Anonymous #1
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From what I've read they sound like a normal class like the ones on sixth form. Any differences? How many people in a class? Does the teacher just talk or ask a lot of questions to students? After every lecture I have a seminar so in the seminar do we just go over what was said in the lecture or learn new things? Also for assessments, essays and stuff like that does the person eho teach the seminar set it and mark it?? I am doing Psychology BSc if that helps.
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AlexIsabel
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I'm doing a history degree, and my seminars follow directly after the lecture like yours. We usually go over parts of the lecture that people didn't understand, and then look at sources and extra material relating to it which helps us with essays. We also sometimes do bits of group work but it's never anything too difficult.

Honestly seminars are pretty relaxed, and each of mine usually has about 15 people. The tutors do ask questions but most of the time people just answer without being called on; its more of just a big group discussion.

The seminar tutors do mark your essays (at least on my course) but in second and third year they are moderated so a second person will check over it to make sure your marks are fair. Hope this helps!
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MidgetFever
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My seminars may differ to yours since we're studying different things, but it's mostly an opportunity for the students to talk rather than the tutors, the tutors just guide the conversation.

We're usually given some set reading and then some legal scenarios where we'd be asked to advise people, we'd go over our answers in the seminar and it usually turns into a debate by the end.
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Noodlzzz
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Psychology grad here, depends on the uni (e.g. UCL seminars where I went were about 6 people, other universities can do 15-30+)

- It's mostly a discussion on a set topic, such as being given a journal paper to read and you all contribute in the discussion. When you're silent, the lecturer may pick on you with a specific question to get you to engage, it's very much an interactive experience
- other things are timed essays in class (usually set the topic ahead) or small presentations in groups on certain topics
- Seminars at UCL psych were on different but related topics to the lectures, you didn't go to a lecture then have a seminar on the exact topic
- In terms of marking, yes most essays and presentations will get formative marks and feedback (though this is unlikely to contribute to your degree overall)
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