What is the best way to study for A levels? Watch

Swifter221
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So I just started college and I am trying to find the best way to study at the moment. Any advice?
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R1C3
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Here are some of the techniques I used when I was studying at A-Level and what I still use during my University course (I am a final year Comp.Sci & Digital Forensics student):

Standard notebook
↳ Jotting down as much as I can in each class- highlighting, doodling, circling key themes
↳ Writing out information in a more thorough way later on in the day, checking everything I've written makes sense so that I can immediately seek further help if need be
↳ I can use this information to make flashcards, or spider diagrams (I haven't used spider-diagrams since A-level, but probably should)
Mini notebook
Noting any questions or information I'd like to double-check (explaining a topic/area to my tutor is a great way for me to remember information and ensure my notes are correct)
Flashcards
↳ Any information I'm certain is correct is put into a flashcard (I used to make these with card & string, but these days I use a program called Anki. Though in your case physical cards will definitely be better as you can check them virtually anywhere- even on the way to the exam I suppose)
↳ Sorting my flashcards by subject, going through at least one set per week
My subject tutor
↳ They love to answer questions on the content they teach, make sure I ask them any questions about the topic or related topics that interest you.
↳ Asking them where to find content relevant to my subjects for independent study (videos, youtube channels, books. My university does a book list for each course module, so I luckily always know what books to take out and have a read through)
Past papers
↳ A necessity at A-Level. The majority of subjects (as far as I'm aware) will have old exams available online. Print those off and have a bash. Do as many of those as you can; ensuring you self-mark harshly or see if your tutor has time to mark for you.

I hope this helps.
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Swifter221
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(Original post by Joshua224)
Here are some of the techniques I used when I was studying at A-Level and what I still use during my University course (I am a final year Comp.Sci & Digital Forensics student):

Standard notebook
↳ Jotting down as much as I can in each class- highlighting, doodling, circling key themes
↳ Writing out information in a more thorough way later on in the day, checking everything I've written makes sense so that I can immediately seek further help if need be
↳ I can use this information to make flashcards, or spider diagrams (I haven't used spider-diagrams since A-level, but probably should)
Mini notebook
Noting any questions or information I'd like to double-check (explaining a topic/area to my tutor is a great way for me to remember information and ensure my notes are correct)
Flashcards
↳ Any information I'm certain is correct is put into a flashcard (I used to make these with card & string, but these days I use a program called Anki. Though in your case physical cards will definitely be better as you can check them virtually anywhere- even on the way to the exam I suppose)
↳ Sorting my flashcards by subject, going through at least one set per week
My subject tutor
↳ They love to answer questions on the content they teach, make sure I ask them any questions about the topic or related topics that interest you.
↳ Asking them where to find content relevant to my subjects for independent study (videos, youtube channels, books. My university does a book list for each course module, so I luckily always know what books to take out and have a read through)
Past papers
↳ A necessity at A-Level. The majority of subjects (as far as I'm aware) will have old exams available online. Print those off and have a bash. Do as many of those as you can; ensuring you self-mark harshly or see if your tutor has time to mark for you.

I hope this helps.
Thank you for spending your time on helping! I appreciate this very much and good luck on your final year
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tacobeth
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i find that (as boring as it is) rewriting things over and over again gets it into my head, i also need a lot of different colours to separate them into key things etc and I put up posters of key formulas (I did biology) up in my room where I’d see them a lot. idk if this will help but good luck with your a-levels!
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Swifter221
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(Original post by Joshua224)
Here are some of the techniques I used when I was studying at A-Level and what I still use during my University course (I am a final year Comp.Sci & Digital Forensics student):

Standard notebook
↳ Jotting down as much as I can in each class- highlighting, doodling, circling key themes
↳ Writing out information in a more thorough way later on in the day, checking everything I've written makes sense so that I can immediately seek further help if need be
↳ I can use this information to make flashcards, or spider diagrams (I haven't used spider-diagrams since A-level, but probably should)
Mini notebook
Noting any questions or information I'd like to double-check (explaining a topic/area to my tutor is a great way for me to remember information and ensure my notes are correct)
Flashcards
↳ Any information I'm certain is correct is put into a flashcard (I used to make these with card & string, but these days I use a program called Anki. Though in your case physical cards will definitely be better as you can check them virtually anywhere- even on the way to the exam I suppose)
↳ Sorting my flashcards by subject, going through at least one set per week
My subject tutor
↳ They love to answer questions on the content they teach, make sure I ask them any questions about the topic or related topics that interest you.
↳ Asking them where to find content relevant to my subjects for independent study (videos, youtube channels, books. My university does a book list for each course module, so I luckily always know what books to take out and have a read through)
Past papers
↳ A necessity at A-Level. The majority of subjects (as far as I'm aware) will have old exams available online. Print those off and have a bash. Do as many of those as you can; ensuring you self-mark harshly or see if your tutor has time to mark for you.

I hope this helps.
Thank you for spending your time on helping! I appreciate this very much and good luck on your final year

(Original post by tacobeth)
i find that (as boring as it is) rewriting things over and over again gets it into my head, i also need a lot of different colours to separate them into key things etc and I put up posters of key formulas (I did biology) up in my room where I’d see them a lot. idk if this will help but good luck with your a-levels!
Thank you very much!!
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