hollyrbean
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Hi,

I’m currently in year 13 studying French, English Literature and Classical Civilisation, and am predicted AAA (as well as an A* in my EPQ). I will hopefully be starting university September 2020. I am interested in studying either BA classics of BA classical civilisation/classical studies. The universities that I am considering for my shortlist are Durham, Exeter, Nottingham, Birmingham, Warwick and Leeds. I am aware that for most classics degrees, either Greek or Latin is required at A level, however at Nottingham and Birmingham, this is not the case and providing I got the entry requirement grades, I would be able to get in with my A level subjects. I am considering choosing classics as from what I’ve heard, a degree in classics is much more ‘well thought of’ than classical civilisation or classical studies. I do enjoy studying languages, having achieved a grade 8 in GCSE French and German, and then continuing my French to A level. However, I fear that I will struggle compared to the other students on the classics course who would have most likely done at least Latin A level, if not some Greek as well, as the lectures told me that it was quite rare for people in my position to apply for straight classics. My post-degree plans are possibly going into teaching, into research, or possibly even doing a law conversion course. I am aware that the teaching of Ancient Greek in schools is dying out, however most people have told me that to be a teacher of classical civilisation or classics, I would most likely need to know a good amount of Latin and to possibly be able to teach that as well as civilisation. I am however aware that it is possible to choose beginners Latin modules within most classical civilisation modules. Please could anyone with any knowledge shine a light on any aspect that I have mentioned, whether this is the respectability of the two degrees, the likelihood that I would struggle with my little experience in ancient languages, or even any guidance in general? Thank you in advance!
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Lizzillo
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I have no idea which is more well thought of, but why not learn some Latin now? There are plenty of textbooksand activity books available, and if you are decent at languages ready you should be able to pick up the basics pretty easily! Plus, if you already study Ckassical Civilisation at college/sixth form, I bet your teacher knows Latin and might be willing to help you or give you an after school lesson, that's what mine did. As for teaching after, if you type in Classics teaching jobs, they all require Latin. Take the degree that interests you most, but if you want to teach classics, you will more than likely need Latin, so you can either try and learn it now or take modules at university.
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Quick-use
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(Original post by hollyrbean)
Hi,

I’m currently in year 13 studying French, English Literature and Classical Civilisation, and am predicted AAA (as well as an A* in my EPQ). I will hopefully be starting university September 2020. I am interested in studying either BA classics of BA classical civilisation/classical studies. The universities that I am considering for my shortlist are Durham, Exeter, Nottingham, Birmingham, Warwick and Leeds. I am aware that for most classics degrees, either Greek or Latin is required at A level, however at Nottingham and Birmingham, this is not the case and providing I got the entry requirement grades, I would be able to get in with my A level subjects. I am considering choosing classics as from what I’ve heard, a degree in classics is much more ‘well thought of’ than classical civilisation or classical studies. I do enjoy studying languages, having achieved a grade 8 in GCSE French and German, and then continuing my French to A level. However, I fear that I will struggle compared to the other students on the classics course who would have most likely done at least Latin A level, if not some Greek as well, as the lectures told me that it was quite rare for people in my position to apply for straight classics. My post-degree plans are possibly going into teaching, into research, or possibly even doing a law conversion course. I am aware that the teaching of Ancient Greek in schools is dying out, however most people have told me that to be a teacher of classical civilisation or classics, I would most likely need to know a good amount of Latin and to possibly be able to teach that as well as civilisation. I am however aware that it is possible to choose beginners Latin modules within most classical civilisation modules. Please could anyone with any knowledge shine a light on any aspect that I have mentioned, whether this is the respectability of the two degrees, the likelihood that I would struggle with my little experience in ancient languages, or even any guidance in general? Thank you in advance!
Have you considered the University of Edinburgh? You could do a Classics degree and they let you take both languages from beginner level. https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/underg...amme&code=Q800 :rambo:
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hollyrbean
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(Original post by Lizzillo)
I have no idea which is more well thought of, but why not learn some Latin now? There are plenty of textbooksand activity books available, and if you are decent at languages ready you should be able to pick up the basics pretty easily! Plus, if you already study Ckassical Civilisation at college/sixth form, I bet your teacher knows Latin and might be willing to help you or give you an after school lesson, that's what mine did. As for teaching after, if you type in Classics teaching jobs, they all require Latin. Take the degree that interests you most, but if you want to teach classics, you will more than likely need Latin, so you can either try and learn it now or take modules at university.
Thank you, that is a very good idea, my Classical Civilisation teacher only teaches up to year 9 Latin I think, but there is also a Latin and Greek teacher at my school so I might go and ask her if she could give me some pointers! Or I might also try to learn some online or on an app. Okay that’s interesting, thank you! So do you/did you study classics at university?
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hollyrbean
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(Original post by Quick-use)
Have you considered the University of Edinburgh? You could do a Classics degree and they let you take both languages from beginner level. https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/underg...amme&code=Q800 :rambo:
Ooh that’s interesting, thanks for bringing that to my attention. I didn’t actually consider Edinburgh before, as I live in South East England so it would be a trek for me to get there and back for the holidays or family emergencies etc as I would have to go by plane! I will have a look into it though as it sounds promising, thank you!
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Lizzillo
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(Original post by hollyrbean)
Thank you, that is a very good idea, my Classical Civilisation teacher only teaches up to year 9 Latin I think, but there is also a Latin and Greek teacher at my school so I might go and ask her if she could give me some pointers! Or I might also try to learn some online or on an app. Okay that’s interesting, thank you! So do you/did you study classics at university?
Year 9 Latin is a great start though, you need to know the basics first anyway. In fact, if you can use their textbooks that would be ideal really! There's a few apps, but I haven't used them to know if they are decent, but as you know other languages you'll find a lot of words stem from Latin originally so it's easy to see links and pick it up. I study Ancient History and History, but I did Latin in school and do some modules at university in it as I can't decide if I would rather teach classics or history so I'm keeping both doors open for as long as possible. I decided against classics as a degree because my interest, while primarily interest is based upon ancient Greece and their mythology, I love other periods too, like medieval, and I found classics/classical civ boxed me in too much, plus a lot of module choices went on a language as opposed to an interest. It's personal preference though, so pick the degree you like the modules of, not the one that sounds best.
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Edminzodo
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(Original post by hollyrbean)
Hi,

