
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Nerol
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(Original post by hana hirau)
I'm considering applying for either straight psychology or psychology and language science. my first choice would probably be ucl, and I'm thinking of even applying for both degrees at ucl with psych as 1st and psych+language sciences as 2nd (since the grade requirements are lower for the latter). But this depends on what I'll actually prefer, which I don't know.

I've heard a lot about how much maths/statistics there is in a psychology degree, but I can't find much information regarding this for psychology and language sciences. Is there just as much maths/statistics for it? For the preferred A Level subjects they didn't mention maths whereas straight psych does, which makes me think there isn't as much.
To be honest I don't like maths at all (I got a 7 in gcse and swore I'll never do it again), but I really do like psychology and could probably survive the stats element... I would just prefer not to do a lot.

I do English lit, art, and psychology A level (and did Japanese this year), so not really much maths at all (most we've done in psych is like mean, median, mode). I just don't know... pure psych or psych and lang science??

and what is psychology/psych and lang sciences actually like... just need more info :^))
Hi!

I recently completed a BSc in Psychology & Counselling and, like you, was dreading the maths before I started.

While there is a lot of statistical analysis involved, it doesn't actually involve figuring this all out yourself. There are software packages that do it all for you. The things you need to do yourself are figure out which type of analysis to run (there is a lot of guidance on this) and then understand the numbers that are churned out. Honestly, it wasn't as horrible as I'd expected! For my research project, though, I used a qualitative design, which involved zero math.

Go with whichever course you prefer and don't let the idea of maths put you off - it's really not that bad!

Loren
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Alice_posa
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I agree with Loren, just completed my Bsc degree in psych as well and similarly I also used a qualitative design with a minimum stats , only percentages and descriptive stats for my dissertation and finished with a first overall, despite the fact I hate maths and stats.

It's not as complicated as it seems, you just have to know what button to press on the software. It can be difficult to understand but you will be fine really, if you can get 7 in gsce.

By the way, my friend did psych and language and It's basically the same research methods but she had different modules for language.
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hana hirau
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Thanks for the replies, I've decided to apply for psychology and fingers crossed it'll be fine :^)))

(Original post by Alice_posa)
I agree with Loren, just completed my Bsc degree in psych as well and similarly I also used a qualitative design with a minimum stats , only percentages and descriptive stats for my dissertation and finished with a first overall, despite the fact I hate maths and stats.

It's not as complicated as it seems, you just have to know what button to press on the software. It can be difficult to understand but you will be fine really, if you can get 7 in gsce.

By the way, my friend did psych and language and It's basically the same research methods but she had different modules for language.
(Original post by Nerol)
Hi!

I recently completed a BSc in Psychology & Counselling and, like you, was dreading the maths before I started.

While there is a lot of statistical analysis involved, it doesn't actually involve figuring this all out yourself. There are software packages that do it all for you. The things you need to do yourself are figure out which type of analysis to run (there is a lot of guidance on this) and then understand the numbers that are churned out. Honestly, it wasn't as horrible as I'd expected! For my research project, though, I used a qualitative design, which involved zero math.

Go with whichever course you prefer and don't let the idea of maths put you off - it's really not that bad!

Loren
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bones-mccoy
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You'll probably end up doing a research methods/stats module every year and then will have to use stats in your dissertation, especially if it's quantitative. A lot of people studying psychology dread the stats side but remember everyone is in the same boat, the tutors teach everything from the very basic level in first year and it'll progressively get harder as the years go on.
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harrysbar
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My daughter was also dreading the stats in her Psychology degree - it is her weak point and she needed a tutor to help her pass her maths GCSE and get a grade B. However, she coped with the stats on the degree course just fine and graduated with a 2.1
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