I’m interested in studying Law abroad to save money? Watch

TarikAtakan
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#1
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Where offers the course in English for a reasonable cost. Is Germany possible
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J Papi
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Never heard of an overseas provider teaching English law

Not that I'd want to study there :ashamed2:

Notoriety?
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Never heard of an overseas provider teaching English law

Not that I'd want to study there :ashamed2:

Notoriety?
Trust me you would when you hear that most European countries offer free university for E.U. students (If Brexit doesn’t happen) and get its degrees accepted in the UK.
And there is nothing wrong with the standard of German unis either it’s not exactly Rwanda.
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J Papi
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
Trust me you would when you hear that most European countries offer free university for E.U. students (If Brexit doesn’t happen) and get its degrees accepted in the UK.
And there is nothing wrong with the standard of German unis either it’s not exactly Rwanda.
I'm an EU student myself (a proper, continental, one), and I know a lot more about what European universities offer and don't offer than a 17-year-old who lives in the UK.

All countries' non-law university degrees can be 'accepted' in the UK. Unless you're entering a regulated profession (such as law or medicine), the value of your degree is for your future employer to assess. The EU has nothing to do with it.

All state-run universities in other countries teach their own jurisdiction's law. If English law is taught somewhere, chances are that it's taught by a private college that is licensed by, and gets its teaching material from, a bottom-feeding institution in the UK (in my country, these tend to be the likes of Derby, Sunderland, London Met, etc.). In some countries, institutions like these are either illegal or extremely unpopular, so they don't exist.

I did briefly consider studying in Germany, but the prospects of having little academic selectivity at the age of 18, overcrowded lectures, lengthy degrees and next-to-no international 'brand' put me off. And I'm sure that Rwanda has a fine education system - it's often held up as a beacon of hope and progress in its region!
Last edited by J Papi; 4 weeks ago
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
I'm an EU student myself (a proper, continental, one), and I know a lot more about what European universities offer and don't offer than a 17-year-old who lives in the UK.

All countries' non-law university degrees can be 'accepted' in the UK. Unless you're entering a regulated profession (such as law or medicine), the value of your degree is for your future employer to assess. The EU has nothing to do with it.

All state-run universities in other countries teach their own jurisdiction's law. If English law is taught somewhere, chances are that it's taught by a private college that is licensed by, and gets its teaching material from, a bottom-feeding institution in the UK (in my country, these tend to be the likes of Derby, Sunderland, London Met, etc.). In some countries, institutions like these are either illegal or extremely unpopular, so they don't exist.

I did briefly consider studying in Germany, but the prospects of having little academic selectivity at the age of 18, overcrowded lectures, lengthy degrees and next-to-no international 'brand' put me off. And I'm sure that Rwanda has a fine education system - it's often held up as a beacon of hope and progress in its region!
So for law are you saying that I will have to study in the uk and if not where is the best country?
Lastly I’m a first year A level student who is barely 16 not a 17 year old.
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J Papi
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
So for law are you saying that I will have to study in the uk and if not where is the best country?
Lastly I’m a first year A level student who is barely 16 not a 17 year old.
If you want to study law as undergraduate, UK.

If not, the world's your oyster, and your choice will probably be influenced by cost of living, language and family ties as much as anything.
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
If you want to study law as undergraduate, UK.

If not, the world's your oyster, and your choice will probably be influenced by cost of living, language and family ties as much as anything.
It’s a shame as the UK is one of the most expensive places in Europe for uni prices and full of bottom feeding institutions with student accommodation being strategically overpriced.
Does also speaking welsh and being of Turkish descent change anything and I’m far from rich as well.
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J Papi
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
Does also speaking welsh and being of Turkish descent change anything and I’m far from rich as well.
Why would it change anything?
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Why would it change anything?
I was curious if unis in Wales offered welsh courses or if I could study in turkey or something.
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J Papi
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
I was curious if unis in Wales offered welsh courses or if I could study in turkey or something.
Not familiar with Turkish unis

English law degrees are taught in English.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
I was curious if unis in Wales offered welsh courses or if I could study in turkey or something.
Cardiff uni offer Law and Welsh (others in Wales probably do too) but that doesn't help financially since the tuition fees are the same Although they do accept the Welsh Bacc in lieu of one A level grade so that helps academically if you're a Welsh student. This is taken from their website: "The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects"

https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/unde...-and-welsh-llb
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999tigger
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
I was curious if unis in Wales offered welsh courses or if I could study in turkey or something.
Are you a UK citizen?
Do you have unlimited leave to remain?
Why do you want to study Turkish Law? Do you want to be a Turkish lawyer?
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Not familiar with Turkish unis

English law degrees are taught in English.
Does Ireland qualify as a valid country due to their similarities as they weren’t independent until 100 years ago and their first language is English too.
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Are you a UK citizen?
Do you have unlimited leave to remain?
Why do you want to study Turkish Law? Do you want to be a Turkish lawyer?
Yes I was born in the uk to one British parent.
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cheerIeader
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You won't be able to practice in the UK.
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TarikAtakan
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#16
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Cardiff uni offer Law and Welsh (others in Wales probably do too) but that doesn't help financially since the tuition fees are the same Although they do accept the Welsh Bacc in lieu of one A level grade so that helps academically if you're a Welsh student. This is taken from their website: "The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects"

https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2020/law-and-welsh-
Do they accept on basis of UCAS points to make 4 A levels with lower requirements.
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Aspenfire
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Try Bucerius Law School Hamburg or Jacobs University Bremen, both in Germany, both teach in English
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harrysbar
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(Original post by TarikAtakan)
Do they accept on basis of UCAS points to make 4 A levels with lower requirements.
In common with other competitive unis, Cardiff would prefer 3 good A levels than 4 weaker grades with the same points score.

UCAS points are used more often by the newer or less competitive unis like Bangor.
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TarikAtakan
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(Original post by Aspenfire)
Try Bucerius Law School Hamburg or Jacobs University Bremen, both in Germany, both teach in English
Johan said it’s not valid as it’s German law but if it’s accepted in the UK you’ve saved me.
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999tigger
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#20
(Original post by TarikAtakan)
Johan said it’s not valid as it’s German law but if it’s accepted in the UK you’ve saved me.
Why do you want to learn German Law? I thought you wanted to learn Turkish Law?

I like the idea of you being saved. Are you paying your own fees?
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