sithmi2018123
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hi, im rlly struggling can u help me think of ideas for providing a safe and comfortable home especially aiming towards children?
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sithmi2018123
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could i do a cat bed? but have it focus on the problem of fireworks ? so using a scent diffuser to calm the cat down and give it safe place to hide? could that meet the context criteria?
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Emily~3695
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Hi, I’m doing my NEA this Year as well but doing the sustainable future context, some people on my class have thought of things like baby proofing certain things etc but I don’t think anyone’s actually thought of anything that original have u got any ideas that you could potentially develop, I’m happy to help where I can 😊
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Freya15
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im struggling too i thought of making a lamp but its not very original. Someone help me pls.
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aeneas_son
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Hello, fellow ex DT student here!
Having just finished my gcse, i definitely know how panicked you're feeling. First of all, calm down! You will get there in the end; you just need to know what you're aiming for. Second of all- you can trust whatever advice I give you. (not meaning to toot my own horn but)I got a 9 in DT overall, and 92% on my coursework- could have gotten higher if i didn't accidentally delete my portfolio and hour before it was due and lose about 1/4 of it, then have to rush the last few pages (please, back up your NEA if youre doing it on a computer).

Prepare for an essay, my friend!

Whilst your idea seems wonderful, you need to remember that the examiners are looking for creativity. I would recommend first choosing a main issue to focus on that falls within your chosen brief. You seem to have done that, but i also feel like you've taken one idea that you really want to make, and tried to create an issue based on that, instead of finding an issue and creating a solution for that issue.

NEA is as much research as it is development of ideas as it is actual practical work. If you dont have the statistics and data to back up this 'issue' that you have chosen, the examiners won't be impressed and they will mark you low. Choose an issue that actually exists- dont just create one. And choose an issue that you can prove is an important issue that people (or animals in your case) need solving. Use primary, secondary data, surveys, personal experience, whatever. But bottom line, dont try and create an issue that you think would suite a design you want to make; it should be the other way round. You need to find a problem, then decide on a solution for that problem.

I'll outline the rough steps here for you;
1. EXPLORE- research ALL the different issues that surround a home- what makes a home uncomfortable? who in homes are usually the most uncomfortable? what time of day is that? where in the home? what possible threats could arise from that?
I recommend making a mind map of just the 'who (does it affect- target market), what (is the issue), why (is it an issue), how (can it be solved)', but thinking of many 'root' problems (the 'what' aspect). Then, offer a small solution for each of these problems- just like your cat bed. This solution would be very underdeveloped of course, because that solution hasn't undergone any actual research, but it shows the examiner that your main focus is to help and design for good, rather than just design something for the hell of it, or because you want to make something for yourself. From these issues that you've explored, choose one to hone it on. This will be your specific issue that you aim to fix with your design

2. RESEARCH- look into the statistical side of your problem. Your problem is most likely (or should be) very broad- eg, 'cats scared at home due to several hazards (you want to choose an idea that you can explore thoroughly). Then, try and research what exactly scares cats the most. What is the effect of this? Your aim is to convince the examiner that this problem that you've chosen is a real problem and an important one (not important as in life-or-death, but you know what I mean). Try throw in some primary and secondary data, pictures, surveys etc. Examiners love that!
If you do your research right, you might even find that you come across a more interesting 'sub-problem' within that overall issue that you chose to explore. For me, when i chose the issue of road safety due to uneducated drivers (for my brief of 'supporting the needs of the elderly), I focused on the issue of the elderly not being visible to careless drivers, thus making them more susceptible to accidents. I researched how many deaths per year occurred due to road accidents, and the age groups, etc, and interviewed my grandparents who live in a developing country. All of this allowed me to sort of 'combine' two issues that i found after researching more. I combined the issue of visiblity, with the issue of difficulty crossing the road, to decide on the 'category' of product. It seems like you're at this stage- you want to focus of comfort of the cat in terms of aroma but also physical security. It's still very early on in the year, so your idea will change and develop with time. But rather than two very separate products, ie bed and aroma diffuser, could you perhaps combine the two? At this stage, you arent suppose to know WHAT you will design, but i think its important to start thinking about the 'category' or 'type' or product. (eg, walking aid for me- not necessarily a walking stick. i then added my own twists to it)

