Could I apply to engineering related Masters with a BSc. Mathematics Watch

countduckula1906
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Hi everyone

I finished my BSc. Mathematics with a First Class (University of Sussex) in July and I'm thinking of applying for a masters for 2020 entry. I'm really interested in broadening my knowledge and would like to apply for an engineering related masters such as chemical, nuclear or mechanical engineering etc and thus potentially increase my career prospects.

The Universities I'm interested are Imperial, Oxford, Cam, Kings college and UCL.

Each university has its own 'entry requirement' - some being as vague as 'any 2.1 degree will be considered' and some can be very specific.

For example entry requirements for Advanced Chemical Engineering at Imperial are, 'min requirement is a 2.1 degree in engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, life sciences or biomedical sciences'

where as Petroleum Engineering at Imperial asks for, 'a first-class degree in science or engineering'.

Generally would it be regarded silly (by admissions) of me to apply for such courses as these with a BSc. Maths? Even though the entry requirements of some state mathematics - what are the real world likelihood...

Or am I better off applying for stats, computer sci/cyber stuff like most other maths grads?
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tacobeth
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if they say it in their requirements then it should be fine. I’d say go for it, what’s the worst that could happen? Even if you don’t get into those Uni’s you could still get into another one
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Smack
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(Original post by countduckula1906)
Hi everyone

I finished my BSc. Mathematics with a First Class (University of Sussex) in July and I'm thinking of applying for a masters for 2020 entry. I'm really interested in broadening my knowledge and would like to apply for an engineering related masters such as chemical, nuclear or mechanical engineering etc and thus potentially increase my career prospects.

The Universities I'm interested are Imperial, Oxford, Cam, Kings college and UCL.

Each university has its own 'entry requirement' - some being as vague as 'any 2.1 degree will be considered' and some can be very specific.

For example entry requirements for Advanced Chemical Engineering at Imperial are, 'min requirement is a 2.1 degree in engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, life sciences or biomedical sciences'

where as Petroleum Engineering at Imperial asks for, 'a first-class degree in science or engineering'.

Generally would it be regarded silly (by admissions) of me to apply for such courses as these with a BSc. Maths? Even though the entry requirements of some state mathematics - what are the real world likelihood...

Or am I better off applying for stats, computer sci/cyber stuff like most other maths grads?
Suitably qualified applicants, i.e. those that meet the entry requirements, don't generally struggle to get into engineering degrees, at either undergrad or masters. Aside from perhaps a few exceptions (I'm guessing), they're just not that competitive.

A bigger potential issue may come with securing work in engineering after graduating: as with many fields, work experience helps a lot with this, and a lot of candidates will have completed work placements (or done other relevant activities, e.g. Formula Student). So, do you actually want to go into engineering? I wouldn't recommend studying an engineering MSc merely to broaden your knowledge without the intent of progressing into the career.
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countduckula1906
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(Original post by Smack)
Suitably qualified applicants, i.e. those that meet the entry requirements, don't generally struggle to get into engineering degrees, at either undergrad or masters. Aside from perhaps a few exceptions (I'm guessing), they're just not that competitive.

A bigger potential issue may come with securing work in engineering after graduating: as with many fields, work experience helps a lot with this, and a lot of candidates will have completed work placements (or done other relevant activities, e.g. Formula Student). So, do you actually want to go into engineering? I wouldn't recommend studying an engineering MSc merely to broaden your knowledge without the intent of progressing into the career.
That's actually really helpful, I never thought of the respective competition between master degree subjects. Well yes, I havebeen deliberating the prospect of a engineering career very deeply and realised quite quickly that it would be somewhat challenging to break into the profession with just a BSc maths
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Smack
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(Original post by countduckula1906)
That's actually really helpful, I never thought of the respective competition between master degree subjects. Well yes, I havebeen deliberating the prospect of a engineering career very deeply and realised quite quickly that it would be somewhat challenging to break into the profession with just a BSc maths
Is there any particular area or discipline of engineering you're interested in?
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countduckula1906
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(Original post by Smack)
Is there any particular area or discipline of engineering you're interested in
Chemical or nuclear engineering (leaning more towards chem). Hence the worry I would instantly get rejected with a maths degree
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