lhabgabdgbfa
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I was wondering how a person who studies medicine in the uk can get a recidency in the US.
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ecolier
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(Original post by lhabgabdgbfa)
I was wondering how a person who studies medicine in the uk can get a recidency in the US.
Study the USMLE. If you knew you wanted to work in the US, you should have studied in the US.

International Medical Graduates tend to get the much less competitive jobs and cities.

My personal opinion is always study where you want to work.
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lhabgabdgbfa
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(Original post by ecolier)
Study the USMLE. If you knew you wanted to work in the US, you should have studied in the US.

International Medical Graduates tend to get the much less competitive jobs and cities.

My personal opinion is always study where you want to work.
alright thanks for that. But on a more random note, is it fine if I do my a level maths in year 12 when applying to medicine, I heard that med schools when all subjects to be done in one go, but wouldn't doing a level maths in year 12 lead to less work in year 13
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ecolier
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(Original post by lhabgabdgbfa)
alright thanks for that. But on a more random note, is it fine if I do my a level maths in year 12 when applying to medicine, I heard that med schools when all subjects to be done in one go, but wouldn't doing a level maths in year 12 lead to less work in year 13
Doesn't matter as long as it took you less than or equal to 2 years to achieve all your grades. Obviously if you got your grades in a year - well done!

Even if you retook A-Levels, there are still 18 med schools who will consider your application these days.
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lhabgabdgbfa
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(Original post by ecolier)
Doesn't matter as long as it took you less than or equal to 2 years to achieve all your grades. Obviously if you got your grades in a year - well done!

Even if you retook A-Levels, there are still 18 med schools who will consider your application these days.
alright thanks for all the help
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dan150999
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Hi I did my A level maths in a year but held just 1 module back and still got in
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dan150999
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(Original post by ecolier)
Study the USMLE. If you knew you wanted to work in the US, you should have studied in the US.

International Medical Graduates tend to get the much less competitive jobs and cities.

My personal opinion is always study where you want to work.
how easy or difficult is it to work abroad just for a year or so? I know a few doctors go to aus or NZ for just a year and do a bit of work there or locumming. How do you do that? Still have to take another exam?
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ecolier
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(Original post by dan150999)
how easy or difficult is it to work abroad just for a year or so?
Not that hard! There are many agencies who will actively recruit doctors - highlighting the positive aspects.

I know a few doctors go to aus or NZ for just a year and do a bit of work there or locumming. How do you do that? Still have to take another exam?
As above. Whether you need to take an exam or not depends - I think (could be wrong!) for some areas that are not in demand; and if you're supervised then there is no need. If you are thinking of permanently working there; or if you want to work in competitive areas - then you will.

To work in the USA, you will always need to take the USMLE (after all, the local med students do so why are IMGs different?). I don't think you'll need to take exams to work in the Middle East , and the salary is apparently very enticing (think 3-4x UK) - but only for consultants(?).

P. S. Loads of information here: https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/career...working-abroad
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CuriosityYay
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(Original post by ecolier)
To work in the USA, you will always need to take the USMLE (after all, the local med students do so why are IMGs different?). I don't think you'll need to take exams to work in the Middle East , and the salary is apparently very enticing (think 3-4x UK) - but only for consultants(?).
When you said "the salary is very enticing (probably for consultants only)", Did you mean in the USA or in the Middle East or both?

Thanks in advance!
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ecolier
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(Original post by CuriosityYay)
When you said "the salary is very enticing (probably for consultants only)", Did you mean in the USA or in the Middle East or both?

Thanks in advance!
Middle East (I personally have no intention to go).

Senior doctors in the US generally earn more than those in the UK also, but as a foreign medical graduate you're unlikely to get through to a competitive specialty.
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CuriosityYay
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(Original post by ecolier)
Middle East (I personally have no intention to go).

Senior doctors in the US generally earn more than those in the UK also, but as a foreign medical graduate you're unlikely to get through to a competitive specialty.
I asked because I live in the Middle East. Universities here are free (no fees, no student debts/finance etc). Also, they require 8 IGCSEs and only 1 A level. Plus Admission is 100% based on the average of the the grades of the 9 subjects. (i.e they take the students with the highest average until all seats are taken, no interviews, personal statement, etc).