3. MARKET RESEARCH- see what already exists! if you cant find the 'type' of product you want, then try search up 'things that help cats calm down' or something like that- remember, examiners want to see you exploring, not justifying a final product yet! Avoid design fixation! Look at the work of others, analyse their products, and evaluate it to see what aspects you do and dont like, and what does and doesnt work in the market. What i did that helped me a lot was i collated all of the positive aspects of the existing products i analysed, and tried to see what designs i could come up with that contianed those aspects. Try it!

4. FINALISING PRODUCT CATEGORY- literally, at the end of your product analysis, say 'i have decided to make an xyz'. The next few pages are going to be the fun part

4.5- WRITE A BRIEF AND SPECIFICATION- you can always change this later, but they are really important! They're essentially your personal 'checklist' to a successful product. If youre stuck on how to write one; google search!

5. INITIAL IDEAS- brain vomit! Think of as many unrelated (maybe slightly related- we all have our limits) CREATIVE ideas as you can. About 10 designs at least? They dont even have to be your chosen product category! If you design something that your really like, but it doesnt match the products that you analysed or the type that you chose, thats fine! It still shows the examiners that you actually have ideas. As long as you still include those 'positive' aspects of the product analysis, and as long as your product still solves the issue, youre all good! Try really flexing your art skills here- isometric, 2 point perspective, the whole shabang. This is your chance to show your creativity and show that youre avoiding design fixation. At the end of it all, i recommend evaluating your designs- maybe getting a (relevant) 3rd party to rate them? And then from here choose the 'best' one (or two, if you wanna combine designs) to go ahead with into the development stages.

6. DEVELOPMENT- this is the most intense and longest part of the whole NEA, in my opinion. It only makes up about 2-4 pages in your NEA, but it takes a good chunk of your time! I recommend really taking your time here though- this is what will decide your final design! Spend time making sketches, changing and removing and adding to that finalised initial idea, making 3D models to demonstrate function, maybe even some models to scale! Yes, you're trying to show the examiner that you're really making your design perfect by making prototypes, but you should also use this development bit to perfect your design for yourself. Make a prototype, show it to a 'customer' and see what they think, record their feedback to include in your NEA as evidence of evaluation...and basically keep going until you're 99% sure that this is EXACTLY what will solve that issue you've been working on since the start. I said 99% and not 100%, because the design still might change- and examiners love that too! It shows you're facing unexpected challenges head-on and making adaptations swiftly. And remember: JUSTIFY EVERY. CHANGE. THAT. YOU. MAKE.

7. THE FINAL IDEA AND THE PLAN- literally make instructions, and exploded isometric diagram, and a final idea sheet (like a fashion show but for your product). Make LOTS of sketches, and then on a separate sheet make sketches with dimensions and instructions to show that you know exactly what you're about to do (and who said you cant go back and change things to pretend like you had everything planned from the start?)

8. THE MAKING- I'm sure you know how this goes. Just make sure everything is gorgeous. Document every step with HQ photos, which you should annotate later- sort of like a timeline in chronological order. The photos are to show that you actually did make a product lol. Remember, finish is everything! Don't leave any edges scruffy or badly cut- yes they will notice!

