Pany5689
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Hi, please could someone explain the differences between these, I always thought a solicitor and lawyer was 2 different jobs but apparently they are the exact same?

What is the average salary for the 3 (preferably in north england)? Which is the best to be? How long does it take to become each of these? Is a law degree worth it? What qualifications do I need, e.g A levels or just a degree? Thank you
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J Papi
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Solicitors and barristers are both lawyers.

There are massive differences in salary depending on where you practice, how many years qualified you are, etc. As a newly qualified 'lawyer, you could get anything from 20k as a solicitor in a legal aid firm in Wigan to 150k as a barrister practicing commercial law in London.

You really need to do more research into what each side of the profession does and whether it appeals to you. There are plenty of careers sites out there for guidance - e.g. https://www.thelawyerportal.com/free...and-barrister/. Google is your friend.

Ideally, you need A-levels, a 2.1 degree from a decent uni in any discipline, and the ability to pass the SQE if you want to become a solicitor or do well in the GDL + BPTC if you want to become a barrister.
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mnot
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Hi, please could someone explain the differences between these, I always thought a solicitor and lawyer was 2 different jobs but apparently they are the exact same?

What is the average salary for the 3 (preferably in north england)? Which is the best to be? How long does it take to become each of these? Is a law degree worth it? What qualifications do I need, e.g A levels or just a degree? Thank you
Law is a field rather than a job: people who qualify as a lawyer either become a barrister (these work in a 'inn' and are the people you see in court) or solicitor does legal work in an office, they can be working on contracts, advisory, transactions, almost anything to do with the law but not enforcing litigation (the bit in court) (although they can be involved in prep for litigation).

To make things more confusing: some companies hire lawyers to not be either of these things for a number of different corporate in-house positions (although normally these people are qualified solicitors)

You also get other more niche attorneys who work on other legal roles: for example a patent attorney, these people work on drafting, and submitting patents, then theirs trade mark attorneys etc.

Bottom line is their are a bunch of different types of lawyers for different activities: but a barrasiter is NOT allowed to act a patent attorney nor can a solicitor do what a trade mark attorney does. Every type of lawyer has a unique training program and has a specific purpose. For example in the Aero industry a pilot wouldn't do maintenance on the aircraft, a mechanic would, same industry different jobs its like that with law.
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Pany5689
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(Original post by mnot)
Law is a field rather than a job: people who qualify as a lawyer either become a barrister (these work in a 'inn' and are the people you see in court) or solicitor does legal work in an office, they can be working on contracts, advisory, transactions, almost anything to do with the law but not enforcing litigation (the bit in court) (although they can be involved in prep for litigation).

To make things more confusing: some companies hire lawyers to not be either of these things for a number of different corporate in-house positions (although normally these people are qualified solicitors)

You also get other more niche attorneys who work on other legal roles: for example a patent attorney, these people work on drafting, and submitting patents, then theirs trade mark attorneys etc.

Bottom line is their are a bunch of different types of lawyers for different activities: but a barrasiter is NOT allowed to act a patent attorney nor can a solicitor do what a trade mark attorney does. Every type of lawyer has a unique training program and has a specific purpose. For example in the Aero industry a pilot wouldn't do maintenance on the aircraft, a mechanic would, same industry different jobs its like that with law.
Thank you for clearing that up! So is the term “lawyer” not actually a job itself? Would you say it’s better to be a barrister or solicitor? Do you know which one is the better salary? What’s the llb?
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OR321
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This is irrelevant asf but I always used to mix up a Barrister and a Barista.
Sorry
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by OR321)
This is irrelevant asf but I always used to mix up a Barrister and a Barista.
Sorry
to be fair, both jobs are roughly as interesting as each other
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harrysbar
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The word "lawyer" is a general term so people who know what they are talking about would be more likely to talk about wanting to become a solicitor or a barrister, since they are quite different jobs.
The LLB is a Law degree.


As to which one is better, it us up to you to decide which one suits you better Pany5689

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/solicitor

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/barrister
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Pany5689
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(Original post by harrysbar)
The word "lawyer" is a general term so people who know what they are talking about would be more likely to talk about wanting to become a solicitor or a barrister, since they are quite different jobs.
The LLB is a Law degree.


As to which one is better, it us up to you to decide which one suits you better Pany5689

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/solicitor

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/barrister
Hi, thank you for clearing that up! I just see people on the TV sometimes where it says underneath their name that they're a lawyer so I always thought they were 3 separate jobs. Thank you for the links I will have a look now! Choosing a career is hard ahahaha
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Hi, thank you for clearing that up! I just see people on the TV sometimes where it says underneath their name that they're a lawyer so I always thought they were 3 separate jobs. Thank you for the links I will have a look now! Choosing a career is hard ahahaha
I think people use the term "lawyer" more in America :holmes:
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mnot
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Thank you for clearing that up! So is the term “lawyer” not actually a job itself? Would you say it’s better to be a barrister or solicitor? Do you know which one is the better salary? What’s the llb?
A 'lawyer' is a job, but its someone who practices law for a career, but they could do a variety of things.

Its not better to be one or the other, their just different things, the top end of both make exceptional amounts and the bottom end struggle (as with almost anything). There are probably less top barristers than solicesters but that's just the nature of the work. ie the magic circle firms + top US firms outnumber the total people in the big Inns (ie Greys Inn, Lincolns Inn etc). I would say if you are looking to select one, searching on TSR is not the right place.

