Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
ngl I want to be quite well off. On top of this I like science and it sounds like an interesting job and a few specialities appeal to me. I wouldn't want to work in a stressful 1 like A&E though. Should I do medicine? I also want to live my life and not die thinking wow I never spent any time with family or frineds just worked all the time
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
The Chinese medicine market is booming and with the arrival of Brexit and lack of access to medication you can make good money off bootleg tigerbalm.
1
reply
BlueIndigoViolet
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
lmao then why are you doing medicine?
0
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
ngl I want to be quite well off. On top of this I like science and it sounds like an interesting job and a few specialities appeal to me. I wouldn't want to work in a stressful 1 like A&E though. Should I do medicine? I also want to live my life and not die thinking wow I never spent any time with family or frineds just worked all the time

Medicine is well paid (once you're a consultant) but it's not going to make you a millionaire with the associated lifestyle (if that's what you mean by rich).

It goes without saying that it's a hard job and the training is difficult, so there are certainly easier ways of making a comparable salary. I wouldn't go into medicine with money as the primary reason.
0
reply
Big D Convict
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
If you really wanna make money you gotta know that qualifications and whatnot is not the be all and end all, you are just learning how to make someone else rich.

You need to learn useful skills for yourself like how to day trade and that isn't taught on any university campus so you you gotta master the basics of that and start making money for yourself ygm
0
reply
greenapples2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
well the lack of social life means you'll save money
3
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by mpaprika)
well the lack of social life means you'll save money
I can't recall how many times have I saved money buying rounds by saying "oops the hospital's paging me" :rofl:
1
reply
Anonymous #3
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
Noooooo!!
If you're main goal in life is to get rich don't choose medicine. You wont get paid well for the work you do for decades and you will probably just end up hating work, since you spend so much time there.
Choose investment banking or real estate, where going home at 5 means as such.
1
reply
Anonymous #4
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
you don’t get to choose your specialty rotations not until a couple years down the line, I think everyone has to do an A&E placement anyway
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#10
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Democracy)
Medicine is well paid (once you're a consultant) but it's not going to make you a millionaire with the associated lifestyle (if that's what you mean by rich).

It goes without saying that it's a hard job and the training is difficult, so there are certainly easier ways of making a comparable salary. I wouldn't go into medicine with money as the primary reason.
Not the main reason. 40% good pay and stable. 40% interested in the degree. 20% rewarding would be my breakdown. Also it does pay well and is guaranteed to pay well. Also the fact you can easily take career breaks and travel also appeals to me. I don't want to be rich RICH but just not worry about money, afford holidays, afford meals out. Saw a chart that showed 3 years after graduating it is considerable higher than most other degrees.

At the same time though there's no point being rich if you have no time to spend or enjoy your money or have MH issues from the stress. So I want a balance and am not sure what to do.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
Noooooo!!
If you're main goal in life is to get rich don't choose medicine. You wont get paid well for the work you do for decades and you will probably just end up hating work, since you spend so much time there.
Choose investment banking or real estate, where going home at 5 means as such.
not what I've heard about IB. They work long hours too.
0
reply
tuesday1234
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Anonymous)
Noooooo!!
If you're main goal in life is to get rich don't choose medicine. You wont get paid well for the work you do for decades and you will probably just end up hating work, since you spend so much time there.
Choose investment banking or real estate, where going home at 5 means as such.
investment bankers don't go home at 5pm LMAO
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#13
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by ecolier)
I can't recall how many times have I saved money buying rounds by saying "oops the hospital's paging me" :rofl:
does ur social life suffer in med more than in other careers
0
reply
tuesday1234
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by Anonymous)
not what I've heard about IB. They work long hours too.
its harder to get into IB and the hours are very long.
0
reply
Anonymous #5
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
You don't become a doctor for the money.
1) You become a doctor for the pure satisfaction you get from saving a person's life; nobody who is a doctor right now became a doctor for the money involved but for that satisfaction.
2) You can become a GP if you want to balance spending time with family and your work.
3) If you enter medicine wanting money you will be punished heavily: you will find writing a personal statement hard, you will not have much to say at your interview and most of all some uni or the other will pick up that you do not have a genuine interest into what a doctor does but for the money involved.

This may sound harsh but it is the reality.
0
reply
username4750946
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by tuesday1234)
doctors don't get paid much lmao
Depends on how much you work and if you decide to do extra shifts apart from your normal shifts.
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
you don’t get to choose your specialty rotations not until a couple years down the line, I think everyone has to do an A&E placement anyway
The second part is not really true. In the foundation programme (which is what I think you're referring to) it's compulsory to do an internal medicine job, and a surgical job; but A&E isn't. Read https://www.foundationprogramme.nhs....tion-programme for more information; even their example didn't include an A&E rotation.

However, if you did do an A&E rotation for 4 months (usually random, or people choose the job because it has A&E in it) then you could locum in A&E after FY2. In some areas in demand a post-FY2 doctor working in A&E can earn up to £60 per hour or more - netting the doctor > £100,000 just by working 9-5 Monday to Friday with lots of weeks / months to spare too.

The downside of locuming is that you are not on the training ladder.

Your first part is right though, so even if you wanted to do GP (famous for it's "good" work-life balance, even though most GPs work 8am - 6pm at least on most days; and as late as 8:30pm on the late evenings) you would still have to "endure" at least 2 years (possibly 4) of general hospital medicine!
(Original post by Anonymous)
does ur social life suffer in med more than in other careers
No, but then I am in an amazing specialty!
Last edited by ecolier; 1 year ago
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#18
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by Anonymous)
You don't become a doctor for the money.
1) You become a doctor for the pure satisfaction you get from saving a person's life; nobody who is a doctor right now became a doctor for the money involved but for that satisfaction.
2) You can become a GP if you want to balance spending time with family and your work.
3) If you enter medicine wanting money you will be punished heavily: you will find writing a personal statement hard, you will not have much to say at your interview and most of all some uni or the other will pick up that you do not have a genuine interest into what a doctor does but for the money involved.

This may sound harsh but it is the reality.
1) I'm sure some of them did. Yes I would find that satisfying but also stressful if they die.
2) still long hours but yes
3) I have already written my PS and have done a lot of volunteering so don't think it will be a problem.
0
reply
Anonymous #5
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by Anonymous)
1) I'm sure some of them did. Yes I would find that satisfying but also stressful if they die.
2) still long hours but yes
3) I have already written my PS and have done a lot of volunteering so don't think it will be a problem.
Good luck
Because you will be hella sure needing it.
0
reply
asif007
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
It’s clear that money is your primary motivation and you want a comfortable life without stress or responsibility. Don’t do Medicine and instead focus on something else that will help you earn the same, if not more than a doctor in half the time it takes to become one. I suggest you look at Economics/Finance/Accountancy and go into a corporate job.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you haven't confirmed your firm and insurance choices yet, why is that?

I don't want to decide until I've received all my offers (7)
50%
I am waiting until the deadline in case anything in my life changes (2)
14.29%
I am waiting until the deadline in case something in the world changes (ie. pandemic-related) (1)
7.14%
I am waiting until I can see the unis in person (0)
0%
I still have more questions before I made my decision (2)
14.29%
No reason, just haven't entered it yet (1)
7.14%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (1)
7.14%

Watched Threads

View All