anisha211
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I want to study aeronautical/aerospace engineering in the UK at Imperial College London or a university that's similar, and then after that, I would like to work in America in a space research organisation like NASA (high expectations, I know). I read somewhere that America does not accept an MEng degree as a degree that could potentially get you a professional engineering job. Is this true and if yes, what could be an alternate option? [Please don't come at me I am still researching about all this so I have many questions that may seem dumb to some people.]
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Mattious
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No idea why America wouldn't see a BEng or MEng as a degree, of course they probably have differenet names for them over there but nonetheless you have done your 3/4 years. Sounds like a load of ****e.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by anisha211)
I want to study aeronautical/aerospace engineering in the UK at Imperial College London or a university that's similar, and then after that, I would like to work in America in a space research organisation like NASA (high expectations, I know). I read somewhere that America does not accept an MEng degree as a degree that could potentially get you a professional engineering job. Is this true and if yes, what could be an alternate option? [Please don't come at me I am still researching about all this so I have many questions that may seem dumb to some people.]
Yes, it does for immigration purposes. For Engineering, I don't know (I'm in Software), but would be amazed if it weren't. As you probably know, a BEng equivalent is 4 years, and an MEng 6 years, in the US. They are typically broader degrees though.

However, many sensitive areas (e.g. NASA) require US citizenship. That can take a while to obtain once you are in the country. You need to have had a Green Card for 5 years before applying, and getting that can take a long time, depending upon your employer and nationality.
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swelshie
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I don't see why a UK degree wouldn't qualify you to apply to entry level jobs in the states. MEng can even be taken as equivalent to a masters (post-grad) depending on the employer. But very few people get jobs abroad due to the competition and visa requirements (very expensive and lengthy process) when there is a glut of fresh graduates in either country.
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Helloworld_95
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Yes, MEng is fine. The idea that it isn't accepted is quite an old one from where the UK MEng wasn't commonly taken alongside nationalistic ideals that a 4 year degree can't be worth the same as 6 years of education, and just poor education of HR and admissions departments (the US Department of Education literally had to send a notice to many universities about how many 4 year bachelor's degrees were not equivalent to the 4 year US bachelor's degree, while most 3 year programmes were).

As other people have said, the lack of US citizenship or a green card will be your biggest hurdle for working in aerospace as it basically makes it impossible to work in nearly every aerospace job in the US. As above, there are also visa issues which are currently getting worse in the US and better in the UK. There are some exceptions made for NASA but we're talking PhD graduates recommended to NASA by someone who works there. I would be looking at ESA, Arianespace, or Airbus/SSTL instead as you will find these organisations a lot easier to get into.

Also Imperial isn't even close to the top for space, put Surrey, Strathclyde, Southampton, and Sheffield on your list as they're where you will be best able to go into the space industry from. UCL also has a notable space research group but it's relatively small and I don't think they compete in student competitions as much as those other unis.
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anisha211
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Yes, it does for immigration purposes. For Engineering, I don't know (I'm in Software), but would be amazed if it weren't. As you probably know, a BEng equivalent is 4 years, and an MEng 6 years, in the US. They are typically broader degrees though.

However, many sensitive areas (e.g. NASA) require US citizenship. That can take a while to obtain once you are in the country. You need to have had a Green Card for 5 years before applying, and getting that can take a long time, depending upon your employer and nationality.
Thanks so much for the answer!! The Green Card/Citizenship is not a big problem because I am already a US citizen...I was born in the US and I am currently in the UK just because of my dad's job
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anisha211
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
Yes, MEng is fine. The idea that it isn't accepted is quite an old one from where the UK MEng wasn't commonly taken alongside nationalistic ideals that a 4 year degree can't be worth the same as 6 years of education, and just poor education of HR and admissions departments (the US Department of Education literally had to send a notice to many universities about how many 4 year bachelor's degrees were not equivalent to the 4 year US bachelor's degree, while most 3 year programmes were).

As other people have said, the lack of US citizenship or a green card will be your biggest hurdle for working in aerospace as it basically makes it impossible to work in nearly every aerospace job in the US. As above, there are also visa issues which are currently getting worse in the US and better in the UK. There are some exceptions made for NASA but we're talking PhD graduates recommended to NASA by someone who works there. I would be looking at ESA, Arianespace, or Airbus/SSTL instead as you will find these organisations a lot easier to get into.

Also Imperial isn't even close to the top for space, put Surrey, Strathclyde, Southampton, and Sheffield on your list as they're where you will be best able to go into the space industry from. UCL also has a notable space research group but it's relatively small and I don't think they compete in student competitions as much as those other unis.
Hi!! Thanks for the answer and especially thank you for the extra advice! As I said in another reply, the Green Card/US Citizenship is not an issue as I already am a US citizen. Also, just another question: I thought that UCL didn't have a aerospace/aeronautical engineering course for undergraduates or post graduates???
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by anisha211)
Hi!! Thanks for the answer and especially thank you for the extra advice! As I said in another reply, the Green Card/US Citizenship is not an issue as I already am a US citizen. Also, just another question: I thought that UCL didn't have a aerospace/aeronautical engineering course for undergraduates or post graduates???
My bad, must've missed it. Why not apply to US unis then?
UCL doesn't have an undergraduate course for aero but you don't need an aero degree to work in the space industry. They definitely do have a postgraduate course in space science and technology alongside a research group for it.
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