9. EVALUATION- this is actually something you should have been doing constantly throughout the design process. Anytime you change, add, or remove anything from your design, you're evaluating! Just make sure to tell the examiner what did'nt work, and why you think the change you made will benefit the design's function. But an overall, 'general' evaluation to put in the end is still important! Then you're basically done!! I would recommend evaluating the product yourself first, against the product brief/spec ideally, to see how well you actually solved your issue. Then (if you can), as your target user to evaluate it (again, i got my grandma to evaluate mine). Remember to point out what went well, but be very critical too. And list improvements! They want to see that you know how to fix problems as well as you know how to find them

And thats it! I recommend having one whole page of just photos of your final product, in a lot of different angles and lighting, to really sell it.

Sorry for this massive essay! I got a bit enthusiastic. Man, i miss DT- enjoy the NEA whilst it lasts, because theory is a *****. Also, try really hard on the NEA; it definitely will raise your grade if you do!

Hope this helped you! Feel free to ask me anymore questions.
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sithmi2018123
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(Original post by aeneas_son)
Hello, fellow ex DT student here!
Having just finished my gcse, i definitely know how panicked you're feeling. First of all, calm down! You will get there in the end; you just need to know what you're aiming for. Second of all- you can trust whatever advice I give you. (not meaning to toot my own horn but)I got a 9 in DT overall, and 92% on my coursework- could have gotten higher if i didn't accidentally delete my portfolio and hour before it was due and lose about 1/4 of it, then have to rush the last few pages (please, back up your NEA if youre doing it on a computer).

Prepare for an essay, my friend!

Whilst your idea seems wonderful, you need to remember that the examiners are looking for creativity. I would recommend first choosing a main issue to focus on that falls within your chosen brief. You seem to have done that, but i also feel like you've taken one idea that you really want to make, and tried to create an issue based on that, instead of finding an issue and creating a solution for that issue.

NEA is as much research as it is development of ideas as it is actual practical work. If you dont have the statistics and data to back up this 'issue' that you have chosen, the examiners won't be impressed and they will mark you low. Choose an issue that actually exists- dont just create one. And choose an issue that you can prove is an important issue that people (or animals in your case) need solving. Use primary, secondary data, surveys, personal experience, whatever. But bottom line, dont try and create an issue that you think would suite a design you want to make; it should be the other way round. You need to find a problem, then decide on a solution for that problem.

I'll outline the rough steps here for you;
1. EXPLORE- research ALL the different issues that surround a home- what makes a home uncomfortable? who in homes are usually the most uncomfortable? what time of day is that? where in the home? what possible threats could arise from that?
I recommend making a mind map of just the 'who (does it affect- target market), what (is the issue), why (is it an issue), how (can it be solved)', but thinking of many 'root' problems (the 'what' aspect). Then, offer a small solution for each of these problems- just like your cat bed. This solution would be very underdeveloped of course, because that solution hasn't undergone any actual research, but it shows the examiner that your main focus is to help and design for good, rather than just design something for the hell of it, or because you want to make something for yourself. From these issues that you've explored, choose one to hone it on. This will be your specific issue that you aim to fix with your design

2. RESEARCH- look into the statistical side of your problem. Your problem is most likely (or should be) very broad- eg, 'cats scared at home due to several hazards (you want to choose an idea that you can explore thoroughly). Then, try and research what exactly scares cats the most. What is the effect of this? Your aim is to convince the examiner that this problem that you've chosen is a real problem and an important one (not important as in life-or-death, but you know what I mean). Try throw in some primary and secondary data, pictures, surveys etc. Examiners love that!
If you do your research right, you might even find that you come across a more interesting 'sub-problem' within that overall issue that you chose to explore. For me, when i chose the issue of road safety due to uneducated drivers (for my brief of 'supporting the needs of the elderly), I focused on the issue of the elderly not being visible to careless drivers, thus making them more susceptible to accidents. I researched how many deaths per year occurred due to road accidents, and the age groups, etc, and interviewed my grandparents who live in a developing country. All of this allowed me to sort of 'combine' two issues that i found after researching more. I combined the issue of visiblity, with the issue of difficulty crossing the road, to decide on the 'category' of product. It seems like you're at this stage- you want to focus of comfort of the cat in terms of aroma but also physical security. It's still very early on in the year, so your idea will change and develop with time. But rather than two very separate products, ie bed and aroma diffuser, could you perhaps combine the two? At this stage, you arent suppose to know WHAT you will design, but i think its important to start thinking about the 'category' or 'type' or product. (eg, walking aid for me- not necessarily a walking stick. i then added my own twists to it)

