alexxhales
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So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?
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ElephantMemory
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It's all pseudo science with no real career prospects. When you meet a psychologist or receive treatment from a psychologist, you quickly learn they are all just blagging it and have no clue what they are talking about.
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stress11
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If you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Psychology has if you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Doing psychology shows a multitude of different skills from evaluation skills to applying your knowledge, it’s scientific based, it’s maths space but the good thing is it’s not at the highest level and is definitely doable. The only thing is, Psychology is obviously based highly on labwork and research methods if you are so scream-ish to the point you can’t do this then I don’t suggest doing psychology
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ElephantMemory
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(Original post by ElephantMemory)
It's all pseudo science with no real career prospects. When you meet a psychologist or receive treatment from a psychologist, you quickly learn they are all just blagging it and have no clue what they are talking about.
If you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Psychology has if you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Doing psychology shows a multitude of different skills from evaluation skills to applying your knowledge, it’s scientific based, it’s maths space but the good thing is it’s not at the highest level and is definitely doable. The only thing is, Psychology is obviously based highly on labwork and research methods if you are so scream-ish to the point you can’t do this then I don’t suggest doing psychology
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by alexxhales)
So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?

Psychology is a science, you will not learn much about how to better understand others or become stronger, that's more wishy washy self-help *******s not psychology degree.
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TheOnlyIzzy
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(Original post by alexxhales)
So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?
Psychology can have good career prospects in anything ranging from marketing to psychiatric hospitals, however because so many people take the Bsc degree (bachelors) it’s almost useless at that level. You will have to take an Msci (intergrated masters) or MSc (masters) to stand a solid chance
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by alexxhales)
So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?
Psychology is for snake oil salesmen. No jobs at the end of it and just a load of weird theories stuck in your head.
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marinade
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(Original post by alexxhales)
My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

Thoughts on this?
Although not my personal view, the reason you want to study psychology is very common among other people and ultimately why so many people study it. However you may be unsatisfied at the end of it. I say this simply out of experience of talking to a lot of graduates who want to go into mental health and from personal interest and they don't find out quite as many answers as you want.

If you want to understand yourselves and others better then I would suggest you do psychology if you want, but volunteer in a variety of settings which will broaden your perspective of life and start to answer the questions you have.

I read the squeamish comment as code for you have anxiety. If this is the case there will be plenty of other people on the course in the same boat. I would have a word with the admissions tutor about what lab work is involved.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by alexxhales)
So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?
Psychology is a social science, not a science. That nuance essentially means you should have some appreciation of the scientific method and using statistics but you will only do so in a very practical way to work on social theories.

Also, if you don't like research, don't go to university at all!
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wishiddonelit
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So I'm about to enter my final term of psychology, and I wish I had asked these questions before I did.I nearly went for English lit, and I wish now that I had. I too don't have an aptitude for science, but did well at psych A-level (as it is more theoretical with only knowledge of research methods rather than application).'My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.'- I think a lot of people (including myself) study psych for this reason but can easily become jaded (as I have) at how different academic psych is in reality. Aside from some theory, it is mainly research methods, and it is very impersonal. It includes a lot of statistics and badgering people to take surveys.Obviously there will be social and even cognitive aspects which may interest you on a personal level - but if you are like me and do not enjoy research and reports (though I haven't actually done any lab studies and there is no squeamish stuff involved), you might want to reconsider.That being said, I've still done well - just begrudgingly. And you could also consider what you would want to do with psychology. Personally it's driven me away from a career in psychology. From what you've described, you might consider a degree in psychotherapy / counselling / social / developmental psychology more?Hope that helps.I made this account as I felt compelled to reply to you, hence the username.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by wishiddonelit)
So I'm about to enter my final term of psychology, and I wish I had asked these questions before I did.I nearly went for English lit, and I wish now that I had. I too don't have an aptitude for science, but did well at psych A-level (as it is more theoretical with only knowledge of research methods rather than application).'My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.'- I think a lot of people (including myself) study psych for this reason but can easily become jaded (as I have) at how different academic psych is in reality. Aside from some theory, it is mainly research methods, and it is very impersonal. It includes a lot of statistics and badgering people to take surveys.Obviously there will be social and even cognitive aspects which may interest you on a personal level - but if you are like me and do not enjoy research and reports (though I haven't actually done any lab studies and there is no squeamish stuff involved), you might want to reconsider.That being said, I've still done well - just begrudgingly. And you could also consider what you would want to do with psychology. Personally it's driven me away from a career in psychology. From what you've described, you might consider a degree in psychotherapy / counselling / social / developmental psychology more?Hope that helps.I made this account as I felt compelled to reply to you, hence the username.
If it makes you feel any better, the degree you have just done is going to have taught you far more useful skills for the workplace than my humanities degree did! If you had done English Literature, you'd be far less employable.

