Emmacore_
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HELP A GURL OUT- how do you get an A in A level spanish ????
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SmutsReport
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Live and breathe Spanish. Only watch films and videos in Spanish, go to Spain on every available holiday period, listen to Spanish audio files. Practice vocabulary 2 hours a day, ask your teacher any questions you have, get an extra tutor or join a local Spanish learning group. If you are really motivated and do that you should be approaching a good level in a few months and would need to fine tune your learning with your tutor and teacher after that for specific exams etc.

I never did a Spanish A-level though so don't take my word for it, I learned after when I stayed in Spain for a while. Good luck though !
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Froggo
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(Original post by Emmacore_)
HELP A GURL OUT- how do you get an A in A level spanish ????
You can't. End of
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MinaBee
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(Original post by Emmacore_)
HELP A GURL OUT- how do you get an A in A level spanish ????
Don't leave your IRP to the last minute! A lot of people in my class did this and it wasn't pretty. Make sure your two minute speech is fully prepared and come up with practice questions and answers to questions you think the examiner could ask you. Don't be tempted to memorise things word for word though because you'll end up sounding like a parrot and you will lose marks. Remember that your IRP needs to be analytical, not descriptive.

For the card section of the speaking exam, the examiner will be looking to see if you have relevant, cultural knowledge. It's important that you stay up to date with current affairs in Spain and Latin American countries and know about the cultural practices that can be found in the Spanish-speaking world. Also, try and memorise some statistics relating to your sub-topics (e.g if you're doing unemployment, remember that the youth unemployment rate in Spain is 40%).

Quizlet and Memrise are great websites for learning vocabulary. They have a lot of A-level Spanish flashcards sets that you can use or you can make your own. What I found really helpful when I was doing A-level Spanish was to read newspapers online such as El Mundo and La Vanguardia and then make a flashcard set using all the vocabulary I didn't know from the articles.

SpanishPod101 has some great videos on Youtube which you can practice listening with. For the essay exam, do mock essays and get your teacher to check them. Make sure you know a variety of good sentence starters and connectors and that you're able to use advanced grammar structures if you want to get the higher marks. Hodder also does some great revision guides for some of the books and films on the A-level spec so I'd definitely check them out to see if there's one for the book/film you're studying.

Make use of all the past papers, mark schemes, and examiner reports available to you. Practise, practise, practise and make sure that you don't leave anything until the last second. A-level Spanish is not a subject that can be crammed.

Good luck!
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DeliaMoreno
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(Original post by Emmacore_)
HELP A GURL OUT- how do you get an A in A level spanish ????
Hi Emmacore,
I am a Spanish teacher and, to be honest, I´ve seen an A coming from a non-native student only a few times in 10 years. I don´t want to disappoint you because it is possible but it is tough. If you are ready to do the following things, you´ll be very capable of it:
-Work, work and ... work. Any piece of homework must me done, marked, improved , ...whether it is sentences, paragraphs, essays, .... Ask your teacher for extra support if necessary, extra practice and do it!
-Use a method that suits you to study and remember vocabulary (mind maps, pictures, flashcards...)
-Meet other Spanish students from your class once a week, for example to practice each class topic. You can learn so much from each other! Make a note of the things you aren´t sure about to ask the teacher.
-Read lots about the topics so that, when it comes to translating, things sound better.
-Borrow grammar books and study guides about the film or book from your college library or ask your teacher, or even, buy them from Amazon. They aren´t expensive and contain the key. Expand your knowledge as much as you can. Don´t rely on the teacher to provide you with all you need to know. Being an independent student is key. But also, be patient if your teacher thinks that some contents come before others. Do lots on your own but be understanding with the pace of the class and the learning process.
-Start practising past papers in February. Before that can be frustrating, in my opinion, unless you take it as a way to learn and not only as a way to see if you are ready.
-Look at all the marked work that is given back to you and solve your doubts with no delay.
-Some web pages like Videoele, EFE practica español, BBC Mundo are great, not only to learn the language but also to know about the culture, current issues and general knowledge. 20 minutos can give you a quick idea of things every day and so useful to tell the examiner: According to some recent news, young people in Spain blah, blah. Expand your knowledge.
-Don´t waste your time. It is a crucial time in your life. Don´t waste it, reduce your unproductive time on social media.
¡Buena suerte!
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Emmacore_
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Thankyou so so so much this was so useful !!!☺️
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Emmacore_
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(Original post by MinaBee)
Don't leave your IRP to the last minute! A lot of people in my class did this and it wasn't pretty. Make sure your two minute speech is fully prepared and come up with practice questions and answers to questions you think the examiner could ask you. Don't be tempted to memorise things word for word though because you'll end up sounding like a parrot and you will lose marks. Remember that your IRP needs to be analytical, not descriptive.

For the card section of the speaking exam, the examiner will be looking to see if you have relevant, cultural knowledge. It's important that you stay up to date with current affairs in Spain and Latin American countries and know about the cultural practices that can be found in the Spanish-speaking world. Also, try and memorise some statistics relating to your sub-topics (e.g if you're doing unemployment, remember that the youth unemployment rate in Spain is 40%).

Quizlet and Memrise are great websites for learning vocabulary. They have a lot of A-level Spanish flashcards sets that you can use or you can make your own. What I found really helpful when I was doing A-level Spanish was to read newspapers online such as El Mundo and La Vanguardia and then make a flashcard set using all the vocabulary I didn't know from the articles.

SpanishPod101 has some great videos on Youtube which you can practice listening with. For the essay exam, do mock essays and get your teacher to check them. Make sure you know a variety of good sentence starters and connectors and that you're able to use advanced grammar structures if you want to get the higher marks. Hodder also does some great revision guides for some of the books and films on the A-level spec so I'd definitely check them out to see if there's one for the book/film you're studying.

