Learning violin as an adult? Watch

Kostapov
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I am a 19-year-old guy and I've always wanted to learn the violin, I'm wondering how difficult it is to learn the instrument as an adult? I have never played on any instrument before and I can't afford a teacher. Thus, I will have to learn according to a YouTube tutorial. How expensive is a starter instrument? I would just want something that sounds ok, and plays well.
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mgi
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(Original post by Kostapov)
I am a 19-year-old guy and I've always wanted to learn the violin, I'm wondering how difficult it is to learn the instrument as an adult? I have never played on any instrument before and I can't afford a teacher. Thus, I will have to learn according to a YouTube tutorial. How expensive is a starter instrument? I would just want something that sounds ok, and plays well.
You could learn to read music and the basics of violin playing on Youtube. If you could eventually get a tutor you will most likely make more progress and probably be less likely to get into bad habits.
Stentor or Mendini violins are good for beginners. On Amazon you can get one for less than £150. I taught myself to read music and play the piano from YouTube videos then I got a tutor to help me develop more quickly and gain better habits!
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YaliaV
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I can’t give you specific advice, but I’ve learned new skills as an adult. Adults are more self-conscious and critical, so be prepared to make mistakes and get frustrated. Other than that, there’s absolutely nothing to stop you. Just have fun and don’t let fear hold you back. Good luck!
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vintriqit553
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Find a good place to rent a violin. Find a place to learn (specifically one where they teach adults) as this could be more effective if you're going the serious aproach. Always, ALWAYS practise. Even if it's boring, practise until you become good (but don't overdo it!) Bring fun into it, you need to enjoy it, too. There are channels on youtube that can help you but I reckon an instructor is better because you can get feedback. If you like violin or classical music in general, go check out TwosetViolin! They aren't a teaching channel, well sometimes they do but mostly they do comedic videos that helps me get through rough times w/ my violin lol. Good luck
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remussjhj01
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Yeah, definitely, plenty of people don't start until later in life.
Forewarning-your fingers may bleed (it's the same for all string instruments) so just be careful and don't practice for too long to start with. I would really say no more than about 1/2 hour until you build up callouses (you'll be able to tell, the skin on the tips of your fingers will be hard), then you can gradually increase it. Most serious musicians aim for about 2-3 hours a day, but you probably won't NEED that long, as you'll have less musical commitments (concerts, performance exams etc). Also keep your left hand nails short (or right hand nails if you're left handed).
Get a beginners repertoire book. It should give you the basics of the fingerboard, reading music, bowing techniques maybe some scales, as well as some simple pieces to try. You can get some cheap violins for probably like £60-70.
I know some people are very anti grade (I used to be), but they are a good way to keep track of your progress, give you something to aim towards and if someone asks how good you are, you can actually tell them. Once you're comfortable with your beginners repertoire book, if you want to do grades look into which board to go with (ABRSM and Trinity College are the main ones. I do trinity but idk how they are for violin) and get the book(s) you need.
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vintriqit553
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(Original post by remussjhj01)
build up callouses
Advantages of being a string musician, taking the toast out of the toaster without getting burn because you have callouses.
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GreenCub
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It's perfectly possible to learn an instrument as an adult and get very good at it. A lot of people will say things about how you need to have "started at a very young age" to get good, but this only really applies for potential professional violinists. Also an advantage of learning as an adult is that you'll be much more disciplined when it comes to practising than a child.
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errrr99
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You need a full size 4/4 violin and fibre-glass (cheapest) bow, some rosin for the bow...pretty sure the whole lot is less than £100 made in China these days.

As you are 19, do it now, your body is flexible enough to learn to hold the fiddle between chin and shoulder-rest. BTW fancy shoulder rests cost around £25 - £40. It's uncomfortable. Ask anyone you know to try out theirs to get an idea which model of rest will suit you. Find your nearest violin shop if necessary to try out shoulder rests. Violin needs to be stable between your chin and your shoulder.
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