What cities would you say are left wing or right wing? Watch

DillyDilly0121
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People say that the north are heavily left wing.
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The Mogg
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As someone from the North of a pretty left wing country in the UK (Wales) I can kind of vouch for that. I come from a long line of Labour voters and it seems like almost everyone around me does as well.
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fallen_acorns
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just google the last few election result maps, and that will give you a pretty good start.

but remember that its not as simple as left/right.. for example in my experiance larger parts of the north are very economically left, and in line with Labour.. but are actually more socially right-wing than the south. For example, I have seen far far more progressive views on LGBT/Feminism/Racial issues in my time living in a middle-class conservative stronghold in the south, then I saw when I lived in a labour-stronghold near Liverpool.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by DillyDilly0121)
People say that the north are heavily left wing.
It’s somewhat difficult to say exactly because there are cases of suburbs having their own councils for example but if we stick purely to councils of the cities..

Liverpool - 0 Tories
Manchester - 0 Tories
Leeds - Tories the second largest party
Sheffield - 0 Tories
Nottingham - 2 Tories
Birmingham - Tories the second largest party
Bristol - Tories the second largest party
Newcastle - 0 Tories
Cardiff - Tories second largest party
Swansea - Tories second largest party
Edinburgh - Tories 2 seats shy of being largest party
Glasgow - Tories third largest party
London Assembly - Tories second largest party

So ignoring the more pro-Tory bias of suburbs (the Tories hold parliamentary seats in Merseyside and Greater Manchester for example) it would seem that the most right wing city is actually Edinburgh and the most left wing cities Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield and Newcastle..
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AW_1983
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(Original post by DillyDilly0121)
People say that the north are heavily left wing.
Depends what you mean by left wing. As a general rule, cities tend to be a bit more left leaning in their voting behaviours (e.g. Remain rather than Brexit, more Labour MPs in urban areas etc). Also, this is more pronounced in the north where there are cities with no Conservative MPs at all in places like Sheffield or Liverpool.

However, in stark contrast to voting behaviour, attitude surveys consistently show the north to be no more left wing than the south. So although people might vote Labour and hate the Tories in the north, they're not necessarily left wing (and this might explain why Jeremy Corbyn sometimes polls even lower than what has traditionally been Labour's floor of about 27%).
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999tigger
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Think you will find it links up with wealth and poverty.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by AW_1983)
Depends what you mean by left wing. As a general rule, cities tend to be a bit more left leaning in their voting behaviours (e.g. Remain rather than Brexit, more Labour MPs in urban areas etc). Also, this is more pronounced in the north where there are cities with no Conservative MPs at all in places like Sheffield or Liverpool.

However, in stark contrast to voting behaviour, attitude surveys consistently show the north to be no more left wing than the south. So although people might vote Labour and hate the Tories in the north, they're not necessarily left wing (and this might explain why Jeremy Corbyn sometimes polls even lower than what has traditionally been Labour's floor of about 27%).
(Original post by 999tigger)
Think you will find it links up with wealth and poverty.
It goes back to the 1980’s.

In the South which outside London was relatively rural and service based the rise of the right and policies like Right To Buy generally led to both a short and long term rise in prosperity as your old villages gradually became wealthier.

In the north where state industry was dominant like mining or manufacturing the short term hit was negative even though most of the larger cities like Leeds have thrived during the last and current business cycles. Because the median voter age is around 50 though, there are still people directly impacted voting in large numbers.

It should be noted however that in general the right in the north is rising as the median voter becomes the person that grew up in the recovery and equally immigration and white flight is weakening the grip close to London. Wales saw a record Tory vote share, Scotland and the North East saw a swing to the Tories.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Rakas21)
It goes back to the 1980’s.

In the South which outside London was relatively rural and service based the rise of the right and policies like Right To Buy generally led to both a short and long term rise in prosperity as your old villages gradually became wealthier.

In the north where state industry was dominant like mining or manufacturing the short term hit was negative even though most of the larger cities like Leeds have thrived during the last and current business cycles. Because the median voter age is around 50 though, there are still people directly impacted voting in large numbers.

It should be noted however that in general the right in the north is rising as the median voter becomes the person that grew up in the recovery and equally immigration and white flight is weakening the grip close to London. Wales saw a record Tory vote share, Scotland and the North East saw a swing to the Tories.
I know the history of the UK. It goes back a long way before the 80s.
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it'snotthecounty
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I'd confidently say that Sheffield is particularly left-wing.
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chazwomaq
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Cities are generally more left wing than rural areas.
Wales, The North and Scotland are more left wing than the South.
But fallen_acorns is right about economic/voting and social differences.