So my questions are:

1- If you were in my place (have no problem living in the Middle East) Would you go to uni in the Middle East (at home) or study in the UK (abroad)?

2- What is the possibility of finding work in the UK being a foreign Med graduate (after the NHS regulations and exams are passed)? What about the possibility of finding work in the UK after taking a Masters Degree in the Middle East and after taking it from the UK?

3- If you were me would you even consider going to the UK?

2- What about starting Medical School in Germany? How much do they earn after graduation? (3 A levels (bio, chem, math) and one AS level language (german or english or even arabic) are the requirements)

I am researching on my side, but just wanted to hear an experienced opinion.

Thanks in advance!
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asif007
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(Original post by CuriosityYay)
I asked because I live in the Middle East. Universities here are free (no fees, no student debts/finance etc). Also, they require 8 IGCSEs and only 1 A level. Plus Admission is 100% based on the average of the the grades of the 9 subjects. (i.e they take the students with the highest average until all seats are taken, no interviews, personal statement, etc).

So my questions are:

1- If you were in my place (have no problem living in the Middle East) Would you go to uni in the Middle East (at home) or study in the UK (abroad)?

2- What is the possibility of finding work in the UK being a foreign Med graduate (after the NHS regulations and exams are passed)? What about the possibility of finding work in the UK after taking a Masters Degree in the Middle East and after taking it from the UK?

3- If you were me would you even consider going to the UK?

2- What about starting Medical School in Germany? How much do they earn after graduation? (3 A levels (bio, chem, math) and one AS level language (german or english or even arabic) are the requirements)

I am researching on my side, but just wanted to hear an experienced opinion.

Thanks in advance!
People can tell you to study where you want to work but in reality it’s not always as easy as that. As you already live in the Middle East (I’m assuming you’ve been settled there for a while) and the tuition there is FREE, I would suggest you stay in the Middle East. If you enrol as an international student in the UK you’ll be paying insanely high tuition fees out of your own pocket (I believe no student loans for international students). All that expense and living away from home for a medical degree that won’t significantly improve your chances of getting a job in the USA if that’s your ultimate aim. Doctors who qualified from all over the world manage to get great jobs in popular parts of the country. They might have had to start out in undesirable parts of America but eventually they move on to bigger cities. India and Pakistan-trained doctors do particularly well, and I don’t think the quality of medical education in those countries is any better or worse than the Middle East. I know doctors who have graduated in the UK, Czech Republic and Romania who are all aiming for the USA and will very likely get it. Whichever country you graduate from, all you need to focus on is acing the USMLE and getting an elective in America with some letters of recommendation from consultants there. The rest is out of your hands. As mentioned already, all graduates from everywhere outside America will have to do USMLE but I doubt the reputation of your country or medical school matters much at this stage of the application. Do yourself a favour and don’t pay international student fees to study in the UK when you will get broadly the same education in the Middle East and have to do the same application process for America. If I was in your position, I would stay in the Middle East purely because the tuition is free.

Similar applies for working in the UK. By the time you graduate you’ll probably have to sit UKMLA but once you pass that, you get acceptance to the doctors register and can apply for work anywhere in the UK, visa permitting.

Which country in the Middle East are we talking about?
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ecolier
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(Original post by CuriosityYay)
...1- If you were in my place (have no problem living in the Middle East) Would you go to uni in the Middle East (at home) or study in the UK (abroad)?
I have been told that Middle East institutions pay more for foreign graduates (from the UK or US or Australia etc.). It's up to you to decide. Study overseas is a privilege and hence it is expensive.

2- What is the possibility of finding work in the UK being a foreign Med graduate (after the NHS regulations and exams are passed)? What about the possibility of finding work in the UK after taking a Masters Degree in the Middle East and after taking it from the UK?
Some specialties will give priority to those who are UK citizens. Read https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...019%20v1.2.pdf (Page 12)

Other non-UK or non-EEA nationals with limited leave to remain in the UK, whose employment will require a Tier 2 visa, are subject to the Resident Labour Market Test (RLMT) and would only be considered for appointment if there were no suitable UK or EEA national (settled status) candidates for the post.

3- If you were me would you even consider going to the UK?
I would, but would recommend that you weigh up the pros and cons yourself.