If you are in yr12 now (or similar) looking for a career, I really recommend doing a very detailed search of what the job is like, working in a top firm or in a big corporate law role the career is very demanding (long hours, including weekends, holidays etc) lots of tedious paperwork, the people who who do well have an exceptional drive & motivation, and passion for the industry, without this dealing with it is impossible.
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Pany5689
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(Original post by mnot)
A 'lawyer' is a job, but its someone who practices law for a career, but they could do a variety of things.

Its not better to be one or the other, their just different things, the top end of both make exceptional amounts and the bottom end struggle (as with almost anything). There are probably less top barristers than solicesters but that's just the nature of the work. ie the magic circle firms + top US firms outnumber the total people in the big Inns (ie Greys Inn, Lincolns Inn etc). I would say if you are looking to select one, searching on TSR is not the right place.

If you are in yr12 now (or similar) looking for a career, I really recommend doing a very detailed search of what the job is like, working in a top firm or in a big corporate law role the career is very demanding (long hours, including weekends, holidays etc) lots of tedious paperwork, the people who who do well have an exceptional drive & motivation, and passion for the industry, without this dealing with it is impossible.
Hi, thank you very much for this! By the bottom end do you mean people who have just recently qualified? Yeah I know that it probably isn't I just come to get advice as google tells me all sorts of different things! Yeah I'm currently in year 13, I'm sure it is, I do have strong motivation and dedication! Well it's either going to be a law or medicine degree ahahaha
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J Papi
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(Original post by Pany5689)
Hi, thank you very much for this! By the bottom end do you mean people who have just recently qualified? Yeah I know that it probably isn't I just come to get advice as google tells me all sorts of different things! Yeah I'm currently in year 13, I'm sure it is, I do have strong motivation and dedication! Well it's either going to be a law or medicine degree ahahaha
'Bottom end' is used by the user as shorthand for 'less lucrative specialisation'

Generally, commercial law practitioners (whether they are solicitors or barristers) will earn more than, say, family law practitioners, who in turn will make more than, say, criminal law practitioners
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J Papi
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(Original post by mnot)
A 'lawyer' is a job, but its someone who practices law for a career, but they could do a variety of things.

Its not better to be one or the other, their just different things, the top end of both make exceptional amounts and the bottom end struggle (as with almost anything). There are probably less top barristers than solicesters but that's just the nature of the work. ie the magic circle firms + top US firms outnumber the total people in the big Inns (ie Greys Inn, Lincolns Inn etc). I would say if you are looking to select one, searching on TSR is not the right place.

If you are in yr12 now (or similar) looking for a career, I really recommend doing a very detailed search of what the job is like, working in a top firm or in a big corporate law role the career is very demanding (long hours, including weekends, holidays etc) lots of tedious paperwork, the people who who do well have an exceptional drive & motivation, and passion for the industry, without this dealing with it is impossible.
The equivalent of a law firm at the Bar isn't an Inn of Court, it's chambers

I'd guess that there's a higher proportion of high earners at the Bar, not least because there are so damn many solicitor gimps doing unprofitable work in the regions
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calm and cool
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isn't lawyer just a blanket term for the above two lmaoo
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Assembly
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https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/wh...you-want-to-be

A nice overview of the similarities/differences between the Solicitor and Barrister profession (both are lawyers)
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Notoriety
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Solicitors and barristers are both lawyers.

There are massive differences in salary depending on where you practice, how many years qualified you are, etc. As a newly qualified 'lawyer, you could get anything from 20k as a solicitor in a legal aid firm in Wigan to 150k as a barrister practicing commercial law in London.

You really need to do more research into what each side of the profession does and whether it appeals to you. There are plenty of careers sites out there for guidance - e.g. https://www.thelawyerportal.com/free...and-barrister/. Google is your friend.

Ideally, you need A-levels, a 2.1 degree from a decent uni in any discipline, and the ability to pass the SQE if you want to become a solicitor or do well in the GDL + BPTC if you want to become a barrister.
CILEx lot are called lawyers too I believe. Don't know about conveyancers and notaries.
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J Papi
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(Original post by Notoriety)
CILEx lot are called lawyers too I believe. Don't know about conveyancers and notaries.
Low end sols the lot of them
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Assembly)
https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/wh...you-want-to-be

A nice overview of the similarities/differences between the Solicitor and Barrister profession (both are lawyers)
Saw the chambers link, got angry, and then realised I didn't need to punch any doors.
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17Student17
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First of all look at your likely A level grades. You will probably need high A level grades - ideally As (and good GCSEs) and then a good degree. Decide if realistically that is possible for you. If so yo udon't have to choose whether to be a barrister or solicitor until during your law degree and in fact you can read a different subject at university rather than law if you prefer although it would then take you an extra year to qualify.

On pay one big firm in the NE Ward H pays trainee solicitors £24k (you would get almost double that in London) https://www.lawcareers.net/Solicitors/Ward-Hadaway and then when they qualify about £36k http://www.lex100.com/index.php/the-...-will-you-earn (and even up to £100k when you qualify in London).
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mnot
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I think people use the term "lawyer" more in America :holmes:
This also makes more sense, as in the states a qualified barrister & solicitor just have to pass the bar, and then they can do either; (whilst they would almost certainly pick one) the qualifying exam is the same for both over there, unlike in the UK.
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