Make use of all the past papers, mark schemes, and examiner reports available to you. Practise, practise, practise and make sure that you don't leave anything until the last second. A-level Spanish is not a subject that can be crammed.

Good luck!
Thankyou soooo much, I rlly rlly appreciate you taking the time to write that it’s so useful x
(Original post by SmutsReport)
Live and breathe Spanish. Only watch films and videos in Spanish, go to Spain on every available holiday period, listen to Spanish audio files. Practice vocabulary 2 hours a day, ask your teacher any questions you have, get an extra tutor or join a local Spanish learning group. If you are really motivated and do that you should be approaching a good level in a few months and would need to fine tune your learning with your tutor and teacher after that for specific exams etc.

I never did a Spanish A-level though so don't take my word for it, I learned after when I stayed in Spain for a while. Good luck though !
Thankyou !! The advice was so helpful tho xx
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lunariumxo
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(Original post by Emmacore_)
HELP A GURL OUT- how do you get an A in A level spanish ????
damn your doing A level spanish and yet im here struggling gcse spanish oof
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Quick-use
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(Original post by DeliaMoreno)
Hi Emmacore,
I am a Spanish teacher and, to be honest, I´ve seen an A coming from a non-native student only a few times in 10 years. I don´t want to disappoint you because it is possible but it is tough. If you are ready to do the following things, you´ll be very capable of it:
-Work, work and ... work. Any piece of homework must me done, marked, improved , ...whether it is sentences, paragraphs, essays, .... Ask your teacher for extra support if necessary, extra practice and do it!
-Use a method that suits you to study and remember vocabulary (mind maps, pictures, flashcards...)
-Meet other Spanish students from your class once a week, for example to practice each class topic. You can learn so much from each other! Make a note of the things you aren´t sure about to ask the teacher.
-Read lots about the topics so that, when it comes to translating, things sound better.
-Borrow grammar books and study guides about the film or book from your college library or ask your teacher, or even, buy them from Amazon. They aren´t expensive and contain the key. Expand your knowledge as much as you can. Don´t rely on the teacher to provide you with all you need to know. Being an independent student is key. But also, be patient if your teacher thinks that some contents come before others. Do lots on your own but be understanding with the pace of the class and the learning process.
-Start practising past papers in February. Before that can be frustrating, in my opinion, unless you take it as a way to learn and not only as a way to see if you are ready.
-Look at all the marked work that is given back to you and solve your doubts with no delay.
-Some web pages like Videoele, EFE practica español, BBC Mundo are great, not only to learn the language but also to know about the culture, current issues and general knowledge. 20 minutos can give you a quick idea of things every day and so useful to tell the examiner: According to some recent news, young people in Spain blah, blah. Expand your knowledge.
-Don´t waste your time. It is a crucial time in your life. Don´t waste it, reduce your unproductive time on social media.
¡Buena suerte!
Really? That's a little surprising, admittedly...

Everyone I know got A or A* grades... In fact, I used to get full marks in Spanish and not even the native speakers could get that (because of their somewhat lacking use of academic Spanish language).

At university, the requirement for my degree course was A or above in both French and Spanish and 95% of the students were non-natives. I think it's definitely possible to get an A grade as a non-native in an A level MFL. :rambo:

Emmacore_

My main advice would be - go above and beyond with your Spanish. When you do writing and speaking in Spanish, use extremely complicated language. Don't say that Madrid is beautiful; instead, say it's stunning or breath-taking. Don't say that bull-fighting is bad; say that it's morally repugnant within the context of a contemporary society that's increasingly sensitive toward such issues. Always go above and beyond.

Learn plenty of essay phrases. Instead of por lo tanto for 'therefore', say por ende. Instead of En mi opinión for 'in my opinion', say Según mi criterio. Instead of Además for 'furthermore/moreover', say Por añadidura. Instead of porque for 'because', say ya que / puesto que / dado que / considerando que. Instead of sin embargo for 'however', you can say por el contrario / al contrario / la otra cara de la moneda es que.
Last edited by Quick-use; 4 weeks ago
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DeliaMoreno
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(Original post by Quick-use)
Really? That's a little surprising, admittedly...

Everyone I know got A or A* grades... In fact, I used to get full marks in Spanish and not even the native speakers could get that (because of their somewhat lacking use of academic Spanish language).

At university, the requirement for my degree course was A or above in both French and Spanish and 95% of the students were non-natives. I think it's definitely possible to get an A grade as a non-native in an A level MFL. :rambo:

Emmacore_

My main advice would be - go above and beyond with your Spanish. When you do writing and speaking in Spanish, use extremely complicated language. Don't say that Madrid is beautiful; instead, say it's stunning or breath-taking. Don't say that bull-fighting is bad; say that it's morally repugnant within the context of a contemporary society that's increasingly sensitive toward such issues. Always go above and beyond.

Learn plenty of essay phrases. Instead of por lo tanto for 'therefore', say por ende. Instead of En mi opinión for 'in my opinion', say Según mi criterio. Instead of Además for 'furthermore/moreover', say Por añadidura. Instead of porque for 'because', say ya que / puesto que / dado que / considerando que. Instead of sin embargo for 'however', you can say por el contrario / al contrario / la otra cara de la moneda es que.
Hola,
that is a good advice: go above and beyond. Be an independent learner and do not expect to be spoonfed by your teacher. Some students that got good grades at GCSE, rest on their laurels when they get to A Level. Constant work is key.
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