DD_vendz
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Guys i dont know whether to do civil engineering or economics, i have a good connextion wiht both subjects, i am interested in buildings road, damns and all that, but sometimes economics also interests me. I would have done civil engineering, but i heard its a lot of hands on work is that true and there is gender inequality. Economics is interesting too. Can anyone tell me what u do in the different degrees? Job oppurtunities?
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DD_vendz
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plz guys help
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DD_vendz
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Noone?
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Smack
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(Original post by DD_vendz)
Guys i dont know whether to do civil engineering or economics, i have a good connextion wiht both subjects, i am interested in buildings road, damns and all that, but sometimes economics also interests me. I would have done civil engineering, but i heard its a lot of hands on work is that true and there is gender inequality. Economics is interesting too. Can anyone tell me what u do in the different degrees? Job oppurtunities?
Probably little if any hands on work in a civil engineering degree (it's not a construction apprenticeship, i.e. you're not laying bricks or operating diggers). As with most engineering professions, there's more men than women in it, but civil & structural probably has the most even gender balance out of all the mainstream engineering disciplines.
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Anagogic
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If you're interested in both best to do an undergrad in CE then take it form there.

Can easily switch to Economics but not so with civil, something to consider.
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msbx
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Im starting civi engineering this month at uni and after going to lots of carrers talks and fairs lots of employers say you can go into fields such as finance and investment banking with any engineering degree. So job wise, Civil engineering would be pretty versatile.

Not too sure on the actual course though
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by DD_vendz)
Guys i dont know whether to do civil engineering or economics, i have a good connextion wiht both subjects, i am interested in buildings road, damns and all that, but sometimes economics also interests me. I would have done civil engineering, but i heard its a lot of hands on work is that true and there is gender inequality. Economics is interesting too. Can anyone tell me what u do in the different degrees? Job oppurtunities?
I think you should choose Economics
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Anagogic
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(Original post by Smack)
Probably little if any hands on work in a civil engineering degree (it's not a construction apprenticeship, i.e. you're not laying bricks or operating diggers). As with most engineering professions, there's more men than women in it, but civil & structural probably has the most even gender balance out of all the mainstream engineering disciplines.
Would disagree, civil is set in its ways as the oldest engineering profession there are very few females in the industry.
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DD_vendz
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(Original post by Anagogic)
Would disagree, civil is set in its ways as the oldest engineering profession there are very few females in the industry.
So is it likely that it wont be suitable for me?. I know a lotta ppl that wanna study economics and therefore i am also interested in economics as their is a range of ppl. What are the job prospects of studing engineering
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DD_vendz
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(Original post by msbx)
Im starting civi engineering this month at uni and after going to lots of carrers talks and fairs lots of employers say you can go into fields such as finance and investment banking with any engineering degree. So job wise, Civil engineering would be pretty versatile.

Not too sure on the actual course though
Does civil engineering include a lot of hands on works as im not into that. I also dont want to end up in a career where i just sit in an office i want to work in an office but also do meetings and all that does civil engineering inclide this
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DD_vendz
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(Original post by Smack)
Probably little if any hands on work in a civil engineering degree (it's not a construction apprenticeship, i.e. you're not laying bricks or operating diggers). As with most engineering professions, there's more men than women in it, but civil & structural probably has the most even gender balance out of all the mainstream engineering disciplines.
Is that true? I have heard a lot of ppl saying its very practical. Also may i ask did u stydy civil engineering?
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DD_vendz
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I would also like to ask does it matter what uni u graduate from whether u do civil engineering or economics. Are the job prospects different at different lrvels of uni?
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Smack
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(Original post by Anagogic)
Would disagree, civil is set in its ways as the oldest engineering profession there are very few females in the industry.
I've seen some statistics that suggest that civil & structural engineering has a more equal gender ratio than most other disciplines. Although it's still heavily skewed. I think, out of the main disciplines, chemical has the most equal ratio.

(Original post by DD_vendz)
Is that true? I have heard a lot of ppl saying its very practical. Also may i ask did u stydy civil engineering?
Practical in what way? As I said, it's an engineering degree, not an apprenticeship, so there'll likely be very little hands on. At university you'll mainly be dealing with equations, designs, computer software packages, reports etc. After graduation there will be more opportunity to work onsite if you work for a construction contractor, if that's what you're looking for. Or you could work for a consultancy in a design role and be office based, with some site visits.

I didn't do civil - I did mechanical.
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DD_vendz
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(Original post by Smack)
I've seen some statistics that suggest that civil & structural engineering has a more equal gender ratio than most other disciplines. Although it's still heavily skewed. I think, out of the main disciplines, chemical has the most equal ratio.



Practical in what way? As I said, it's an engineering degree, not an apprenticeship, so there'll likely be very little hands on. At university you'll mainly be dealing with equations, designs, computer software packages, reports etc. After graduation there will be more opportunity to work onsite if you work for a construction contractor, if that's what you're looking for. Or you could work for a consultancy in a design role and be office based, with some site visits.

I didn't do civil - I did mechanical.
I would also like to know would i meet a range of ppl in engineering, specifically civil engineering. I dont want to gobdo abdegree with just boys i would like there to be a mix
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DD_vendz
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(Original post by Smack)
I've seen some statistics that suggest that civil & structural engineering has a more equal gender ratio than most other disciplines. Although it's still heavily skewed. I think, out of the main disciplines, chemical has the most equal ratio.



Practical in what way? As I said, it's an engineering degree, not an apprenticeship, so there'll likely be very little hands on. At university you'll mainly be dealing with equations, designs, computer software packages, reports etc. After graduation there will be more opportunity to work onsite if you work for a construction contractor, if that's what you're looking for. Or you could work for a consultancy in a design role and be office based, with some site visits.

I didn't do civil - I did mechanical.
I would also like to know since u did mechanical how hard was it. Did u enjoy it. How many hours and days a week. And did u do part time jobs if so what part time job would u recommend
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Smack
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(Original post by DD_vendz)
I would also like to know since u did mechanical how hard was it. Did u enjoy it. How many hours and days a week. And did u do part time jobs if so what part time job would u recommend
I think how hard an engineering degree is seems to be largely dependent on how good at maths you are, since the bulk of the work involves solving equations, a bit similar to maths and physics at school. I can't remember how many hours I worked as it wasn't something I measured. Maybe I should have worked a bit more, though.

Most engineering students will be male. I wouldn't let that affect your decision at all though.

In terms of a job, I didn't have one, however having one might have helped with my time management. I obviously wouldn't recommend having something that interferes with your studies, but plenty of people manage to combine a part-time job with their studies, and successfully obtain good grades too. It's all about time management.
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