Answers212121
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Are there any conversion courses into law for non-law graduates, similar to BPP's courses? Universities worldwide have been offering graduate conversion courses and I'm just wondering if Oxbridge offer one?

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Estreth
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Not a conversion course as such but Oxford has the BA in Jurisprudence with Senior Status, which you complete in two years rather than three:

https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/admissions/...-senior-status
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JohanGRK
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Only a handful of unis offer the GDL. The ones that do tend to be law schools (not law faculties), and they teach it as they would teach a vocational degree.

Quite a few reputable unis offer senior status LLBs - Oxbridge, QMUL, Leeds, etc.
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(Original post by Estreth)
Not a conversion course as such but Oxford has the BA in Jurisprudence with Senior Status, which you complete in two years rather than three:

https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/admissions/...-senior-status
Is this BA a recognised law degree or more of an academic law degree?
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Only a handful of unis offer the GDL. The ones that do tend to be law schools (not law faculties), and they teach it as they would teach a vocational degree.

Quite a few reputable unis offer senior status LLBs - Oxbridge, QMUL, Leeds, etc.
Am I right in thinking that LLBs are undergraduate degrees? How does undergraduate admissions work for graduates? Will I be assessed on my school results or my university results, or both?
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Catherine1973
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I am doing an llb as a graduate from next week. I applied as normal via ucas and yes had to complete my school details (fun trying to remember my exam boards from 1989! Luckily mum dig out all my exam certificates).
The criteria for all my university’s was just a 2.1 degree which I had. I had to get a transcript of my degree for one place, which wasn’t possible due to how long ago it was but they accepted a certified letter confirming my degree.
I think you also needed to show evidence of recent learning. This wasn’t explicit in the entry requirements but luckily I’d studied a gcse the year before so passed that one.
Good luck!
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Estreth
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(Original post by Answers212121)
Is this BA a recognised law degree or more of an academic law degree?
It is a qualifying law degree, but more academic than the GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law, colloquially referred to as a 'conversion course').
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Estreth
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(Original post by Answers212121)
Am I right in thinking that LLBs are undergraduate degrees? How does undergraduate admissions work for graduates? Will I be assessed on my school results or my university results, or both?
Both, but more recent qualifications are more significant. (So, for instance, if your GCSEs look subpar by Oxford standards, but you've since got an excellent first-class degree, the GCSEs will not harm you.)
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
I am doing an llb as a graduate from next week. I applied as normal via ucas and yes had to complete my school details (fun trying to remember my exam boards from 1989! Luckily mum dig out all my exam certificates).
The criteria for all my university’s was just a 2.1 degree which I had. I had to get a transcript of my degree for one place, which wasn’t possible due to how long ago it was but they accepted a certified letter confirming my degree.
I think you also needed to show evidence of recent learning. This wasn’t explicit in the entry requirements but luckily I’d studied a gcse the year before so passed that one.
Good luck!
Thank you and goodluck on your new journey!
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(Original post by Estreth)
It is a qualifying law degree...
That's all that matters. Thank you!!!
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(Original post by Estreth)
Both, but more recent qualifications are more significant. (So, for instance, if your GCSEs look subpar by Oxford standards, but you've since got an excellent first-class degree, the GCSEs will not harm you.)
Awesome, thank you!!
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mnot
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(Original post by Answers212121)
Are there any conversion courses into law for non-law graduates, similar to BPP's courses? Universities worldwide have been offering graduate conversion courses and I'm just wondering if Oxbridge offer one?

Thanks
Employers dont care where you get your legal conversion course, (I have no experience) but I know a guy who hires top law grads, and he told me the undergrad degree is what they look at and is where they view your degree from.
They know how the conversion courses work and hence dont care which one you pick.
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