3. MARKET RESEARCH- see what already exists! if you cant find the 'type' of product you want, then try search up 'things that help cats calm down' or something like that- remember, examiners want to see you exploring, not justifying a final product yet! Avoid design fixation! Look at the work of others, analyse their products, and evaluate it to see what aspects you do and dont like. What i did that helped me a lot was i collated all of the positive aspects of the existing products i analysed, and tried to see what designs i could come up with that contianed those aspects. Try it!

4. FINALISING PRODUCT CATEGORY- literally, at the end of your product analysis, say 'i have decided to make xyz'. The next few pages are going to be the fun part

4.5- WRITE A BRIEF AND SPECIFICATION- you can always change this later, but they are really important! They're essentially your personal 'checklist' to a successful product. If youre stuck on how to write one; google search!

5. INITIAL IDEAS- brain vomit! Think of as many unrelated (maybe slightly related- we all have our limits) CREATIVE ideas as you can. About 10 designs at least? They dont even have to be your chosen product category! If you design something that your really like, but it doesnt match the products that you analysed or the type that you chose, thats fine! As long as you still include those 'positive' aspects of the product analysis, and as long as your product still solves the issue, youre all good! Try really flexing your art skills here- isometric, 2 point perspective, the whole shabang. This is your chance to show your creativity and show that youre avoiding design fixation. At the end of it all, i recommend evaluating your designs- maybe getting a (relevant) 3rd party to rate them? And then from here choose the 'best' one (or two, if you wanna combine designs) to go ahead with into the development stages.

6. DEVELOPMENT- this is the most intense and longest part of the whole NEA, in my opinion. It only makes up about 2-4 pages in your NEA, but it takes a good chunk of your time! I recommend really taking your time here though- this is what will decide your final design! Spend time making sketches, changing and added to that finalised initial idea, making 3D models to demonstrate function, maybe even some models to scale! Yes, you're trying to show the examiner that you're really making your design perfect by making prototypes, but you should also use this development bit to perfect your design for yourself. Make a portfolio, show it to a 'customer' and see what they think, and basically keep going until you're 99% sure that this is EXACTLY what will solve that issue you've been working on since the start. I said 99% and not 100%, because the design still might change- and examiners love that too! It shows you're facing unexpected challenges head-on and making adaptations swiftly. And remember: JUSTIFY EVERY. CHANGE. THAT. YOU. MAKE.

7. THE FINAL IDEA AND THE PLAN- literally make instructions, and exploded isometric diagram, and a final idea sheet (like a fashion show but for your product). Make LOTS of sketches, and then on a separate sheet make sketches with dimensions and instructions to show that you know exactly what you're about to do (and who said you cant go back and change things to pretend like you had everything planned from the start?)

8. THE MAKING- I'm sure you know how this goes. Just make sure everything is gorgeous. Document every step with HQ photos, which you should annotate later- sort of like a timeline in chronological order. The photos are to show that you actually did make a product lol. Remember, finish is everything! Don't leave any edges scruffy or badly cut- yes they will notice!

9. EVALUATION- and you're basically done!! I would recommend evaluating the product yourself first, against the product brief/spec ideally, to see how well you actually solved your issue. Then (if you can), as your target user to evaluate it (again, i got my grandma to evaluate mine). Remember to point out what went well, but be very critical too. And list improvements! They want to see that you know how to fix problems as well as you know how to find them

And thats it! I recommend having one whole page of just photos of your final product, in a lot of different angles and lighting, to really sell it.