2- What about starting Medical School in Germany? How much do they earn after graduation? (3 A levels (bio, chem, math) and one AS level language (german or english or even arabic) are the requirements)
I don't know how much German doctors earn in Germany. It will be similar to UK doctors, perhaps slightly more or less depending on rota / specialty.

I am researching on my side, but just wanted to hear an experienced opinion.

Thanks in advance!
No problems. I am familiar with UK specialty training so feel free to ask me more Qs.

I stand by my person opinion that you should study where you want to work (if you can choose); I have seen plenty of junior doctors who finds it hard to adapt to the culture of working in a foreign country - leading to poor performance and dissatisfaction. Also remember that UK post-grad exam pass rates are significantly lower for foreign medical graduates - it's not deliberate (the examiners don't know where they graduated from), just the cultural / educational differences. If you wanted to work locally and pass local post-grad exams - absolutely fine.
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CuriosityYay
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(Original post by asif007)
People can tell you to study where you want to work but in reality it’s not always as easy as that. As you already live in the Middle East (I’m assuming you’ve been settled there for a while) and the tuition there is FREE, I would suggest you stay in the Middle East. If you enrol as an international student in the UK you’ll be paying insanely high tuition fees out of your own pocket (I believe no student loans for international students). All that expense and living away from home for a medical degree that won’t significantly improve your chances of getting a job in the USA if that’s your ultimate aim. Doctors who qualified from all over the world manage to get great jobs in popular parts of the country. They might have had to start out in undesirable parts of America but eventually they move on to bigger cities. India and Pakistan-trained doctors do particularly well, and I don’t think the quality of medical education in those countries is any better or worse than the Middle East. I know doctors who have graduated in the UK, Czech Republic and Romania who are all aiming for the USA and will very likely get it. Whichever country you graduate from, all you need to focus on is acing the USMLE and getting an elective in America with some letters of recommendation from consultants there. The rest is out of your hands. As mentioned already, all graduates from everywhere outside America will have to do USMLE but I doubt the reputation of your country or medical school matters much at this stage of the application. Do yourself a favour and don’t pay international student fees to study in the UK when you will get broadly the same education in the Middle East and have to do the same application process for America. If I was in your position, I would stay in the Middle East purely because the tuition is free.

Similar applies for working in the UK. By the time you graduate you’ll probably have to sit UKMLA but once you pass that, you get acceptance to the doctors register and can apply for work anywhere in the UK, visa permitting.

Which country in the Middle East are we talking about?
Egypt. It is present on my profile.

(Original post by ecolier)
I have been told that Middle East institutions pay more for foreign graduates (from the UK or US or Australia etc.). It's up to you to decide. Study overseas is a privilege and hence it is expensive.



Some specialties will give priority to those who are UK citizens. Read https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...019%20v1.2.pdf (Page 12)

Other non-UK or non-EEA nationals with limited leave to remain in the UK, whose employment will require a Tier 2 visa, are subject to the Resident Labour Market Test (RLMT) and would only be considered for appointment if there were no suitable UK or EEA national (settled status) candidates for the post.



I would, but would recommend that you weigh up the pros and cons yourself.



I don't know how much German doctors earn in Germany. It will be similar to UK doctors, perhaps slightly more or less depending on rota / specialty.



No problems. I am familiar with UK specialty training so feel free to ask me more Qs.

I stand by my person opinion that you should study where you want to work (if you can choose); I have seen plenty of junior doctors who finds it hard to adapt to the culture of working in a foreign country - leading to poor performance and dissatisfaction. Also remember that UK post-grad exam pass rates are significantly lower for foreign medical graduates - it's not deliberate (the examiners don't know where they graduated from), just the cultural / educational differences. If you wanted to work locally and pass local post-grad exams - absolutely fine.
Thanks a lot! That cleared up a lot of misconceptions.
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by dan150999)
how easy or difficult is it to work abroad just for a year or so? I know a few doctors go to aus or NZ for just a year and do a bit of work there or locumming. How do you do that? Still have to take another exam?
Try taking a look at https://www.inovacareers.org/, or www.inova.com. They are a large hospital just outside Washington, D.C. I know that they have a large number of Uk nurses on staff, in fact they have a Briton in HR whose main job is dealing with the Britons on staff. There are other hospitals in the area, such as "George Washington University Hospital" or "Columbia-Arlington Hospital". I have been in INOVA as a patient, and found it a pleasant experience. The staff seemed happy too.
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