Right-wing cities are quite hard to think of. Maybe Chichester, Gloucester and Worcester?
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AW_1983
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(Original post by Rakas21)
It goes back to the 1980’s.

In the South which outside London was relatively rural and service based the rise of the right and policies like Right To Buy generally led to both a short and long term rise in prosperity as your old villages gradually became wealthier.

In the north where state industry was dominant like mining or manufacturing the short term hit was negative even though most of the larger cities like Leeds have thrived during the last and current business cycles. Because the median voter age is around 50 though, there are still people directly impacted voting in large numbers.

It should be noted however that in general the right in the north is rising as the median voter becomes the person that grew up in the recovery and equally immigration and white flight is weakening the grip close to London. Wales saw a record Tory vote share, Scotland and the North East saw a swing to the Tories.
Agree, although a general decline in Conservative voters under the age of 50 must be taken into account as well to get an idea of where we will be 10 years from now. I know some theories are based on the idea that people become more right wing as they age so of course Conservative voters are older, but I would point out that when I was at university 15 years ago people used to talk about why the Lib Dems were more popular than the Conservatives for voters under the age of 35. Do the maths and it suggests an unresolved problem with voters born in the 1970s onward.

My expectation is of a general flattening of the Conservative vote where they will lose their reputation for being a party of the south as much because people locked out of home ownership or trapped in the gig economy stop voting for them in counties like Hampshire, Sussex or Kent as for making some gains in vote share in the north. I also think this will eventually drive the Conservatives towards replacing FPTP because this flattening of vote share will make it much harder for them to hold on to second place under the current electoral system.

Obviously this is based on the assumption that they do nothing to put right the aspiration tax of 9% paid by graduates that makes it harder for someone from a poor background to become moderately well off than someone from a wealthy background; that they continue to stoke rather than alleviate the housing crisis and that they continue to raise working age population taxes through stealth (e.g. such as cutting the amount that can be saved in a pension tax efficiently, national insurance increases etc) in order to maintain unrealistic policy goals like a triple locked state pension and winter fuel allowances for millionaires. I used to think they would eventually correct themselves as younger members rose through the ranks but the next generation of smart Conservatives has largely been obliterated in the party's Brexit civil war!
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josh75
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Every city is left wing, the only conservatism you see in this country is outside the metropolitan areas.
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returnmigrant
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How can an entire city be 'left-wing' ....?
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RuneFreeze
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(Original post by AW_1983)
Depends what you mean by left wing. As a general rule, cities tend to be a bit more left leaning in their voting behaviours (e.g. Remain rather than Brexit, more Labour MPs in urban areas etc). Also, this is more pronounced in the north where there are cities with no Conservative MPs at all in places like Sheffield or Liverpool.

However, in stark contrast to voting behaviour, attitude surveys consistently show the north to be no more left wing than the south. So although people might vote Labour and hate the Tories in the north, they're not necessarily left wing (and this might explain why Jeremy Corbyn sometimes polls even lower than what has traditionally been Labour's floor of about 27%).
Most of what you say is correct, but I don't think it's fair to say voting remain is 'left wing'. Also when you say Jeremy Corbyn polls below 27% are you talking about voting intention polls or leadership polls?
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Ferrograd
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I'm from Essex which forms part of the East of England region. It's a pretty right wing region, its socially conservative and economically conservative. Most people are brexit voters, which is more to do with immigration, even though there are few immigrants here. A lot of rural folk in places in the North of essex, suffolk and norfolk etc. The "least gay" region of the UK and also one of the oldest, basically all Tory
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RuneFreeze
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
How can an entire city be 'left-wing' ....?
A city can be left-wing if people in that city, when polled, have left wing views on certain issues when compared to the country as a whole. Another indicator is the political parties that win in a particular city.
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by RuneFreeze)
A city can be left-wing if people in that city, when polled, have left wing views on certain issues when compared to the country as a whole. Another indicator is the political parties that win in a particular city.
So, let me get this right - since 'London' has a left-wing Mayor, that means all Londoners are left-wing then, and that 'London' is left-wing?
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
The "least gay" region of the UK and also one of the oldest, basically all Tory

So homosexuality is a pre-requisite for voting Labour is it?
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
So homosexuality is a pre-requisite for voting Labour is it?
No but generally homosexuals are more likely to vote for a party that has a better reputation for looking after gays which labour does (although tories did legalise gay marriage)
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SteveyStack
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Cities are traditionally labour strongholds while the country is often pro Tory.

My gay mate would agree that you are supposed to vote Labour if gay but he votes Tory so it’s only a general rule
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