Sorry for this massive essay! I got a bit enthusiastic. Man, i miss DT- enjoy the NEA whilst it lasts, because theory is a *****. Also, try really hard on the NEA; it definitely will raise your grade if you do!

Hope this helped you! Feel free to ask me anymore questions.
hi, omg thank you so so so much i didn't really expect any one to help me this much but it is very very useful thank youuuu
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CoolCavy
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What ideas have you come up with yourself so far? look at existing problems with safety and comfort in the home for children as a starting point, once you know the problems you can design a solution
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aeneas_son
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(Original post by sithmi2018123)
hi, omg thank you so so so much i didn't really expect any one to help me this much but it is very very useful thank youuuu
no problem! just remember to have fun and enjoy what you're doing and it'll all be a breeze
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lucyddf72
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It’s not about decor... it’s about routines, boundaries, praise, reinforcement, acceptance, safety etc
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sithmi2018123
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Hi do you know any way of making wood soundproof like do I layer it orrr ??
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aeneas_son
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(Original post by sithmi2018123)
Hi do you know any way of making wood soundproof like do I layer it orrr ??
i think layer it with perhaps foam in between? like one layer of a hardwood or plywood, then foam, then close it off with another layer of the same wood? there are more costly alternatives, such as mass-loaded vinyl, but you need to be conscious of cost (both for yourself and as something you evaluate lol). most insulators should do the job, just avoid something 'empty' like wool.

speaking of evaluation, i just wanted to say that examiners pay attention to your evaluation a lot. i used this 'criteria' called ACCESSFM- aesthetic, (suitability for) customer, cost, environmental impact, size, safety, function (like it is feasible), and manufacture (again, is it easily made or is it overly complex). essentially its a list of that aspects in your design you should evaluate, and then feel free to chuck in/remove certain aspects.

but sorry, im not that much of an expert with soundproofing. hope this helps!

edit: i say hardwood because they're generally more dense woods with more 'soundproofing' ability- plywood is good because it already contains layers. but a flimsy and light hardwood like balsa wouldn't be ay good, so make sure not to use things like that lol
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Freya15
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Does anyone have any suggestions for a product that I could make
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Freya15
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If I make a product does it have to be safe and comfortable or can it be either safe or comfortable
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CoolCavy
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If I make a product does it have to be safe and comfortable or can it be either safe or comfortable
Why would it be one or the other? Successful products are ergonomic and safe. If your product isn't safe in the real world a lawsuit will be coming your way. You have to think as though you are manufacturing this in real life
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intelligent1234
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Hello, fellow ex DT student here!
Having just finished my gcse, i definitely know how panicked you're feeling. First of all, calm down! You will get there in the end; you just need to know what you're aiming for. Second of all- you can trust whatever advice I give you. (not meaning to toot my own horn but)I got a 9 in DT overall, and 92% on my coursework- could have gotten higher if i didn't accidentally delete my portfolio and hour before it was due and lose about 1/4 of it, then have to rush the last few pages (please, back up your NEA if youre doing it on a computer).

Prepare for an essay, my friend!

Whilst your idea seems wonderful, you need to remember that the examiners are looking for creativity. I would recommend first choosing a main issue to focus on that falls within your chosen brief. You seem to have done that, but i also feel like you've taken one idea that you really want to make, and tried to create an issue based on that, instead of finding an issue and creating a solution for that issue.

NEA is as much research as it is development of ideas as it is actual practical work. If you dont have the statistics and data to back up this 'issue' that you have chosen, the examiners won't be impressed and they will mark you low. Choose an issue that actually exists- dont just create one. And choose an issue that you can prove is an important issue that people (or animals in your case) need solving. Use primary, secondary data, surveys, personal experience, whatever. But bottom line, dont try and create an issue that you think would suite a design you want to make; it should be the other way round. You need to find a problem, then decide on a solution for that problem.