I’m currently in year 13 studying French, English Literature and Classical Civilisation, and am predicted AAA (as well as an A* in my EPQ). I will hopefully be starting university September 2020. I am interested in studying either BA classics of BA classical civilisation/classical studies. The universities that I am considering for my shortlist are Durham, Exeter, Nottingham, Birmingham, Warwick and Leeds. I am aware that for most classics degrees, either Greek or Latin is required at A level, however at Nottingham and Birmingham, this is not the case and providing I got the entry requirement grades, I would be able to get in with my A level subjects. I am considering choosing classics as from what I’ve heard, a degree in classics is much more ‘well thought of’ than classical civilisation or classical studies. I do enjoy studying languages, having achieved a grade 8 in GCSE French and German, and then continuing my French to A level. However, I fear that I will struggle compared to the other students on the classics course who would have most likely done at least Latin A level, if not some Greek as well, as the lectures told me that it was quite rare for people in my position to apply for straight classics. My post-degree plans are possibly going into teaching, into research, or possibly even doing a law conversion course. I am aware that the teaching of Ancient Greek in schools is dying out, however most people have told me that to be a teacher of classical civilisation or classics, I would most likely need to know a good amount of Latin and to possibly be able to teach that as well as civilisation. I am however aware that it is possible to choose beginners Latin modules within most classical civilisation modules. Please could anyone with any knowledge shine a light on any aspect that I have mentioned, whether this is the respectability of the two degrees, the likelihood that I would struggle with my little experience in ancient languages, or even any guidance in general? Thank you in advance!
So I did my undergraduate at Liverpool, and they had 6 (I think) language levels of Latin and Greek so you could enter at any point (i.e. with no experience all the way to A-Level) and there would be a class suited to your ability.

I did a degree in Egyptology which was 50% hieroglyphs, which is fairly similar to studying Classics, with the added pictorial element. I'd done a modern language to AS and Latin to GCSE, and to be honest, a general understanding of language and grammar is what you need for Latin. You can do it intensively (I know someone who did it at KCL) and get up to a really high standard in 3 years. I actually did Egyptology with the intention of becoming a lawyer and then changed my mind.

In our final year hieroglyphs class, only 1 person had done languages at A-Level, and the difference didn't show.

If you need any more advice, feel free to drop me a PM. Have a look at KCL and Liverpool, too!
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harrysbar
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(Original post by hollyrbean)
Hi,

I’m currently in year 13 studying French, English Literature and Classical Civilisation, and am predicted AAA (as well as an A* in my EPQ). I will hopefully be starting university September 2020. I am interested in studying either BA classics of BA classical civilisation/classical studies. The universities that I am considering for my shortlist are Durham, Exeter, Nottingham, Birmingham, Warwick and Leeds. I am aware that for most classics degrees, either Greek or Latin is required at A level, however at Nottingham and Birmingham, this is not the case and providing I got the entry requirement grades, I would be able to get in with my A level subjects. I am considering choosing classics as from what I’ve heard, a degree in classics is much more ‘well thought of’ than classical civilisation or classical studies. I do enjoy studying languages, having achieved a grade 8 in GCSE French and German, and then continuing my French to A level. However, I fear that I will struggle compared to the other students on the classics course who would have most likely done at least Latin A level, if not some Greek as well, as the lectures told me that it was quite rare for people in my position to apply for straight classics. My post-degree plans are possibly going into teaching, into research, or possibly even doing a law conversion course. I am aware that the teaching of Ancient Greek in schools is dying out, however most people have told me that to be a teacher of classical civilisation or classics, I would most likely need to know a good amount of Latin and to possibly be able to teach that as well as civilisation. I am however aware that it is possible to choose beginners Latin modules within most classical civilisation modules. Please could anyone with any knowledge shine a light on any aspect that I have mentioned, whether this is the respectability of the two degrees, the likelihood that I would struggle with my little experience in ancient languages, or even any guidance in general? Thank you in advance!
With the teaching idea in mind, did you know that it would open up a lot more opportunities if 50% of your degree was in a National Curriculum subject like History? Ancient History is ok and you don't need History A level to get onto the course at most places).

Lots of unis do combined courses in Classics with other things, this is an example from Exeter

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergradua...rees/classics/

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/teachertrai...ry/history/#a3
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