You've just done a degree that shows you have a broad skill set covering statistics, research methods and also good verbal reasoning.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by wishiddonelit)
So I'm about to enter my final term of psychology, and I wish I had asked these questions before I did.I nearly went for English lit, and I wish now that I had. I too don't have an aptitude for science, but did well at psych A-level (as it is more theoretical with only knowledge of research methods rather than application).'My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.'- I think a lot of people (including myself) study psych for this reason but can easily become jaded (as I have) at how different academic psych is in reality. Aside from some theory, it is mainly research methods, and it is very impersonal. It includes a lot of statistics and badgering people to take surveys.Obviously there will be social and even cognitive aspects which may interest you on a personal level - but if you are like me and do not enjoy research and reports (though I haven't actually done any lab studies and there is no squeamish stuff involved), you might want to reconsider.That being said, I've still done well - just begrudgingly. And you could also consider what you would want to do with psychology. Personally it's driven me away from a career in psychology. From what you've described, you might consider a degree in psychotherapy / counselling / social / developmental psychology more?Hope that helps.I made this account as I felt compelled to reply to you, hence the username.
Well I did geography. Great degree but utterly useless.
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alexxhales
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(Original post by stress11)
If you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Psychology has if you have a passion for psychology, for sure do it. I hate science, only did chemistry GCSE and I’m still doing psychology A-level. Doing psychology shows a multitude of different skills from evaluation skills to applying your knowledge, it’s scientific based, it’s maths space but the good thing is it’s not at the highest level and is definitely doable. The only thing is, Psychology is obviously based highly on labwork and research methods if you are so scream-ish to the point you can’t do this then I don’t suggest doing psychology
I'm definitely passionate about certain areas of the subject but I'm not sure I'm that passionate about the subject in general. I don't mind the fact that it's science and maths based, even though this stuff (esp science) does not come naturally for me. Glad to hear it is doable, though.
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alexxhales
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(Original post by ElephantMemory)
It's all pseudo science with no real career prospects. When you meet a psychologist or receive treatment from a psychologist, you quickly learn they are all just blagging it and have no clue what they are talking about.
(Original post by TheOnlyIzzy)
Psychology can have good career prospects in anything ranging from marketing to psychiatric hospitals, however because so many people take the Bsc degree (bachelors) it’s almost useless at that level. You will have to take an Msci (intergrated masters) or MSc (masters) to stand a solid chance
But I don't necessarily want to do it or use it in my career. I only want to study it mainly for academic reasons like the ones I listed, and personal growth.
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byeongkwans
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(Original post by ElephantMemory)
It's all pseudo science with no real career prospects. When you meet a psychologist or receive treatment from a psychologist, you quickly learn they are all just blagging it and have no clue what they are talking about.
How many psychologists have you met or received treatment from? Just out of curiosity.
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AliceV_647
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(Original post by ElephantMemory)
It's all pseudo science with no real career prospects. When you meet a psychologist or receive treatment from a psychologist, you quickly learn they are all just blagging it and have no clue what they are talking about.
Ummmm I think you'll find it is a science?? The degree that I'm about to start is literally as scientific as my biology A level was... plus it's definitely not a bad degree, as long as you actually go to a decent uni you can use it to go into pretty much any job sector with some further training.
(Also: just because treatment has not worked for you doesn't mean it's rubbish CBT for example is completely scientifically backed and works for most people...)

(Original post by alexxhales)
So, I'm thinking of studying psychology at uni but because I never liked or showed much aptitude for science, I'm wondering, would be the wrong choice?

My reasons for studying it are mainly to understand myself and others better and use what I learn to help me become stronger mentally and emotionally. Also because I find complex things like our emotions fascinating, and why we behave the way we do.

I feel like overall, I'm more interested in the social/personal side of the subject, although part of me is into the more sciency stuff, such as cognition, theory of mind, etc. What puts me off, however, is actually carrying out research or doing any sort of lab work as I'm very squeamish and this sort of stuff makes me feel sick. Which is weird considering that psychology IS a science, and these things are very much a part of the study of any science, so I've heard.

Thoughts on this?
It depends which degree you do! If you go for an accredited one (that enables you to go on to further qualifications and become an actual psychologist) then they will likely have a decent amount of science in them. Equally some degrees are less scientific than others. Maybe have a look at some unis you like and read the course modules - that should hopefully give you an idea. That's what I did anyway, as I knew I wanted a more scientific degree - so different goal but same method haha!
(P.S. if you're just worried about your aptitude, don't let that put you off - most degrees do have a significant practical element, but you'll be fine! Also, not all courses involve dissection etc - so practicals might not be as gross as you think Once again, I can't speak from experience as I haven't done a psychology degree yet, but that's what I've gathered from open days etc!)
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alexxhales
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
Psychology is a science, you will not learn much about how to better understand others or become stronger, that's more wishy washy self-help *******s not psychology degree.
Well, according to research and people who have studied psychology, it has helped them achieve both these things.
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alexxhales
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Psychology is for snake oil salesmen. No jobs at the end of it and just a load of weird theories stuck in your head.
Not everyone is looking to get a job, or make money out of it, though. Some of us want to study it because we're genuinely interested in the subject.
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TheOnlyIzzy
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(Original post by alexxhales)
But I don't necessarily want to do it or use it in my career. I only want to study it mainly for academic reasons like the ones I listed, and personal growth.
If you like it for academic reasons and personal growth you could consider going into research as a career so you’d stay doing the same things.

I know you said you don’t want to do it as a career but unless you have the spare cash to support and sustain yourself throughout and after university without needing this degree later on, you might run into trouble. It’s going to cost 27 thousand minimum without any living costs just to do it. If you have that much disposable cash then go for it, but it is usually seen as a stepping stone to a career that will be able to pay off the dept
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by alexxhales)
Not everyone is looking to get a job, or make money out of it, though. Some of us want to study it because we're genuinely interested in the subject.
Yes but unless you have the luxury of a trust fund or a large inheritance we all have to work. Do you have a trust fund etc
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