I'll outline the rough steps here for you;
1. EXPLORE- research ALL the different issues that surround a home- what makes a home uncomfortable? who in homes are usually the most uncomfortable? what time of day is that? where in the home? what possible threats could arise from that?
I recommend making a mind map of just the 'who (does it affect- target market), what (is the issue), why (is it an issue), how (can it be solved)', but thinking of many 'root' problems (the 'what' aspect). Then, offer a small solution for each of these problems- just like your cat bed. This solution would be very underdeveloped of course, because that solution hasn't undergone any actual research, but it shows the examiner that your main focus is to help and design for good, rather than just design something for the hell of it, or because you want to make something for yourself. From these issues that you've explored, choose one to hone it on. This will be your specific issue that you aim to fix with your design

2. RESEARCH- look into the statistical side of your problem. Your problem is most likely (or should be) very broad- eg, 'cats scared at home due to several hazards (you want to choose an idea that you can explore thoroughly). Then, try and research what exactly scares cats the most. What is the effect of this? Your aim is to convince the examiner that this problem that you've chosen is a real problem and an important one (not important as in life-or-death, but you know what I mean). Try throw in some primary and secondary data, pictures, surveys etc. Examiners love that!
If you do your research right, you might even find that you come across a more interesting 'sub-problem' within that overall issue that you chose to explore. For me, when i chose the issue of road safety due to uneducated drivers (for my brief of 'supporting the needs of the elderly), I focused on the issue of the elderly not being visible to careless drivers, thus making them more susceptible to accidents. I researched how many deaths per year occurred due to road accidents, and the age groups, etc, and interviewed my grandparents who live in a developing country. All of this allowed me to sort of 'combine' two issues that i found after researching more. I combined the issue of visiblity, with the issue of difficulty crossing the road, to decide on the 'category' of product. It seems like you're at this stage- you want to focus of comfort of the cat in terms of aroma but also physical security. It's still very early on in the year, so your idea will change and develop with time. But rather than two very separate products, ie bed and aroma diffuser, could you perhaps combine the two? At this stage, you arent suppose to know WHAT you will design, but i think its important to start thinking about the 'category' or 'type' or product. (eg, walking aid for me- not necessarily a walking stick. i then added my own twists to it)

3. MARKET RESEARCH- see what already exists! if you cant find the 'type' of product you want, then try search up 'things that help cats calm down' or something like that- remember, examiners want to see you exploring, not justifying a final product yet! Avoid design fixation! Look at the work of others, analyse their products, and evaluate it to see what aspects you do and dont like, and what does and doesnt work in the market. What i did that helped me a lot was i collated all of the positive aspects of the existing products i analysed, and tried to see what designs i could come up with that contianed those aspects. Try it!

4. FINALISING PRODUCT CATEGORY- literally, at the end of your product analysis, say 'i have decided to make an xyz'. The next few pages are going to be the fun part

4.5- WRITE A BRIEF AND SPECIFICATION- you can always change this later, but they are really important! They're essentially your personal 'checklist' to a successful product. If youre stuck on how to write one; google search!

5. INITIAL IDEAS- brain vomit! Think of as many unrelated (maybe slightly related- we all have our limits) CREATIVE ideas as you can. About 10 designs at least? They dont even have to be your chosen product category! If you design something that your really like, but it doesnt match the products that you analysed or the type that you chose, thats fine! It still shows the examiners that you actually have ideas. As long as you still include those 'positive' aspects of the product analysis, and as long as your product still solves the issue, youre all good! Try really flexing your art skills here- isometric, 2 point perspective, the whole shabang. This is your chance to show your creativity and show that youre avoiding design fixation. At the end of it all, i recommend evaluating your designs- maybe getting a (relevant) 3rd party to rate them? And then from here choose the 'best' one (or two, if you wanna combine designs) to go ahead with into the development stages.

