should fluent foreign language speakers be able to study it at a-level? Watch

steamed-hams
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
e.g. if you speak french should you be allowed to study french a-level? this is on the assumption they will get an A*
1
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Yeah because French A-level is not simply learning the language
1
reply
stress11
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
They are only allowed to take it if they haven’t been living there for 3+ years I think
0
reply
stress11
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
And most of them find it difficult as they’ve only learnt to speak it not write it and the other skills that come with it eg grammar
0
reply
CTLeafez
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by stress11)
They are only allowed to take it if they haven’t been living there for 3+ years I think
Do you have a source for that? I've never heard that restriction and had a German exchange friend who stayed with us for Year 10 + 11, doing GCSE German alongside us.

Personally, I think it would be really silly to discriminate against someone for having essentially prior knowledge of the topic. Would the exam board stop a kid from doing GCSE/A-Level History if their parents were historians and taught them at home?
0
reply
steamed-hams
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Sinnoh)
Yeah because French A-level is not simply learning the language
but do u think they have an unfair advantage?
1
reply
stress11
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by CTLeafez)
Do you have a source for that? I've never heard that restriction and had a German exchange friend who stayed with us for Year 10 + 11, doing GCSE German alongside us.

Personally, I think it would be really silly to discriminate against someone for having essentially prior knowledge of the topic. Would the exam board stop a kid from doing GCSE/A-Level History if their parents were historians and taught them at home?
This girl in my school did gcse french with us and did a level french at the same time as she used to live in Luxembourg so our french teacher brought it up to us as we always used to say how unfair it was! I personally don’t think it’s fair as history and French are in comparable as one you grow up learning subconsciously and one you put time and effort into learning consciously
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
So what if it's unfair? Honestly, both native and foreign speakers can attain an A*. The former just have to work less. So what? Concentrate on yourself, and you will have a much higher chance of succeeding.

Oxford Mum, tell 'em.
Last edited by Tolgarda; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by steamed-hams)
e.g. if you speak french should you be allowed to study french a-level? this is on the assumption they will get an A*
If you speak French (as a native/home French speaker) you are allowed to take French A level. However, language A levels (other than English) are designed for native English speakers who have had to learn the subject outside the home environment (ie not as an immersion language). Therefore Universities are allowed to consider the context of the grade a native language speaker might be awarded (ie ignore it for the purpose of admissions).
0
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
Tolgarda you are correct. Why shouldn’t native speakers be allowed to take a level in their own language? There’s no law against it.

If you’re applying to Oxford for languages though, don’t forget it’s over 80 percent literature, so being fluent won’t necessarily help you...
0
reply
gr8wizard10
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
shouldn't be able to do english then
0
reply
kerisx
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
In that same sense, English people have an unfair advantage when doing English GCSE and A level
1
reply
MinaBee
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by kerisx)
In that same sense, English people have an unfair advantage when doing English GCSE and A level
(Original post by gr8wizard10)
shouldn't be able to do english then
How are they even comparable? GCSE and A-level English language you're writing stories and learning things like the impact of language. If you do GCSE or A-level French you're pretty much learning the language from scratch.

Yes, you do have to do other things like learn about the culture and study a book and a film which native speakers can find difficult too, but you can't deny that if you were brought up speaking French you're going to have a massive advantage when you're sitting in a class with people who've had a few lessons a week in it for a few years.
3
reply
bad bunny
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 weeks ago
#14
the only issue people have with it is that native speakers tend to raise the grade boundaries meaning it becomes more difficult for non native speakers to achieve higher grades however an A/A* is what it is at the end of the day so it shouldn't matter if you have that advantage, make the most of it.
1
reply
giella
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
Put yourself in their shoes. Go and live and study in another country where you’re not a native speaker and tell me you’d put principle above personal gain and not go for an easy A. Of course you would. And for the sake of balance, let me tell you about a student of mine who was a native Russian speaker who couldn’t get an A* in A level despite resitting a module twice. It’s not a guaranteed A in any case.
0
reply
kerisx
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 weeks ago
#16
Whether they're comparable or not the entire point of this question was to discuss whether it's fair for them to study it despite having an advantage. Everyone has an advantage in some subjects more than others, if you're more athletically inclined should you be allowed to study sports? I studied Religious studies for GCSE and went on to study it for A level which gave me an advantage over the students who only chose to study it for A level Some people just have to work harder than other people, it's not unfair it's simply just life.
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by MinaBee)
How are they even comparable? GCSE and A-level English language you're writing stories and learning things like the impact of language. If you do GCSE or A-level French you're pretty much learning the language from scratch.

Yes, you do have to do other things like learn about the culture and study a book and a film which native speakers can find difficult too, but you can't deny that if you were brought up speaking French you're going to have a massive advantage when you're sitting in a class with people who've had a few lessons a week in it for a few years.
You don't learn the language from scratch at A Level (I'd bloody hope not anyway!).
0
reply
MinaBee
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Tolgarda)
You don't learn the language from scratch at A Level (I'd bloody hope not anyway!).
Honestly I learnt so little from my language GCSEs that it really did feel like that then when I started them at A-level :afraid:

However, I did do the old spec GCSEs so hopefully things have changed..
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by MinaBee)
Honestly I learnt so little from my language GCSEs that it really did feel like that then when I started them at A-level :afraid:

However, I did do the old spec GCSEs so hopefully things have changed..
I think they have, a lot...

I'm just not sure how different they are to the old spec.
0
reply
Moe_00
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 weeks ago
#20
It doesn't same anymore unfair than someone whose mathematically talented doing the maths a level. You still have to put in work even if its a bit easier for you than others.
Arabic is my first language and I only got a B at alevel cause I didn't work hard enough.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How has the start of this academic year been for you?

Loving it - gonna be a great year (138)
17.76%
It's just nice to be back! (209)
26.9%
Not great so far... (279)
35.91%
I want to drop out! (151)
19.43%

Watched Threads

View All