6. DEVELOPMENT- this is the most intense and longest part of the whole NEA, in my opinion. It only makes up about 2-4 pages in your NEA, but it takes a good chunk of your time! I recommend really taking your time here though- this is what will decide your final design! Spend time making sketches, changing and removing and adding to that finalised initial idea, making 3D models to demonstrate function, maybe even some models to scale! Yes, you're trying to show the examiner that you're really making your design perfect by making prototypes, but you should also use this development bit to perfect your design for yourself. Make a prototype, show it to a 'customer' and see what they think, record their feedback to include in your NEA as evidence of evaluation...and basically keep going until you're 99% sure that this is EXACTLY what will solve that issue you've been working on since the start. I said 99% and not 100%, because the design still might change- and examiners love that too! It shows you're facing unexpected challenges head-on and making adaptations swiftly. And remember: JUSTIFY EVERY. CHANGE. THAT. YOU. MAKE.

7. THE FINAL IDEA AND THE PLAN- literally make instructions, and exploded isometric diagram, and a final idea sheet (like a fashion show but for your product). Make LOTS of sketches, and then on a separate sheet make sketches with dimensions and instructions to show that you know exactly what you're about to do (and who said you cant go back and change things to pretend like you had everything planned from the start?)

8. THE MAKING- I'm sure you know how this goes. Just make sure everything is gorgeous. Document every step with HQ photos, which you should annotate later- sort of like a timeline in chronological order. The photos are to show that you actually did make a product lol. Remember, finish is everything! Don't leave any edges scruffy or badly cut- yes they will notice!

9. EVALUATION- this is actually something you should have been doing constantly throughout the design process. Anytime you change, add, or remove anything from your design, you're evaluating! Just make sure to tell the examiner what did'nt work, and why you think the change you made will benefit the design's function. But an overall, 'general' evaluation to put in the end is still important! Then you're basically done!! I would recommend evaluating the product yourself first, against the product brief/spec ideally, to see how well you actually solved your issue. Then (if you can), as your target user to evaluate it (again, i got my grandma to evaluate mine). Remember to point out what went well, but be very critical too. And list improvements! They want to see that you know how to fix problems as well as you know how to find them

And thats it! I recommend having one whole page of just photos of your final product, in a lot of different angles and lighting, to really sell it.

Sorry for this massive essay! I got a bit enthusiastic. Man, i miss DT- enjoy the NEA whilst it lasts, because theory is a *****. Also, try really hard on the NEA; it definitely will raise your grade if you do!

Hope this helped you! Feel free to ask me anymore questions.
thank you so much for your time that you spend on that , really really helpful. now, have to manage a lot of things in less time.
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aeneas_son
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thank you so much for your time that you spend on that , really really helpful. now, have to manage a lot of things in less time.
no problem haha. feel free to ask me any questions you arent sure about! the whole process is still kinda fresh in my mind (and i still miss dt lmao).

if you're in y11, you have plenty of time, dont stress. i would say to make sure you have a final 'general' design ready by at most the end of this year though, and start developing and refining that idea in the new year- at least, thats the timeline that i worked with. but try do all of that stuff earlier if possible because i was in a right mess when we had to hand in our coursework in april oops.

i would send my NEA here, but im not sure if im allowed to yet, and i haven't even gotten it back from my teacher lmao. but when i get it back, i'll try link the electronic copy here so you have some sort of an example to see! (beware, there were many flaws in mine because it was so r u s h e d, so dont have too many expectations.) but if i do end up sending a link, please try not to copy my language or work in any sort of way- you could get penalised massively for it, and i might even get in trouble lol, because technically you arent even allowed to have a template to work off of . just use my NEA to see the level of detail i approached it in, and other stuff.

goog luck!
Last edited by aeneas_son; 2 months ago
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sam211102
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start off with a mind map and think about what each section means and how it can be safe comfortable and for the home you can use a website called coggle
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hihow is the idea for a chair stool
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